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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/30/2021 in all areas

  1. Another Satisfied Client... (With Explanation) First of all... this Sword is a Custom Made 1st Century Fulham Gladius that is Historically Accurate/"Inspired By." It is Historically Accurate in the Blade and Hilt Shape, Weight and Balance. However the Artwork on the Guard and Pommel are "Inspired By" Roman Mosaics of that Era and not from an archeological discovery. The grip is of historical record. The inset guard plate is made of brass and carries the family name which is engraved. The sword weight 1 lbs 8 oz. and is made from 1095 high carbon steel. The point of balance is 4.25" from the guard and this sword comes alive in your hand. The guard and pommel are totally hand carved from European Boxwood and the grip is hand carved from Holly. The grip, by the customer's request was stained darker for the carving so be seen, and then wiped so the higher surfaces are highlighted. This will be a Family Heirloom as these images mean something specific to this client's family. It will be for Display only and not used in Reenactment. One vary crazy thing is; this sword was sent to Canada via United States Postal Service. It is believed that it was opened in Canadian Customs. The blade was damaged somehow in shipping. The Tip/point appeared to have been rammed into cement and broken off. Up and down both sides of the blade's Midrib had heavy file type marks that damaged the blade. I received the Sword back, and was able to repair it. How frustrating this has been for both the client and the creator. Here is the client's Review: I was fortunate enough to commission a piece with Mr. Pointer and his work speaks for itself. He is an expert in both wood working as well as roman military equipment and his dedication to accuracy was as impressive as his knowledge on the subject matter. Mr. Pointer was able to take images directly from roman mosaic and flawlessly execute them on the piece I had commissioned. His prices I felt were fair considering the amount of work, skill and materials that went into the production of my piece. He was professional and courteous the whole way through. I would 100% recommend his services for someone looking for the absolute best in recreated roman military equipment. The only Con I can mention had absolutely nothing to do with Mr. Pointer himself. I would highly recommend to ANYONE commissioning one of his fine pieces of work to spend extra when it comes to shipping. A little extra for FedEx with the insurance is definitely worth it. May commission another piece with him at a later date if finances permit. —Mike Mike's family is calling this blade "The Peacemaker"
    5 points
  2. Forged and heat treated this today. Nothing fancy but been wanting to make a big kitchen knife for a while. Here it is so far. Blade is 14 inch from oversized rasps the Farrier uses on the heavy horses. Woke Smaug up for this one.
    2 points
  3. Some WIP photos of my latest, a short-narrow seax based on archaeological finds from early medieval England. First, I smelted some steel. I used 55lb (25kg) of "Spanish Red" iron oxide (powdered hematite), and got a very dense 15lb (6.8kg) bloom. It was mostly steel (medium-high carbon, enough to harden), and very easy to forge. After 3 folds, it was a solid bar. I stacked the bloomery steel with some medium-phosphorus wrought iron from an old fence (for color contrast), forged it into two 1/4" (6mm) bars, and twisted them opposite directions. Next I melted some scraps from an earlier smelt into a charcoal hearth to make some hypereutectic steel for the cutting edge. Success! The hearth steel puck forged very easily. This photo is from before I folded it, and already there were no major cracks. I folded it three times for good measure, then drew it out for the blade's edge. So I welded up the bars. Bloomery steel is super easy to weld, and the 1/4" bars snapped together easily. (Sorry, no pictures! I was too in the zone.) Forging the blade profile... ...and quench! It warped badly (as bloom can do), but I was able to twist it back straight with my gloved hands before it cooled. Phew. And: finished! The handle is cattle horn. Archaeological conservators who have analyzed hundreds of originals tell me the handles were almost always horn on these English blades. I can see why---it's a beautiful material. The phosphoric wrought iron was just right to give a contrast with the bloomery steel. I also got a subtle hamon along the edge, thanks to bloom steel's shallow hardening metallurgy. While I enjoy pattern welding, I love the natural patterns in the bloomery steel even more. I got into bladesmithing because I love the wild irregularities of preindustrial iron and steel; it never gets old.
    1 point
  4. Although I specialize in Roman Swords and Scabbards from 300bc to 4th Century ad, I am looking to branch out and sway off my regular trail and make a few historically accurate Rome knives, not Pugiones. If you have any reference materials, research information, drawings or photo's of Roman Knives, Utility, Folders, fixed blades and curved blades from 300bc to the 4th Century ad (Not pugiones) I would like to start this thread. I think it would be interesting to gather a group of people here... share... and maybe create some works on our own and post them here. This post is not just for blade makers, but for researchers, historians, those with interests in archeology and relics, lover's of Rome, and lovers of small historical knives and blades. One of the first Roman Blades I want to make is what I believe is a Friction Folder. (I have never made a friction folder and am open to advice.) I have pictured the type I am looking to make on my first round on this opening post. I usually work with 1075, 1084 and 1095 high carbon steels. These examples are of Zoomorphic (animal type hilt/grips.). Lions, Leopards, Panthers... I will be making the one of that has the opened blade with Camel bone as the handle/scales. So, lets have some fun and generate some interests from all walks of blade enthusiasts... and work to create some things together... What do you say? I'd be happy to submit photos of my progress as well. The Challenge is On! In His Service and Yours... --Patrick Rhema Creations LLC
    1 point
  5. OK, let's make some liners so we can get into fine tuning the action. I'm trying something new here and using brass for the liners. I had some 0.050" (~1.25mm) thick brass sheet lying around so I super glued the patterns to the sheet and roughed them out on the grinder. Now we have to drill some holes. It is very important that the holes line up perfectly. The position of the holes has to be within less than a thousandth of an inch if you want a nice clean assembly. How do you do that with a just a drill press? Easy... First off, you get one free move. You can drill a hole anywhere in two plates and pass a pin through them. It's only when you add a second set of holes that you get yourself in trouble. Let's start by centerpunching the pivot pin holes in each liner: You can see that I'm not perfectly centered here. No worries as long as there is enough material around the edge of the lines to clean things up in the end. Then drill and ream each hole to 3/32" (2.4mm) so we can slide a dowel pin through. Clean and deburr the faces of the liners that go together. Then super glue them together using the dowel pin as an alignment tool. You have to line up the other end of the liners visually. (There he goes with the super glue again...) Note that the pivot pin hole is not on the centerline of the liner. That means you have to keep track of the inside and outside faces of the liners. Now drill and ream the back spring hole, and slide another pin in before you do anything else. Yeah, I know it would be a lot faster to drill all of the remaining holes, and then switch over to the reamer. Trust me, super glue is evil and will let go on you when you least want it to. Put a second pin in now to keep everything properly aligned. Then you can drill and ream the rest of the holes. Strictly speaking, only the two spring pin holes and the pivot pin holes need to actually line up between the two liners. However, I find that having them all perfectly aligned is an advantage during various phases of the build. If you do this right, you will be able to put pins in all 5 sets of holes with no binding whatsoever. If you can't push the pins through with your finger tips, then something is out of whack. Now we are starting to get somewhere. Ignore the blade busing for now. I'll cover that a bit later. If you are following this tutorial, you are probably new at slip-joints. In which case I would suggest skipping the bushing all together as it isn't that important. If you don't use a bushing, simply ream the blade pivot hole to match whatever you are using as a pivot pin. Looks pretty crusty at this point doesn't it. Don't worry, it will start looking like a knife soon...
    1 point
  6. Kitchen knife in 15n20 and uddeholm 20c ....G10, mammoth and stabilized poplar ...blade is thin and light ... more pictures here : www.instagram.com/jacobsenknives
    1 point
  7. All you have to do is say no. Or double the price. We are not servants.
    1 point
  8. The big one went all banana on me in the quench so still working on straightening it through temper cycles. Also found this 18cm one in the grinding room I had completely forgotten about it is a good comparison to see how ridiculous the big one is
    1 point
  9. You do typically pull it through in one go, or rather, the machine grabs it and spits it through in one go. I'm not talking about the little McDonald-type rolling mills, I'm talking about the big industrial ones. With those you can design dies that are grooved such that the blade is forced to be straight and taper is pressed in as well. Somewhere around here there's a video of Wilkinson Sword making saber blades that way. Purely theoretical for most of us, I doubt one would fit in my shop even if I could afford one and the 480V three-phase to run it. Edit: Found the video. I want one of those!
    1 point
  10. Just be sure he knows to clean and dry it well, and give it a light coating of oil before putting it up. 1084 loves to get little spots of rust in the kitchen environment.
    1 point
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