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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/20/2021 in all areas

  1. Having had an increasingly difficult time breathing over the last year and a half (not Covid related, thankfully), I decided to sell my coal forge and switch completely to propane. I made a coffee can forge last summer and that's been fine for blades less than 2" wide and that don't require forge welding. I decided to make a forge that would have 2 ribbon burners. I'm going to put a valve between them, so one can be shut off and have half of the forge chamber blocked off with a fire brick. The brick can either be slid over or removed completely to accommodate bigger blades or larg
    2 points
  2. I started a new Damascus dagger project using low-layer count with thick layers of 1095 and 15N20. This is an end grain pattern, so I finished forging the billet, annealed it, and did my typical accordion cut. Some folks don' like the accordion cut method because it "wastes too much steel". I like the accordion cut because there is no visible seam between the pattern like you get with tiles. In the accordion cut, the pattern is continuous through the entire blade, In this particular billet, I cut it as close to a 45/45/90 right triangle as I could. You can
    2 points
  3. Several iron (but also flint, copper and bronze) tools, mainly axes, chisels from the first centuries of our era, based on bog finds from northern Europe.
    1 point
  4. Two knives, Bronze Age, Central Europe. The first one, cast entirely with five so-called pseudo rivets and a characteristic and unique tip of the handle in the shape of five bumps. Overall length 21 cm. Modeled on a copy from Satu Mare in Transylvania, dated around 1600 BC. The second, a bit later, Urnfield cultur, Germany, France, Poland. A charismatic knife with a sleeve handle. Overall length 23 cm, the handle is made of bog oak.
    1 point
  5. Hello! For a long time I posted nothing here. But recently made one sword with full finish and decided to share with you guys. This is replika of sword from Baltic, Curonian region. Full length - 68cm, edge - 56cm It is very light ~ 340g. Adomas S
    1 point
  6. It is dated for 10th century. Yes! It feel really good. A bit front heavy, but also very light.
    1 point
  7. i have a large file that someone else cut in half but it was a good old nicholson so i used a triangle diamond file to resharpen it and it was well worth the effort, it might take a couple hours on a file that big, it probably took me an hour to do 8 inches. recutting a file would take annealing, grinding, and then chiseling on new teeth which most files arent thick enough for. i guess thats why some old files are so thick. if you had a way to heat treat such a thing, you could make a file 48" long 1/2" thick and 2" wide for about $50 in steel and a shop made chisel. i
    1 point
  8. Ok, watch this. Tobin Neito from Stone Haven Knife works make a great stump anvil from what you have. I personally would have had that superquench boiling hot or had warm oil. Less chance of a crack happening. Notice towards the end once he is to black heat he is constantly running cold water over it to pull the residual heat out of the center. If you don't do this, it'll soften right back up. He gets the steel hard enough he gets a good 85 to 90% bounce off the hardened surface.
    1 point
  9. In fact, the anvil I use for 90% of my forging looks just like that, only longer. Unhardened 4140, 5 x 6.5 inches (12.7 x 16.5 centimeters). I have been using it for about six or seven years and the edges have upset a millimeter or so, easy to dress out with an angle grinder if I cared. Again, having all of the mass directly under the hammering surface more than makes up for the relative lack of hardness. My advice would be to try it just as it is for a couple of projects. I suspect that you will like it just fine. I mounted mine in a piece of tube and hammered some wood wedges in to
    1 point
  10. Finally got my bench cleared off and back on some knives. This one was fun, but glad to see it done. My oldest grandson turned six this weekend and I promised to make him a box for his treasures, so I decided to make this one as "piratey" as possible. I planed down a very old oak board from my grandfather's barn loft for the wood. I did an eleven piece top and then used a leather pad and 80 grit to make the top round. I was about to buy some sheet brass when I remembered an old rectangular planter I used to quench in, but I managed to open a crack in it and
    1 point
  11. Glad you're all ok - fires where they don't belong are just scary. I didn't get a lot of time to forge this weekend, but I managed two things. First, I returned to the O1/1075 to see just how bad it was. I cut out a section that looked to be completely welded, but it is every bit as useless as I thought: trying to shape it a tiny bit then letting it cool caused even more splits and some fantastic buckling. That is just not a combination to use Second, I revisited my "three layers of 1075" with the last thee pieces of that 1/8 thick bar. Did my
    1 point
  12. Thanks! Bronze ceremonial ax from Krottenthal, Germany, 1300 - 1100 B.C. The two magnificent weapons belong to the earliest discoveries kept at the Archäologische Staatssammlung (Archaeological State Collection). In c.1784, a farmer in Krottenthal in Lower Bavaria dug up and sold some weapons. Quite obviously, the weapons belonged to a depot find, but most of the pieces probably went to the furnace. At least it was possible to save two pieces. The axe was brought to the Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften (Bavarian Academ
    1 point
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