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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/27/2021 in all areas

  1. This one has been on the books for a little while and it's rather poignant that I've got to do this Bowie just after the legend that was Bill Bagwell has unfortunately passed away. The original style that I call the San Antonio was based on the Bagwell Hell's Belle Bowie. The blade for this knife is made from W-1 high carbon tool steel, it's 258mm - 10 1/8" long, it is 5.5mm thick on the spine and the blade flats have a brushed satin finish. The overall length of the knife is 390mm - 15 5/16" and the clip has been sharpened. There are three coined nickel silver spacers and the forw
    8 points
  2. I had a small piece of low layer count 1095/15N20 leftover from a knife I made years ago. I squared it up, twisted it, and forged this scissors. My scissors usually have a cutting edge welded onto a mild steel body, so this one presented some problems for me. It took a lot of force to align the blades. I tried to keep the shanks out of the quench, but I don't think I was entirely successful. I sharpened the blades before etching, but the edge is pretty rough after. I decided to post pictures of it like this because it shows the contact point between the two blades. There's a bright
    4 points
  3. This is a good example how vague plans have a tendency to go sideways I had made the blade with the idea of making a bushcraft knife. It's 15 twisted layers of C75 and 75Ni8. But rummaging through my wood shelf for something nice for a handle I remembered my box of boxwood and having recently gotten a set of fancy vallorbe needle rasps I had a sudden urge to try a barley twist. Let me tell you having nice rasps is amazing and they made short work of forming the handle. Hand sanding it smooth took a while though As this was turning out nothing like th
    3 points
  4. Well,the title is more of a click-bait...In actuality what i'm shooting for here is an approximation of the work by an elusive and somewhat mysterious Swedish maker,Stefan Ronnquist. He produced a few heads for the wood-carvers' market some years ago,just enough to get them poor carvers all stirred up and aroused,and then kinda vanished,in spite of all the interest in his product. Unfortunately i don't know anything about the man himself,only that he reignited my own lust for that general shape. From photos of his work i want to say that he worked them up from a solid mon
    2 points
  5. That's great looking work. I don't know why your dog would turn his nose up at it. Doug
    2 points
  6. Nice job on the handle, but the title pun is terrible!
    2 points
  7. Finally got the handle done on this one and now starting to think about a sheath.
    2 points
  8. Hi all Not been on here in along long time!! Yesterday I went to the bottom greenhouse to check on my overwintered Bonsai and saw two little furry fellas playing near the shed!, They ran and hid when they saw me but I stood still and they came back.. I couldn't get a pic as the sun was very bright behind me, I couldn't see the screen on my phone so I went in the greenhouse and snapped a couple of pics and a short video of them through the window! If anyone wants to view the vid it's HERE, It's only 11 seconds long! Cheers, John
    1 point
  9. A while back while browsing in an antique mall, a gentleman noticed I was carrying a vice & mentioned I should take a look at a couple he had in his booth. We struck up a conversation & I told him my wife, 3 boys and I were getting into smithing and in the market for a reasonably priced anvil. He really liked the idea of involving the entire family and said when we were done browsing to meet him in the parking lot. We finished up, went outside and located him standing next to his truck with the tailgate down and several smaller anvils peeking out the back. Long story short, we bought a
    1 point
  10. It starting to look like quite nice machine altough more like a little giant. I must disasemble this on tommorow and drill grease holes into the bones in the inner part so that they face up. I have mistakenly drilled them from the end and there is no room for terminal in the middle. It is really easy to set up now and it has good "whoop" feel. On tommorow I shal setup the guides vertically and weld the guides platen to the body of the machine. Looks like I will have about 7,5 (3") opening between the dies at the low crank position. I dont think the spanner will get loose, the central nut is
    1 point
  11. Hard firebrick isn't actually designed to absorb heat, just to withstand it without breaking down. Because of it's thermal mass it does not act as a good insulator (like soft firebrick or the ceramic blanket that Welsh has in his well designed gas forges. The heavy thermal mass in the hard firebrick both absorbs a bunch of heat before it starts to re-radiate it back into the forge chamber (which is what is supposed to heat the bulk of your steel - otherwise you could just use a torch in air) and also conducts some of that heat outside the forge (where it does no good for your stock).
    1 point
  12. Your fit and finish is excellent, sir.
    1 point
  13. Those are lovely! The discoloration looks to me to be an area that didn't get hardened. 1095 is good for that, consider it a bit of accidental hamon.
    1 point
  14. That looks like an incredibly useful design. Along the lines of what I call a "field knife" or a "hiking knife". Just the kind of thing you want to have for general purpose uses. Sort of like this one.
    1 point
  15. I have way too many projects going already along with very limited energy but last weekend I was working on a damascus billet I thought I was going to use for Christmas presents. Miscalculation in cutting it up left me with a piece of 15 layers that I thought I could just as well forge out into a bar and twist it for something. It ended up long enough that I decided give this a try. Cut a piece of 75 layers and drew it out to a similar length as the two twisted ones, cleaned them just a little bit before tack welding them and throwing them back in the forge.
    1 point
  16. It's the name of another FB page. It was created by the originators and mods of The Seax Files page. It seems the mods got tired of people posting projects that are not "historically accurate" and arguing over whether antler is a suitable handle material for a seax, when it is not supported in the archeological records, blah blah blah. Purist kind of page and ideology. It's OK, if that's your thing. Bjorn, I saw this knife on the fantasy page. Your latest three works are very cool specimens, fantasy or not. As you said "it's only fantasy if you let your imagination run wild" (
    1 point
  17. Jake! Long time no see. Good to have you back again.
    1 point
  18. And again, just to show that a knife can be defensive and save life in many situation with this thread that another poster started being This, the story of Harry Wollhurter - and his famous knife! being a prime example I have his book in my collection (Memories of a game ranger - - Harry Wolhurter - published in 1948) when I was a young kid, My grandfather read this story to me,everything in the story happened within a 100 miles of where I was born and grew up - and it's been part of my heritage ever since. In an adventure of unsurpassed courage, determination and survival, Har
    1 point
  19. I still can't help with the warping, but Billy is right, your normalizations and hardening temps are a little high. To get the best grain refinement you need to rock it back and forth across critical a few times, and with your steel combo that would be around 1450-1475 F. Try taking it to 1500, air cool to at least 700 and quench, then 1475 and air cool to below 700 and quench at least twice. Then harden from 1475. I bet you'll get grain so fine you can't even see it. You might lose a point or two of hardness, but you'll gain toughness.
    1 point
  20. demo video I did 6-7 years ago for NESM
    1 point
  21. Working in Coal I would use flux as well. Especially for odd shaped welds like hawk eyes. its is the consistent soak time at temp that is key to breaking down the scale, I don't know that i could do that in a coal forge with out burning up the work flux would shorten that soak time. in fact to long a soak when using flux and the flux will get full of crud and cause issues. MP
    1 point
  22. I take the mill scale off mild steel, and heavy loose rust off wrought, but that's about it. I don't tack, I wire. Since I work mainly in coal, I do use flux. Makes the clinkers easier to pull out.
    1 point
  23. The more billets I make, the more I believe this. I still grind the mill scale off the 1080 and the rust and pitting off my 15N20 flat stock (lumbermill bandsaw blades) using an old 36 grit belt before tacking the corners, but am gradually moving towards acting like this is an unnecessary step. But I still like the confidence this step give me during the welding. Here's more documentation about surface prep being unimportant:
    1 point
  24. So I have put the step lever into place, old torsion bar on the side does the movement. Its now set high, because I dont have primary wheel for the motor and the brake (wooden block) on the oposite of the motor mount is also not mounted. This should be almost horizontal on idle and should not take more than 1,5 cm to engage.
    1 point
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