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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/31/2021 in all areas

  1. Hi guys, I've seen some really black knife fittings lately, and I am curious as to the process of getting them that way. From what I could see in the YouTube video, the bladesmith lowers the parts into a thick boiling "goo" and leaves it for an unknown amount of time. When the fittings come back out, they're pretty much jet-black! Link: He talks about "bluing salts" at some point, perhaps in another video.. I don't remember. Anyone able to explain the ingredients of this "goop"? Sincerely, Alveprins.
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  2. A friend called me and said he had an anvil for me. I am so very grateful but I do wish it was just a bit bigger!
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  3. With any bluing salt mix you will have enough nitrates to make things interesting. Be sure not to spill any on any cellulose-containing items, like wood, cotton cloth, paper, etc. Nitrocellulose is a wee bit unstable. Also, the fumes will rust unprotected steel in the same room, so do it outdoors. This is interesting chemistry, but it can also put you on any number of watch lists, even though what we are doing is harmless. Be careful and keep it above board.
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  4. Rust bluing is nice, but it doesn't give you the deep dark shine of hot blue. You can get the sodium hydroxide? You can make your own potassium nitrate if you want. Or check sausage-making suppliers. Curing salt is often sodium nitrate... The potassium nitrate works just as well, but is not pleasant to make. Google "making saltpeter."
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  5. If your local or government laws are too strict on gun-related items, then try what's called rust bluing. It's a drawn out process, but the layer of oxide that builds up is fairly thick. All you really need is some type of mild acid, a damp box and a carding wheel. It's a process that is repeated over and over till you're satisfied with the layer of oxide. Go to YouTube and look up MidwayUSA. They actually have a fairly decent video on the process.
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  6. Also look at Brownells. I think they ship overseas to Europe and buying something premade gives you the assurance that it's premixed just right and ready to go.
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  7. I've no experience in this area, but what about room temperature blacking, like Birchwood's Presto Black or Caswell's Black Oxide Kit? https://www.birchwoodtechnologies.com/products/black-oxide/steel/room-temperature/ https://caswellplating.com/black-oxide-kit-1-25-gal.html
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  8. Bluing salts are used a lot in the gun industry. They create an oxide layer on the metal that helps protect it. The ingredients are usually potassium and sodium nitrates.
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  9. Small amount of work done today. Messing with the design some, don’t mind the doodles on the handle, just messing around, nothing finalized until it is engraved in the antler.
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  10. Another Satisfied Client... (With Explanation) First of all... this Sword is a Custom Made 1st Century Fulham Gladius that is Historically Accurate/"Inspired By." It is Historically Accurate in the Blade and Hilt Shape, Weight and Balance. However the Artwork on the Guard and Pommel are "Inspired By" Roman Mosaics of that Era and not from an archeological discovery. The grip is of historical record. The inset guard plate is made of brass and carries the family name which is engraved. The sword weight 1 lbs 8 oz. and is made from 1095 high carbon steel. The point of balance is 4.25" from th
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  11. Progressing nicely, looking forward to seeing the final product! Clint
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  12. *kitchensword Looking great but what are you planning to slice with it in the kitchen?
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  13. im really picky about miniatures and what is and isnt a miniature and i think that you did an excellent job at making a small scale pattern that would look great on small blades. its fine and crisp, there isnt any part that is too big or too small, you really do need to show the penny with it to show how big it is. and thats when i know something is "to scale". its very convincing, not a toy, not just a drop out of a bottle. it really makes me hopeful that i can bring something like this to my miniature work someday, i dont think ive seen this idea expressed in such a way,
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  14. Here is the video I recorded on making a kitchen knife from just a round bar - integral bolster and everything. Let me know what you think:
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  15. I have huge respect for this young man's skill and deep appreciation for the videos they put out https://youtu.be/smA0RsTV6EA The reason I wanted to share this, apart from the obvious brilliance, is how he cleans up the plunges on this knife. His whole method is strange to me, I take a blade to (maybe) 80%, then do the handle, then finish the lot in a few more uncoordinated steps Guess I cannot measure myself against a master smith, but I sure do aspire to do work at this levels someday....
    1 point
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