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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/05/2021 in all areas

  1. To add to the post, the felling axe on the left is ca. 1790-1830-ish, the one on the right is ca. 1850-1890-ish, and the hatchet is ca. 1820-1850-ish. All professionally made. The difference between a lathing hatchet and a shingling hatchet is the width of the blade (shingling hatchets are wider) and the step ahead of the eye, which only occurs in lathing hatchets, as they were not used in the same way as other hatchets.
    3 points
  2. First time trying for an integral bolster. The blade shape is fairly unconventional... I'm not going to pretend that was all on purpose It's a very thin blade (for me anyway, distal taper to 1.4mm at the spine) and I let the heat get away from me at the grinder, so I had to do some re-profiling (it was originally wider and more triangular). It's growing on me though, and although I'm sure a chef would let me know in no uncertain terms why this is just wrong, cooking with it sure puts a smile on my face Mushrooms and parsley are my two favorite ingr
    2 points
  3. Nice little scope! I have a 260mm F4.5 Dobsonian reflector (about 1.5 meters long!), a real light bucket. No good for photography since it doesn't move, but it was cheap and it's fun. Haven't used it in 20 years, though... In that case, come on down if you want. We're relatively harmless, for the most part.
    2 points
  4. The one in the middle is a lathing hatchet. Kind of like a shingling hatchet, but with a longer hammerhead end. They were used to split and nail up lath (thin boards) that was used as the substrate to apply plaster over for interior walls. Same as the more modern plaster-and-lath wall, but instead of buying pre-milled small lath, they used to split a thin board off a section of log cut to the correct interstud length. The really early lath wasn't split all the way apart, and was pulled apart to open it up. This is called accordion lath. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lath
    2 points
  5. Hi guys, I've been working on this little side-project for the past week - and thought I'd give a little sneak-peek. I've decided to go with a new makers mark for myself. This one is the first one of it's kind - and is in a deep relief with copper inlay. In the future all my makers marks will be 24k gold inlay. (still in the mail unfortunately...) Thought I'd give a shot at a dagger - and finished the blade in it's entirety today. about 40 hours work on the blade. (not including pattern welding. Had a bar lying around...) Have
    2 points
  6. My understanding: Most of the time foxes hunt at night. However, if need is there, such as feeding kits, they will hunt in the day. My experience has been dawn and dusk. What I've learned to do, is not let my chickens out first thing in the morning, instead wait a couple of hours. I work at home and my shop and the chicken coop are next to each other, so I'm generally around during the dusk and that also helps. Other then hawks and dogs, nothing else hunts in the day.
    2 points
  7. So speaks people without chickens :-)
    2 points
  8. Here are two astrophotos that I took. The beauty in the night sky goes unrealized my most.
    1 point
  9. It looks like the forge weld was successful aside from the edges. 1084 jacket with a 15n20 core. Can someone advise me about the edges?
    1 point
  10. I *love* moon photos! An advantage to having a DSLR with lenses is that you can get wide field shots. I am close enough. I have a friend that attends y'all's events.
    1 point
  11. 1. Always plug around the burner entry with some kind of refractory. A bit of kaowool topped by clay is great. 2. While you see it a lot, top-entry burners are not a good design for this among other reasons. 3. That forge only needs one burner judging by the size, that may account for some extra heat as well. I bet if you plug the gaps most of the issue will be solved. Until you shut down, when the burner tubes will act like chimneys and heat it all up again. But the gas will be off, and if you have a quick disconnect fitting at the valve you have nothing to worry a
    1 point
  12. Here's to hoping there are no microcracks in the used springs....can't wait to see the final product.
    1 point
  13. If you missed seeing this live: Check out the video on the NWBA YouTube site when it becomes public on the 25th of April. Dave gives a couple of ways to work with this, one of them new to me.
    1 point
  14. I got out to the shop to have a try at my new 6150 stock this weekend as well. Didn't notice any significant difference forging it from other high carbon steels, though I was getting some pretty aggressive scaling, so I may have been forging at a relatively high temperature. Here is the rough forging (1.5" x 0.25" stock): Also did a snap test on a small sample of the same piece of stock, approximately 1/2" long with a shallow cut at the 1/3 mark. Thermocycled roughly and quenched twice into Parks 50 at an orange heat (first time didn't seem to take). Very tough even aft
    1 point
  15. I don't have a power hammer or a press, and I'm a software developer so as you can imagine I'm just not the strongest guy on the block. For me, something that isn't too stubborn and stays workable from bright yellow-orange all the way down to "just barely glowing" is a huge plus. Maybe the 5160 I got from Jantz is wonky but when I've used it, it only moves at all when it's super hot, and then only a tiny amount. The cleaver I made from it took two weekends of what seemed like endless cycles of "heat it as hot as I could, hit it six times, then back in the heat again." Forging th
    1 point
  16. This weekend, I assembled the stand and got my new grinder set up. It's a huge improvement over the frankly horrible "multitool" grinder that bolted to the side of my bench-grinder. That caused most of Saturday also being cleaning the garage to make a space for it to live. My elbow is also still being a bit twitchy, so I limited my forging to finishing up a dagger made from a file of sorts, and trying out some of the new 6150 steel. The dagger: (shown alongside a hardie-hole punch I welded up today too.) It was a very weird file: 14-ish inches long and a
    1 point
  17. So, finally got a chance to work with one of the 6150 bars. I've started a machete-inspired blade from one of the 1.5 x .216 bars: Personally, I found it MUCH easier to work with than 5160: it responded well to my hammering when hot, and it moved well even without being blazing hot - no need to be at welding heat. I found the resistance to hammering just right to allow for really good control for someone still on the early part of the experience curve, like me
    1 point
  18. Hearth furnace Run 3 - Experimenting how to load 100 bottle caps at a time per charge. First idea was to load them in paper sacks and toss a sack in per charge. As is often the case, theory falls short when put into practice. As soon as the paper went up (obviously very quickly) the bottle caps scattered far and wide across the top surface of the charcoal. Trying to herd them back to the middle while trying to get a charge of charcoal on the top didn't work out very well. Final puck looks like this spark test very uniformly across all surfaces. Only i
    1 point
  19. Pretty happy with the finished products, especially since it's the first time with 1095 and Kirinite (sorry for the picture orientation, weird quirk of posting from my phone). The hardening seemed to go well (used a magnet to test temp) and I found a sheath from SMKW that fit the camp knife perfectly.
    1 point
  20. Whoever took these and for whatever reason, it shows Gods Glory in the Heavens.
    1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. Very true. I hate the thought of having to kill a fox, but they rather enjoy killing the chickens. I have one now that my wife has seen a couple times eyeing her hens. She had it dead-to-rights with the "on top of the refrigerator pistol", but I had used it to shoot some mistletoe out of a tree before Christmas and forgot to reload it. All she got was a "click" and a condescending look from the fox.
    1 point
  23. Are you sure it was one of the older ones? I used an older Peddinghaus that size at the New England Blacksmith school and it had the hardest face of any anvil I've ever experienced. The teachers there said that even with students whacking on it for years it hardly showed any surface damage from miss-hits (unlike other anvils in the shop). I've heard that post Ridgid takeover they aren't nearly as good.
    1 point
  24. Here you go Josh, it starts on the second page. JJ and I have a very similar routine when it comes to belt choice. I use Gator belts quite a bit, all the way from A45 up to A160. They are expensive, but I like them because they can be resharpened in about 30 seconds, which makes them have a looonnngg life. If you like belt finishes I would recommend them. Also, no matter what belts you get, get some layout fluid, and when you are switching up grits, paint the blade in it. Doing this will allow you to see the grind marks of the previous grit super easy so its easier to get them out
    1 point
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