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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/29/2021 in all areas

  1. Well I got it finally, and weighed it. 200lb, have it pictures next to my friends 75lb nc farrier for scale. Really a beautiful anvil. Going to cut a solid oak log trapezoidal for a base and router out for the feet. Use some horse mat or something and bolt it all together
    4 points
  2. Spent the day yesterday in the shed with a young lady who wanted to make a knife... her first ever. She made two! I didnt get into forging with her- just stock removal with a good sized saw blade steel. She designed two kiradashi style blades, cut them out, ground, and finished handles on both blades- with my coaching and help... but did most of her own work. Two completed, sharp blades in about 6-7 hours. Was a cool day. Don't mind my mess... been working on, and in the shed a bit.
    4 points
  3. Just a few quick phone photos of this one. O-1 blades, Nickel-silver guard, frame, pins, and large spacers around a smaller copper spacer. Stabilized and dyed giraffe bone scales. Blade is 7.125" long. 11.625" OAL.
    2 points
  4. For my next big project I decided that I want multiple damascus Fleur de Lis inlays amidst some crushed "W" tiles. I want the Fleur de Lis patterns to be of damascus on a background of plain carbon steel but as they will be reasonably small & thin and normal damascus layers would get lost, I made some 5 layer billets for it. What you see here is approx. 1" tall and 5" long. These three pieces will get band sawed lengthwise so I can insert another flat 5 layer piece in between the halves for the horizontal band in the center of a traditional Fleur de Lis. Once I have the Fleu
    2 points
  5. It's all very unscientific My vinegar bucket probably started at 50/50 32% vinegar acid and water but that was months ago and I kind just add one or the other as it evaporates. It seems like it gets better the more I use it and dirtier it gets. If I remember correctly I dumped them in in the morning, left for an hour and then sanded lightly with 1200 grit paper and then left a few more hours before repeating with it the light scrubbing with the same now worn down 1200 paper. All in all probably around 6-7 hours. But it's basically just to the point where I can barely f
    2 points
  6. Nice one Joel. Always very rewarding to have someone come in and make something for themselves. I have a friend of my wife and me who has been coming in most monday mornings for about 12 months now. At the start she just wanted to see how a knife was made but it wasnt long before it changed and so far she has made 3 or 4 for hersef and one each for her sons. Still has a way to go in finish bevel grinding but has paitence and is slowly learning.
    2 points
  7. Working on the tsuba. I started by casting a 250g puck of shibuichi to cold work. Following Ford Hallam's recommendations, I used "one and four" silver to copper (20/80) rather than "one fourth" (25/75), as is more usually suggested. That's a pretty ugly ingot, and I suspect Ford would be appalled ... Good thing I cast much more than I need, as this will require serious cleanup. The beginning of a LOT of filing and scraping... Once I reached a clean surface, I started cold working to proper diameter and th
    2 points
  8. Hey everyone! I want to acknowledge right away that what I'm doing here is questionable and very much non-traditional. In truth, I'm not quite ready for the challenge of a traditional blade made in a traditional way, but I hope to get there someday. This project aims at taking what I learned from a wakizashi I made last year and attempting to 1) not make the same mistakes again (only new ones are allowed!), 2) improve on the technique I've been learning and developing for this particular style of blade, while 3) also aiming for a greater challenge. This katana's constru
    1 point
  9. Hi. I just finished my latest project. It is a replica of an early medieval (Viking Age) spearhead. It is a reconstruction of the find from Ciepłe (Poland). It is completely made of bloomery iron. I have used 3 kinds of materials: soft low carbon iron smelted from hematite ore, high carbon steel I made in Aristotle furnace, and high phosphorus low carbon iron smelted from bog ore. The socket is a wrap and welded. The pattern-welded twist bars are welded on both sides of the spear core. To weld twist pattern billets I used high carbon steel and P-iron, cutting edge is steel, socket and core is
    1 point
  10. Hello, im just asking if Arctic Fire is still going on? I absolutely loved watching the first year and i bought the dvd and the cool poster that come with it. And the second was really amazing watching everyone struggle to build that master piece. Also nice to see im not the only person who ends up doing antler fights with the drunk buddies. I noticed with the explosion of forged in fire the desire of bladesmithing has exploded as well but it felt like a lack of spirit of the content. I have watched the first year from time to time just to listen to it while working just for the
    1 point
  11. Fine, thus the rating for gas. Actually, most people don't use a sealant on the parts that get hot. You don't need it for the gas jet, especially if you're using a MIG tip. If your burners and lines are getting hot enough to burn you on the end away from the forge, you have a bad forge or burner design.
    1 point
  12. Wow, looks great! You're planting ideas in my head...
    1 point
  13. Where's Geoff's popcorn emogee????
    1 point
  14. Beautiful Josh!
    1 point
  15. That little touch of file work on either side of the copper spacer is going to have to go into my bucket of stolen ideas.
    1 point
  16. This should be fun to watch. I'm tuned in for the ride.
    1 point
  17. Ambitious indeed, but you can do it. Dunno if I could, but you can.
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. Shared a table at a local market with a fellow maker from the coast, actually sold 2 older knives that I thought would end up being gifted to somebody. Got myself in the workshop yesterday, and turns out I shouldn't have bothered.... Tried to make a kydex sheath for a gutthook, frustrating learning experience ........and broke the spring of folder #4, taking me from 33% failure rate up to 50%
    1 point
  20. There's a lot to like about this one. I love frame handles and that giraffe bone is real nice.
    1 point
  21. So I got it operational. It really hits hard. It stands now on 4 pieces of wood not bigger than my palm, so I need to put something underneath. Also There are few small things to finish: 1) electric switch for the motor 2) To weld reinforcement on the square tube profile that is holding the guide assembly in its place 3) Cast the counterweight from lead and screw it on the back of the crank 4) Setup spanner for the pedal - the long shaft that is pulling motor needs to be adjustable. I m gonna use the same spanner like on the bones, just bigger diameter 5)
    1 point
  22. Much better explanation dan... I have a difficult time getting whats in my head expressed in words. Thank you.
    1 point
  23. Aiden sorry I took your thread in a different direction with my first post. Sometimes you see something and you have to run with it before you have a brain fart and it is gone!! When I first got into knife making I had an adopted mentor. I adopted him not the other way around. He makes pretty much traditional knives. And he knows the history behind them better than anyone I know! His name is Wick Ellerbe, http://www.wickellerbe.com/gallery/index.php?action=showfull&vpic=200&gll=1&tpic=66&maxp=71 Sadly due to me doing less and less in knifemaking these days due to m
    1 point
  24. I take the mill scale off mild steel, and heavy loose rust off wrought, but that's about it. I don't tack, I wire. Since I work mainly in coal, I do use flux. Makes the clinkers easier to pull out.
    1 point
  25. My absolute favorite parts of Arctic Fires have been learning of some neat little aspect that I wouldn't have necessarily learned about otherwise. The Niello segment is a prime example of this. I also love that there is always a bit for everyone. The basics of draw filing, smelting from ore, pattern development, crazy ornamentation (niello, hilt component casting, stone setting, carving), blade design (Peter Johnsson's lecture, for example), sheath/scabbard making (design, construction, leatherwork), final sharpening/polish. Some of that has already been covered, some is as yet to be seen
    1 point
  26. I thought about this with the whole pandemic complexity related to travel. What about making the project in 3 or 4 different places with maybe 2 artisans at each location? It would mean separate filming crews. or the film crew has to travel, but all the artisans could attend each session remotely via Webex, Zoom, or Teams apps. Location #1: Making the steel. Here the ore is smelted, or iron is refined into the usable ingots, or billets. This product then gets shipped to Location #2. Location # 2: Making the blade. Here the raw metals are worked into a usable blade, ground t
    1 point
  27. Hi Matthew: Glad you liked them! We sure worked hard to produce them. The last AF was in 2016. If you haven't seen the videos you can find them here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCONxF6KdMJN9ymPa2pT5S6A/videos I spoke to Michael Bergstrom (who did the video work for AF 2016) a while ago and asked if he would be up for producing a future AF, and his response was something like: "Abso-F***ing-lutely!" So, I hope we can produce another one someday. If we do another one, I think it will be more like AF 2013: An ambitious build collab with only a
    1 point
  28. Hey everyone! I'm working on a kind of general Viking woman's knife. I drew inspiration from a bunch of different types of seaxes and knives, and distilled it into what you'll see here! It's maybe not quite a seax, but I don't think it's just a knife either. It's being made for a friend of mine in Iceland who gifted me some really amazing material when I was over there last year. She asked for 'a simple viking woman's knife' and I think I may have missed the mark on the 'simple' part, but it is what it is! I'll attach a bunch of photos like usual and maybe some reference I used fo
    1 point
  29. I wrote this article as a reply to all the "I want to be a bladesmith" or "can I be your apprentice" enquiries I recieve. I wanted to put together a more comprehensive answer to send to people. Its mainly aimed at the UK where our resources are a lot more limited than in the USA. The general gist is pretty much universal. How to become a Bladesmith by Owen Bush Here are some ideas if you are keen on getting in to Bladesmithing. I get a lot of people asking me how they can become a bladesmith or sword maker. Many enquiries are often asking whether there are apprenticeships
    1 point
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