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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/09/2021 in all areas

  1. Hi. Recently I've finished a really exciting work. I've put it also on my blog: https://lipinskimetalart.blogspot.com/2021/04/brunewyrm-stream-serpent-wijacy-sie.html Brunewyrm – the owner named it like that and this means in old English “Serpent Stream”. The seax successfully landed in the owner's hands in Tennessee :) I forged the blade out of several elements: a serpent of 21 layers of soft and hard steel (S235 x 80CrV2) twisted in a classic “rope”. It winds between old fibrous wrought iron, and on the spine there is also a layered strip, but without twis
    4 points
  2. A descent result for the day. Took them out of the clamps this morning and they are in the andle rack waiting for leather this afternoon
    4 points
  3. If only! This forum is, barring personal instruction by someone who has done it, the best resource I know of. There is a Facebook group for it too, with many of the same people, but I don't do FB so I don't know what's there. Look up every thread on hearth melting, Evenstad hearth furnaces, Aristotle furnaces, finery furnaces, etc. Mark Green, Emiliano Carrillo, Lee Sauder, Jesus Hernandez, these are the names to look for.
    2 points
  4. I've received some great advice here, and I want to thank you all because I was able to make a thing that actually seems like a purposely built knife that mostly looks like what I intended it to look like! 1075, ebony, and padauk. I definitely learned somethings. I hammered the profile and hammered in the bevel then finished it up on a belt sander. I actually ended up heat treating it twice since after the first one I decided I could refine the shape in the forge more, so annealed and went back to work. I was much happier when I finished up the second time. From there I learned an
    2 points
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  7. No reason not to, but why would you think you need to? The reason for quick disconnects, is to allow you to quickly disconnect the fuel lines for the fuel source. I don't have them on my tanks, but my tanks are outside, so if I every had a problem, I would go outside and turn the tanks off. I have worked in a couple of shops that had them, the first had quick disconnects at the point when the fuel lines entered the shop, which was right next to one of the fire exits and where we had a fire extinguisher. The other was a requirement of the Charlottesville fire department. They came by and s
    1 point
  8. This got me curious so had a better look at the knife itself. It also shows hints of these patterns in the plain steel. And a side note I had never thought of before. I drew the temper in the bolster area back enough to be able to file it and it reacts completely differently to the vinegar acid and gets much darker
    1 point
  9. Wow, I am in love with that pattern, not to mention the workmanship you put into that one! The serpent pattern is outstanding!! I have had to go back to the top and look again, and again, and again!!
    1 point
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  11. Really digging the pattern, Thanks for sharing.
    1 point
  12. Nice! Very well done indeed!
    1 point
  13. Wow. Very well done. And thanks for the construction pics.
    1 point
  14. Possibly the final update, Owen and Tod have made a video about the sword. I'm sure it will be interesting to a lot of you!
    1 point
  15. @Kreg Whitehead,I think you need to cut back on the caffeine! Warning, this stuff can become addictive. Alan wasn't lying about sucking you in. It's just hardwood lump charcoal. I've been buying 33 pound bags of Cowboy hardwood charcoal at Costco. If you run furnaces sequentially, you get more bang for the buck as you don't have the waste getting it started and a bed of coals made. It took only a little more than 2/3 a bag of charcoal for my last three runs. I'm debating trying a run using anthracite coal sometime here (or at least mixing some in with a ch
    1 point
  16. I always find this tutorial by Cashen very helpful. http://www.cashenblades.com/damascus.html
    1 point
  17. I would vote too cold, not enough soak time at heat, or a combination of the two. (oxidising atmosphere in the forge as a distant 3rd in the why did it not weld conundrum). Forging pressure is a consideration, but Ive dropped billets before on the way out of the forge, when everything else has been good, and they are welded when ive picked them up!
    1 point
  18. Hi guys, I've been working on this little side-project for the past week - and thought I'd give a little sneak-peek. I've decided to go with a new makers mark for myself. This one is the first one of it's kind - and is in a deep relief with copper inlay. In the future all my makers marks will be 24k gold inlay. (still in the mail unfortunately...) Thought I'd give a shot at a dagger - and finished the blade in it's entirety today. about 40 hours work on the blade. (not including pattern welding. Had a bar lying around...) Have
    1 point
  19. I'm with Alex on this. I think your heat is too low.
    1 point
  20. Yeah, I remember that video. This is the one that finally pushed me over to the fluxless side. Thanks for re-posting.
    1 point
  21. Yes they were carved from one piece body and neck until somewhen in 17. century they started to be built more like modern guitars,because much less wood is needed. They can be tuned in variety ways and have lots of strings I did this one GDAD (and double strings) for easy playing. It basically mediaval looking Irish bouzouki - which I think is real sucessor of the citterns.
    1 point
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