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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/29/2021 in all areas

  1. I just finished up these two. The first is the finished By-Knife from that longseax billet I haven't finished yet.... Copper alloy bolster, deer antler spacer and scorched ash handle. My lame attempt at carving something. 5" blade, 10.25 OAL The next one is another cubic inch challenge, except that it started as much less than a cubic inch. Sambar stag handle, 410 Stainless hardware. 3.25" blade from point to face of guard. 7.75" OAL I have wanted to try this thing where the butt cap is filed to match the antle
    5 points
  2. Would you please slow down? You're giving me some extreme self-esteem issues. But seriously, very nice work. You continue to amaze me.
    2 points
  3. Most of you know that I work from templates a lot. This is no exception. Take your frame template and scribe the perimeter on the anvil face with a soapstone or white charcoal pencil. Now forge the twisted bar to match the drawing. I have space in front of this for a spacer package in the knife design. Now lay the template over the forged form and make sure the form is at least a little bigger than the template, and all the pin holes will pass though the steel. You can see two small delams in this photo. I got lucky though. The upper one is not too de
    2 points
  4. In another thread I showed the beginning steps in creating a Damascus frame handle. I figured I would post the rest of it as I do it. The first steps I showed in the other thread are to forge out a twisted bar of low layer (7-15) and flatten it to about 3/4" wide and at least 1/4" thick. Now the reason most people use twist is to have the stars show on the outside of the frame. The stars are located in the center third of the bar. So the easiest way to get them outside is to split the bar lengthwise. If the bar is long enough to make the entire profile of the fram
    1 point
  5. Jaro is right, as is Gerald who posted while I was writing. A lot depends on what you want to do with it. Air hammers are better for use with tooling, since they have a greater open throat height between the dies. Mechanical hammers are faster at drawing out because they run faster and deliver a harder blow per ram weight, since the ram is accelerated by the springs on the way down. I have a 50lb Star mechanical, formerly Don Fogg's personal hammer, because it came available when I had the cash. It's a good hammer, but the throat space isn't great for use with tooling. For drawing out bille
    1 point
  6. And this one was a bit of an experiment. San mai 115crv3 core with 75ni8 cladding. Forged very thin and a fuller on the right side for food release. Ebony and copper for the handle. Grinding such big flats without overheating was the biggest challenge
    1 point
  7. Both look excellent. Nice carving... not lame at all. If you don't mind my asking, how did you get the butt cap to match the antler so precisely?
    1 point
  8. Take my response w/ a grain of salt as I am relatively new to this (started last fall, took a 2 week ABS intro to Bladesmithing class about a month ago). I've been very happy with the IR thermometer. When I've used it to check temp for normalization and hardening, I've ended up with really tight silky grain structure. I've also used it to check temp in my forge and I've been able to get readings upwards of 2400 degrees. When I've soaked bar stock and checked temp of forge and then pulled out the stock and checked, the temp has been consistent, so I have decent confidence in the accuracy.
    1 point
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