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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/29/2020 in all areas

  1. Aim for the top, there's more room there. Quoted this morning by Senator Lamar Alexander.
    4 points
  2. This long weekend I managed to get one of the bunch of three folders I'm working on ready to add scales to prior to final assembly. The other two got new blades (one of them twice when the dovetail cutter slipped and broke through the first replacement blade ) and one got a new spring when it turned out the first one didn't want to be tweaked any further. All parts currently cooling down in their respective tempering ovens, the blades in the brick-filled toaster and the spring in the Evenheat. Here's the one that worked from the beginning. I kind of lik
    3 points
  3. Hey everyone. I tried my first hamon 2 days ago. I used Rutland refractory cement and .041 wire. It looked like the hamon half took after many hours of sanding. Like a dummy I decided I wanted to try to quench again to get a full hamon. What I didnt pay attention to was how lean the edge was after all that sanding. Again, like a dummy I decided to water quench it. Im sure you're cringing already. Yes it blew up lol. Ive been working on another blade already and the last picture is how it sits right now. It is currently sanded to 1200 and just got a wiped with lemon juice for about 10
    2 points
  4. Hello all. Here's the first episode of the NWBA's KnifeMaker's Corner:
    2 points
  5. As time goes by things change! however this place still has a large place in my heart and was part of an awakening I will always be gratefull for. It still stands as a rare example of how one should behave and interact on the internet ...with passion , understanding and a leash on the ego.
    2 points
  6. Evening Hivemind. So I seem to have painted myself into a corner with a hunter I’m making. I decided to try my hand at scrimshaw. The rabbit looks a bit, well, rabid. I thought the pheasant came out okay. Anyway I didn’t want to make the bolster package and then mess up on the scrimshaw so I decided to do the scrimshaw first. Problem is: how do I now work down the brass and fibre spacers (edges bent over a bit from grinding in the photos, they are flat though) to the antler profile without risking erasing the scrimshaw. Things aren’t glued up yet so I thought: remove, scribe, file, re-assemb
    1 point
  7. Since no one else has started a WIP I guess I will start things off. When Emiliano proposed this it really got my gears going, and this is what I came up with, its still just in design phase as I am getting my shop setup this weekend finally after nearly 2months of being down. I chose spring, and to go tanto with cherry blossom motif. The house I just sold had Cherry Trees in the back yard and every spring we had light pink petals everywhere for weeks. Its the one thing I will miss about that house besides the forest of Aspens we also had on the other side of the yard
    1 point
  8. Here is where is my blade stands, printing up and carving in the cherry blossom motifs today along with charring and sanding the handle and saya and then sealing it. This has been a LOT of new work for me, but I very much enjoyed it.
    1 point
  9. I'd carefully tape over it and neurotically slowly file down the spacers. Call the rabbit a March Hare, he does look angry...
    1 point
  10. Thanks BillyO 2nd (rabbit) and 3rd (pheasant). 1st was to see if I could... a demented duck of some kind
    1 point
  11. I'd say what you're thinking is a good start, and when glued up, finish by hand, and use the extra time involved as a reminder not to do that again. Looks really good, btw, especially if that's a first attempt at scrimshaw.
    1 point
  12. After the hunt is done and the meat processed and bought to the table a good knife is needed to help enjoy the fruits of your endevours. I have been working on a table knife/steak knife design over the last couple of years and now have it where I convinced that it is worthy of presenting to my customer base. There is a His'n'Hers in the pair with the Hers being a fraction shorter in both handle and blade. Blades is NitroV SS with the first pair being spalted buckeye and the second pair with maple burl. These are some of the trial knives I have done and rejec
    1 point
  13. Thank you! I think I will hang it up as a reminder of what to look for on my next blade. You guys and this forum is amazing
    1 point
  14. I'm not going to tell you it safe to use. I see two ways to go. 1. Make it a wall hanger. A reminder of what not to do. 2. Test it. With some protective gear on. Break or try to. If it breaks then look at why. Poor grain structure or dark stains at the break. I realize u are just starting out and its hard to destroy a blade you've spend hours one. But, it can be a learning tool. I've done a lot of test blades. Some because I didn't feel comfortable with my process. Some deliberate. But I'd rather break one in the shop rather than have it fail when I needed it.
    1 point
  15. My Lady Wife wore a damascus wedding ring for many years (until arthritis made it impossible). It was 1080 and 15n20 and it never rusted. Skin oils and daily wear kept rust away. It did change color a bit as her body chemistry shifted, but rust was never a problem Geoff
    1 point
  16. Here is a 68 layer ladder pattern I made from 15N20, 1084, and 52100. Started as 17 layers that I cut into 4 pieces and re-stacked. Handle is Snakewood with 5/16" mosaic pins I made. Blade is 7" long and about 13" overall length, and about 1 5/8" wide. I ground the fuller with a 1" wheel. I used blue liner material between the tang and scales, but apparently didn't get a picture of that.. Blade is around 60 HRC. I did a double taper for the edge. It is flat ground. Hope you like it.
    1 point
  17. Yep, had to leave forge and didn't want to leave a hot piece of 5160 laying around. Without thinking I buried it the water bucket. More snaps and pops that a bowl of rice crispies. In the future,, A quick online check will tell you which oils to use for specific metals. Good luck in your endeavors with blades.
    1 point
  18. First off, welcome aboard! Now the bad news... What you have there is classic case of quench cracks. Despite what the description says, 1095 in thin blade form should never be quenched in water or brine. It's just too harsh a quench. Thick 1095 stuff works okay, but thin blades will almost always crack on you. On your next one try using hot (hot enough you don't want to keep your finger in it) canola oil or mineral oil. That'll be a fast enough quench to fully harden the 1095 without cracking it. 1095 is picky. It has to be quenched fast to harden, but the line
    1 point
  19. I don't have any help on finding it, but you can mention the shop here. We don't ban people for spam unless they're actually spamming. Good luck! Surely there's an Australian office for Uddeholm-Bohler?
    1 point
  20. I dunno, Alan, it still feels like this place is hopping! Also, it's pretty amazing in terms of the depth of knowledge we've got archived on here. Do a google search on almost anything bladesmithing and we dominate the search results. You hear that other forums!?! We will crush you! (Yeah, I guess you have a point on the tone changing. . . Don would have never posted this. LOL)
    1 point
  21. Another big one is that the general tone of the forum changed when Don retired, and some people didn't like it. It was not deliberate, but it was inevitable since only Don is Don. I have been told this in no uncertain terms. We try to keep the core principles the same, but Dave, Me, and Niels are not Don, so there you go. Ten years down that road, it's still recognizably the same place, but like all places time does not stand still. The rise of social media was a huge one. The makers who go to Facebook and Instagram rarely come back. And why would they? All the adoration y
    1 point
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