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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/06/2021 in all areas

  1. Well... that was fun. Just came in from shutting down the forge for the day. I think it was a good call. Have the new refractory to re-line her anyways. But, I cut, stacked, forge welded and cut my first "feather" pattern attempt. Remains to be seen how it holds up.
    2 points
  2. It's the First time for ages I've managed to get into my workshop, New job ,cold weather,my wife And I caught covid,but this evening I started to make a folder ( my First folder) marked out the blade, liner's And spring,drilled the hole's And cut the part's out only to discover I picked up the wrong pieces of steel for the spring, I've cut it out of mild steel,,I must get out of the habit of hording all those "useful" offcuts. Tomorrow I'll re cut it out of sping steel
    2 points
  3. Just a small suggestion. Don't make the shoulders for the guard so large. Cut out a mostly triangular tang with a truncated point. Have the tang gently slope up to the shoulders. Make a pritchel hold down. Weld a piece of angle iron to one end of the billet. Stand up the billet with the angle iron on the anvil face. Apply the pritchel hold down to the angle iron. Use a hot cutter in one hand and a hammer in the other.
    2 points
  4. First time trying for an integral bolster. The blade shape is fairly unconventional... I'm not going to pretend that was all on purpose It's a very thin blade (for me anyway, distal taper to 1.4mm at the spine) and I let the heat get away from me at the grinder, so I had to do some re-profiling (it was originally wider and more triangular). It's growing on me though, and although I'm sure a chef would let me know in no uncertain terms why this is just wrong, cooking with it sure puts a smile on my face Mushrooms and parsley are my two favorite ingr
    1 point
  5. FWIW, I think AEB-L tastes different than 1075. Not sure about O1. Also not sure I could tell the difference blind...
    1 point
  6. @Jaron MartindaleI think I follow what you are saying. With what I have pictured in my head, I think it would have a hard time holding the motor on a consistent plane without making thins overly complex. I might be picturing it wrong though....... @Bill SchmalhoferI had played with that idea. With the rear pivot point design, you would have to leave a bit of slop in the motor bracket where the head of the bolt passes through. I'm afraid it would end up being in the same boat as the original design and not quite sturdy enough. After wasting waaay too much of my bosse
    1 point
  7. @Alex Middleton, I am horrible at describing things but I'll give it a go: What if you got rid of the spring. Make the hole on the arm slightly oversized so the bolt spins freely and hold the arm at the top of the bolt with washers and a double nut. Then thread the base plate so the arm moves up and down by screwing it into the base plate. That way the motor and spindle are at a locked fixed height based on how far up or down you have screwed the bolt and don't bounce. You would have to add some blocks underneath to account for the travel of the bolt. You would also have to angle the hole
    1 point
  8. I am rarely, if ever, mechanically inclined....so this may be a dumb idea what if instead of a hinge and bolt mechanism, you used a bolt on either end, threaded into the base, and tighten/loosen simultaneously as needed to lower or raise the abrasive...? Use two nuts on either end of the plates to prevent loosening/tightening as the machine vibrates... as I write this I wonder about how strong that would be and if there would be rotational or shear forces(?) that might bugger the bolts....
    1 point
  9. I hate to be a negative Nellie, but I bet you are going to be very disappointed with the results for a few reasons. As already mentioned, the spring-loaded pivot design isn't a good basis for grinding. It will lead to a "Washboard" pattern on your stock because the motor/drum assembly will bounce up and down as the stock passes underneath. Adding more force from the spring is not the answer as you will ultimately stall your 1/2HP motor long before you stop the oscillations. What you have designed is more of a power sander. The drum will be under a mostly constant for
    1 point
  10. Yeah, I don't disagree. I would love to build something with a bit more rigidity, but the budget isn't going to allow that right now. My hope is that the trampoline spring will produce enough downward force to to allow it to grind somewhat efficiently. If push comes to shove I can always add a couple more springs to increase the tension.
    1 point
  11. Those pics are superb!! I bought a 200mm Orion reflector scope off fleabay, It came with a few lenses and an equatorial mount, I looked at the moon not knowing that the filter that said 'Moon' should have been fitted, It almost blinded me!! I bought a T ring adaptor to connect my dslr and then it got put away in the loft!! I tried taking a few pics of the moon but as it has to be set to manual, I have to focus but can never tell whether I have the focus correct, I have to take twenty shots moving the focus slightly each time!! I bought the 500mm lens cheapl
    1 point
  12. A heck of a first start, but the design has a problem. You have the grinder assembly hinged on one side. Instead, it needs to move up and down in relation to the table, but with a solid mechanical mechanism that doesn't allow for movement once grinding starts. As you have it now, there is a good chance that the bolt and spring assembly will allow the motor to buck up and down slightly, not grind smoothly from one side to the other. Maybe instead of a hinge, think of the motor moving up and down on guide rails, with a heavy piece of all-thread to the side or back to move the motor up and down,
    1 point
  13. Cool idea. You will need some way to move either the motor, or the work table up and down in very small (think thousandths of an inch) increments. Is that what that screw on the left is for? For an extra $85 or so, you could replace that drum sander with a contact wheel, Take that drum sander wheel and use it as an idler wheel (or buy an actual idler wheel). Then put the idler wheel on a tensioning rod above the contact wheel and use your 2x72 belts.
    1 point
  14. Really nice work Josh
    1 point
  15. Well, put it this way. I took 8 knives to show Ray. 1 of them was passable (even though it had something that was not a "failure" but would "cause me problems"), 4 of them needed small modifications. The other 4 were not worthy or just had things that would "cause me problems". I spent today working on 3 of the 4. One of which, was that dagger from A tale of 6 Blades. That came apart today.
    1 point
  16. Whoever took these and for whatever reason, it shows Gods Glory in the Heavens.
    1 point
  17. 1 point
  18. The ol' long arm of Amazon... I'd be glad to see it shortened a bit. My JJ tongs are still going strong! I highly recommend getting a set if he's still making them.
    1 point
  19. Nope. No you do not, you lousy spam-farmer for Amazon. Get thee gone from here. Sorry all, fake name, posting from Ludhiana, Punjab, 141015, India, trying to get you to check out a link that increases hits on Amazon affiliates. We do not allow such indecent crap here, and in fact I may send a cease-and-desist to Amazon. Not that they care in the slightest, but they just lost me as a customer for anything I can get anywhere else.
    1 point
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