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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/28/2021 in all areas

  1. Just a few quick phone photos of this one. O-1 blades, Nickel-silver guard, frame, pins, and large spacers around a smaller copper spacer. Stabilized and dyed giraffe bone scales. Blade is 7.125" long. 11.625" OAL.
    4 points
  2. So I got it operational. It really hits hard. It stands now on 4 pieces of wood not bigger than my palm, so I need to put something underneath. Also There are few small things to finish: 1) electric switch for the motor 2) To weld reinforcement on the square tube profile that is holding the guide assembly in its place 3) Cast the counterweight from lead and screw it on the back of the crank 4) Setup spanner for the pedal - the long shaft that is pulling motor needs to be adjustable. I m gonna use the same spanner like on the bones, just bigger diameter 5)
    3 points
  3. I had a small piece of low layer count 1095/15N20 leftover from a knife I made years ago. I squared it up, twisted it, and forged this scissors. My scissors usually have a cutting edge welded onto a mild steel body, so this one presented some problems for me. It took a lot of force to align the blades. I tried to keep the shanks out of the quench, but I don't think I was entirely successful. I sharpened the blades before etching, but the edge is pretty rough after. I decided to post pictures of it like this because it shows the contact point between the two blades. There's a bright
    2 points
  4. Awesome! I agree, could be a little bit faster, but it looks like you tuned the ram/spring ratio very well indeed.
    1 point
  5. "A blade that is hand filed to shape is never really flat, a bit of convex and twisting of the planes is almost unavoidable." My old teacher at the mechanics/locksmith tradeschool would beg to disagree "You like doing that, boy?" "Well start again and do it once more."
    1 point
  6. Looking good! As for layer count, you could blow some smoke up the Mall Ninja's behinds by counting every bottle cap as a layer. The mythical 6,000-fold steel!
    1 point
  7. I keep it vertical, leaning against the wall. If you are concerned about it bending, bolt a length of large-diameter PVC pipe to the wall and stand the bars in that.
    1 point
  8. I love the little touches of filework that you add. They really step things up a notch.
    1 point
  9. Do a search for micarta,I believe there have been a number of post about making it here.
    1 point
  10. It's a beaut,Joshua,look at dem clean harmonious lines of that blade...
    1 point
  11. Alex, that was basically what I did to fix the sides, which helped a bit but I think “milling” in the slots for the ricasso and spine to set down in actually made the gaps worse there. It’s silver soldered in place and I don’t think it’s coming apart anytime soon at least. Onto the next one, I’ve got a big chunk of brass and several hidden tang knives ready to be ground, so I’ll be focusing on guard fit up for a while. Thank you all for the tips!
    1 point
  12. Steve, that's outstanding work I understand the thong off the bottom of the sheath being an emergency retainer but is that stud meant to go into a frog attached to the belt. Doug
    1 point
  13. That is absolutely fantastic!
    1 point
  14. It starting to look like quite nice machine altough more like a little giant. I must disasemble this on tommorow and drill grease holes into the bones in the inner part so that they face up. I have mistakenly drilled them from the end and there is no room for terminal in the middle. It is really easy to set up now and it has good "whoop" feel. On tommorow I shal setup the guides vertically and weld the guides platen to the body of the machine. Looks like I will have about 7,5 (3") opening between the dies at the low crank position. I dont think the spanner will get loose, the central nut is
    1 point
  15. Oh my ! I like,.............. I like!! Superb workmanship!!
    1 point
  16. 1 point
  17. Steve, I signed in "just" to say WOW!!!
    1 point
  18. With brass guards, especially if the ricasso isn't perfect, I'll sometimes resort to the caveman method. File the slot slightly oversized, slip it in place, and then lay it on the anvil a beat it with a hammer until it deforms to the tang and produces a tight fit. Flatten out the face and then do the rest of your shaping. It works well with softer metals like brass and copper, even if it is a bit unrefined.
    1 point
  19. Trying to mill in a recess for the ricasso is a tough way to go. Much easier to keep the face of the guard flat, and nail the width of the slot to keep it tight on the sides. The spine and belly of the ricasso are generally wider than the tang, so you get a free pass on the top and bottom of the guard slot. (To an extent at least) I believe Joshua States has a couple of videos on guard fitting on his youtube channel Dos Gatos Designs. Even if I am wrong about the guard videos, he has a number of other videos that show some great fundamental techniques. You could do much worse f
    1 point
  20. Welcome Joe, it looks like you are progressing along just fine. There is a lot to like about that knife. Pick an aspect that you aren't completely satisfied with, and make that aspect better on the next one. Wash, rinse, repeat
    1 point
  21. If that first one proves to be too HC to forge, you can always run it through again with a slightly down-angled tuyere to decarb it. When you make the steel, you can do whatever you want! (This is how we hook you, you've been warned!)
    1 point
  22. This was in today's emails. It was part of an add for a knife sharpening service: What’s a Sexsmith? “Seax” is an old English word for knife. Other ways to spellit are sax, sæx, and sex. The word has found its way into places like “Essex, Sussex, and Middlsex.” A Sexsmith is what wecall a Knifesmith today.
    0 points
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