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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/03/2021 in all areas

  1. Got it finish ground and etched and getting ready for a handle
    2 points
  2. A local industrial electrical supply house might have some buss bar scraps they would be willing to cut a deal on. Edit, Jerrod beat me to it
    1 point
  3. Electric supply places may be able to help, too. Industrial bus bars can get pretty big. Places like Graybar may be able to get you what you need or point you to a local contractor that may deal in scrap components.
    1 point
  4. I don't have anything that thick. If nobody else can help, you can get a 6" chunk from McMaster-Carr for $25 and some change. https://www.mcmaster.com/8964K28-8964K285/ You have to add on for shipping, which unfortunately doesn't ever seem to be cheap through them.
    1 point
  5. Let me check this evening. I might be able to hook you up. I've got some I think is 1/2" x 2" I'll let you know in the morning.
    1 point
  6. I have a 5# copper scrap box from them coming early next week, I'll see if there's anything
    1 point
  7. Actually, in the long run, I find this helps a lot.
    1 point
  8. A few suggestions and observations. You are taking the coarse grits too far up on the bevel. Try taking the 60 grit up to a point where you have at least 1/4" of flat left along the spine. This gives you plenty of room to advance the bevel with the finer grits. Each additional grit moves the bevel further up and diminishes the flat by about 1/2 the distance left until full flat grind. So after 60 grit establishes the bevel, you have 1/4" of flat left. After 100 Grit you have about 1/8" left. after 220 you have about 1/16" left. The rest you can take out by hand or just blend it until it a
    1 point
  9. I agree with Geoff. I'd also add that it is easier to be precise with the higher grits. The issues you are seeing after 60-grit are easier to clean up with a 120 than with a 60. I do my final shaping at 120 grit with ceramic belts. Then I move to 220 AO belts and look for any dips and hollows that I may have to back up to correct.
    1 point
  10. Actually, those aren't that bad. You've got some 2" grinder marks, too much time spent in the plunge cuts. What you might try is starting each pas a half an inch to an inch away from the plunge, grind back until you bump it and take a smooth pass to the tip. You can fix it right now by carefully making a pass just in the area of the marks, trying to blend it into the rest of the bevel. You need to keep grinding until you've removed all of the marks from the previous belt. You're looking for a nice even coat of scratches at a given grit. If the blade is long enough, or you don'
    1 point
  11. Wiki has a little... Harpoon - Wikipedia, looks like it should be the "one flute" design. As you say, predating the toggle. There is also a decent article here: Lewis Temple's Real Innovation | New Bedford Whaling Museum: while it covers the toggle, it does spend some small time describing what the toggle replaced. There are quite a number for sale on Ebay you can go look at (they made lots of them once upon a time, quite a few have survived)
    1 point
  12. Ah, but WAS it die or dice? How many of the kits / projects did he make up incorrectly? Was it just this one or were they all incorrect?
    1 point
  13. Starting on the hilt: (The stainless frame will get split to accept the tang after I get everything drilled to match.)
    1 point
  14. So this was started a few years back 2018 as the last demo of the year. There was a little time inbetween but I was lucky to have filmed it all. The ax swings great.. In this one I finish up the preform.
    1 point
  15. I had a local videographer approach me about filming a mini doc, it was a passion project for him. and we fit it in around his other work, we started in Feb and were stopped for a short time by the lock down, but we found a way to move forward safely and got it done. he just finished the editing and did a great job on it. He filmed the making a mosaic damascus chef knife, from initial billet to final sharpening. We talk about what inspired me start, my business, my path in the craft and some of the why of my work. let me know what you all think.
    1 point
  16. So I was contacted by a fellow smith who is interested in forging their first knife.. I learned many years ago from some really old books that a preform is forged and this is used to forge the finished blade with no corrections either in geometry or width.. The blade is mearly forged to correct finished shape and thickness. Here are the videos.. There are 2: 1 long version with metal prep (smith has 5160 in 1/4X 1 3/4") preform and blade. And short version which is just preform, and blade.. Short version:
    1 point
  17. Long version: Metal prep to size, preform and blade.. Step photots.
    1 point
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