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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/07/2021 in all areas

  1. Hi All, just finished another bone handled Sgian Dubh capped with Sterling Silver fittings and a blood stone set in the pommel. Total length 20 cm, blade 10.5 cm. Pattern welded blade approx 400 layers. Leather scabbard also with Sterling Silver fittings.
    7 points
  2. These are mild steel (A36) with O1 edge. I try to avoid using A36, because I don't want any surprise hard spots where I need to file or drill. I originally sketched these with file work on the 1/4" square shanks. I switched to the twists because I wanted to leave some steel as-forged. The twists serve as witness to the heat of the forge. They also serve a couple other design functions. They provide a nice grip surface for a finger, and the bend in the shanks makes them look flexible. These are 7 1/2" OA, 3 1/4" blade, rust blued. This is the first time I've threaded on
    4 points
  3. I've gotten the blade to where I want it. Now to complete the hilt.
    4 points
  4. A gent asked me to make him a knife, he said I don't care what it is I just want you to make it. Well that's the kind of offer you can't refuse. I had this design on the drawing board for quite a while as the SOG recon Bowie is my favourite Vietnam era combat knife and I've always wanted to make one. I hoped I could do justice to the lineage of this iconic knife and give this commission what it deserved. The blade for this knife is made from L-3 high carbon tool steel which I cold gun blued. The blade is 180mm long and is 5.5mm thick on the spine, the overall length of the knife i
    1 point
  5. Blade: 1080 & 15N20 Handle: Blackwood & 416 stainless
    1 point
  6. 1080 / 15n20 Damascus by maker with Turkish Walnut handle and stainless fittings .
    1 point
  7. I know I haven't posted for a while, but now you're going to wish I hadn't come back. I called this knife the Gaucho. The blade core of this knife is 80Cr V2 high carbon tool steel laminated with 431 stainless steel with a Spanish notch at the heel. The handle scales are made from Juma super tusk which is a beautiful synthetic ivory with red liners held with two S/S Corby bolts and two stainless pins. The blade length is 180mm and the overall length of the knife is 305mm. The hand stitched leather sheath is dyed mahogany brown and black and has a front panel of crocodile leath
    1 point
  8. Gary, I signed in just to tell you how beautiful I think that dagger is. But please, after making me a Bowie "convert", please don't make me start liking daggers too!!!
    1 point
  9. Unfortunate that they had to get reinforced that way; thankfully no injuries! Safety is no joke, and it's definitely way too easy to get complacent when you've been doing work in a shop for years. Luckily, all this lesson cost you was a bit of pride and some money at the end of the day. Hopefully that MIG gun isn't too much of a hassle to replace! Good luck, and safe smithing!
    1 point
  10. Beautiful work, Mr. Richard.
    1 point
  11. Paint is traditional, as is just oiling it and letting it develop a natural brown patina. As for cleaning, a power wire brush, pressure washer, or careful sand/grit blasting all work.
    1 point
  12. On most marked anvils, the makers mark is on the side with the round horn to the right, but not always.
    1 point
  13. I actually got stuck on it for a bit ( IRL stuffs ) so its still sitting, but I should have it done completely this weekend, Door is built and just needs to be attached and then the whole thing wrapped in sheet steel and its done. doing it in 110v is not hard Brian, its just a matter of figuring out what your final amp numbers are and the building the coil to fit inside that amp restriction.
    1 point
  14. If you could identify a maker, that might tell you. Sometimes they were (US made anvils sometimes have serial numbers) sometimes not. Geoff
    1 point
  15. Hi Matthew: Glad you liked them! We sure worked hard to produce them. The last AF was in 2016. If you haven't seen the videos you can find them here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCONxF6KdMJN9ymPa2pT5S6A/videos I spoke to Michael Bergstrom (who did the video work for AF 2016) a while ago and asked if he would be up for producing a future AF, and his response was something like: "Abso-F***ing-lutely!" So, I hope we can produce another one someday. If we do another one, I think it will be more like AF 2013: An ambitious build collab with only a
    1 point
  16. Congrats on a great build. It is equal parts inspiring and intimidating
    1 point
  17. Theres a whole lot of variables there. The best place to start is by asking what steel are you using? That will narrow down temperatures and expected results. For simple carbon steels, it sounds like your temperatures are way to high. Which brings another question of, how are you measuring your temps? Never mind, Jerrod types faster than I do. Lol
    1 point
  18. I went to a small college that only offered engineering, math and science degrees. For a lark, I took a class on anthropology. It happened to be taught by a visiting professor who had never been to this particular college before. There was a fair amount of culture clash between the anthropologist, and ~20 smart-alecky engineering students. One day, very early in the term, the professor was explaining how it is hypothesized that homohabilis, or homoerectus (Or some people around then) were when early people started to have a concept of after life, or a circle of life.
    1 point
  19. I went back to 1.25" ball bearing of 52100 and have a good start on a hidden tang.
    1 point
  20. I got another pirate (grandson) with a birthday coming up next month and he's in need of a treasure chest. I've got most of the woodwork done: I made the boards from some very old white oak from my grandfather's barn (thus a few worm holes). I'm thinking about ebonizing the oak with iron acetate and doing brass hardware. Or perhaps white oak with iron hardware. Still have to think on it. I do plan to round the facets on the top.
    1 point
  21. A couple of safety lessons got reinforced the hard way today. First, the one that got ignored. Always pay attention to what's on your bench when MIG welding, and never blindly walk away without at least looking around first. Paper towel and an old t-shirt shop rag. My MIG gun. Secondly, the one that I'm glad I didnt ignore. Always keep a slack bucket or extinguisher handy in the workshop. I'm really glad i looked up from the forge when i did and noticed the smoke pouring from the shop. Thankfully no other damage, except the M
    0 points
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