Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/17/2021 in all areas

  1. I started working on the tsuka (handle) core a while ago, I just couldn't make much progress until some of the fittings were further along and I knew my final dimensions. With the fuchi done, I was able to resume some of the work. Here I'm adjusting the fuchi-side to size, using the first knife I made a few years ago And with that, the handle is back on hold. For the kashira (buttcap) I started by making the punch and die jig. This was straightforward but not pretty. I used a die grinder for most of the die work, and I'm sure I'll
    6 points
  2. In the 18 years or so I've been on the forum, you're only the second person I've seen make shitodome, and your explanation and process pics are much more clear than the first guy some 17 years ago. And stop laughing, guys, it's pronounced something like "Sheeto-domeh," not what you're thinking.
    3 points
  3. Seeing as how I'm not seeing any references to kitchen meat slicers in the last page of this thread, I'm thinking he's a spammer. Maybe @Alan Longmire can confirm one way or the other.
    3 points
  4. Haha, I've never actually made any. From my understanding over the years, you can spend as much time learning to make the perfect crucible as you would spend making the steel. To me it is just too much of an added variable whilst trying to reduce thr amount of variables possible. silicon carbide crucibles while expensive are a necessary cost. The assurance that it's far less likely to expel its contents so as long as you know when enough is enough with them is well worth it. The cost of making a new furnace kinda outweighs the savings jn crucibles to me. It's also easy. You buy it,
    3 points
  5. And I am all done! I am really happy with how it turned out, the whole build went really smoothly. I bought a new file guide and almost immediately my guard fit improved a lot, it is still not totally perfect, but quite close. This is all takedown construction without a single drop of glue, though the guard doesn´t come off without removing the threaded rod. The low layer damascus was a pain to finish, in the end I removed all the oxides and went for a silvery gray instead of contrast. This was my first time working with stainless, and it really is pain t
    3 points
  6. 1 of 2 big blades being made...a ~300mm suji. After HT, auto hamon. Cleaned up on grinder and on to stones.
    2 points
  7. If only Congress would agree with my suggested justice for spammers and anyone to do with the robo-call industry: Forcible organ donation for every offense. That would both benefit humanity and force the perpetrator to think long and hard before doing it again.
    2 points
  8. Yep, total spammer. Deleted with extreme prejudice.
    2 points
  9. Hi guys, I was going to put the finishing touches on my latest dagger yesterday, but had to give up as the steel frame and spacer had apparently work-hardened from being dead soft, to between 55 and 60 HRC after being worked on by angle grinder and belt grinder. Is this even possible? I glued the handle parts together, and then started removing surplus steel from all angles as I honed in on the final handle shape. When I started engraving the graver point kept breaking again and again, after not even 1mm if cutting. I then noticed how my scribe
    1 point
  10. Not sure if it will work here Faye but hair-spray will remove permanent marker from UPVC window frames. Test on a small piece of bone first.
    1 point
  11. Daniel is spot on regarding the effort i5 takes to chase the ceramics. I suggest you start with quality crucible and make good steel....if then you think you want to play with clay go for it.
    1 point
  12. Start with the family jewels, when applicable, so they can't reproduce.
    1 point
  13. Day-um Faye, sharpie marks or not, that is looking really good.
    1 point
  14. Uh-huh, sure that's how you say it. Will you write a note explaining that to my IT manager when they find it in my search history? Francis, dude, you are really starting to piss me off. Your work is fantastic, and covers such a broad range of techniques. I am truly impressed!
    1 point
  15. Ooh, sorry about the Sharpie marks! Bleach won't do it, and can cause the bone to crumble over time. You can try acetone or lacquer thinner, taking care not to get any into the epoxy. It's possible that salon-grade hydrogen peroxide (40%) could do it, but it'll also take your skin off. Acetone is the cheapest and least dangerous. Wear rubber gloves and use it in good ventilation.
    1 point
  16. Looks like a nice place to live. Living in the flatlands of the US, I get a bit jealous of hilly scenery. I chuckled at the "Walk-Through" hedge you neighbor has over his walkway. Looks like something I would do.
    1 point
  17. Welcome to the forum, Lucas. Allow me to suggest looking at the date of the initial and last post of a thread before responding. This conversation started 16 years ago and the last post was almost 13 years ago, so I'm pretty sure this topic is long over for those involved. Also, clicking on a member's name will allow you to see the last time they logged on to this forum, and neither the initial poster nor the last person who responded to this thread have been active on this forum for the past 7-8 years. This is referred to as necro-posting and it's usually better
    1 point
  18. Thank you Garry for sharing a nice picture of your world! I thought the area would me more arid dry - like but is lwell settled and It reminds me of a place in Pennsylvania I live as a small kid. Small and rural, rolling hills, well kept homes of working people. Now I’ve seen some photos of your shop and you tube as well. I wish I had your space, so my hats off to you for planning and achieving all the way back to 87. Now that I am retired, need to down size, warmer weather is a must and a nice out back shop. So we have been looking at many options and this takes time and travel wi
    1 point
  19. Ok, It's nowhere near done but getting the shape as close as I did to my sketch makes me happy.
    1 point
  20. Annnnd that is a new milestone for me.
    1 point
  21. Thank you for the pin No pressure
    1 point
  22. Lots of long etches in ferric chloride is the safest. The best is to leave it out in humid salt air for 50-100 years.
    1 point
  23. As someone who actually had to calculate the potential energy generated by a coil of wire passing through the earth's magnetic field, I personally feel the forces involved are so minute that they would be completely overshadowed by the "Real" variables in quenching. The forces inside the steel as it cools are many orders of magnitude higher than the magnetic pull of the earth.
    1 point
  24. Hello All! It has been quite a few years since I have been involved in the Wootz community. Not due to lack of interest, but due to health and not having an area to work. From glancing around the pages, it seems that there has been quite a lot of experimentation from all over the world, with some very nice looking results. I am gearing up to do a lecture and demonstration over here in Australia for the guild on Wootz production, and was thinking I would like to take the pulse, so to speak, of Wootz making around the world. If you all don't mind could we: 1. Make a list Wootz make
    1 point
  25. Jan: The steel looks good. For Niko's movie download "VLC Media Player." It will open and play almost every format known to humanity.
    1 point
  26. I thought I would share this paper from Klaas Remmen, Thanks Klaas! It is a really good write up on the Georgian Crucible Steel process. The process is from Zaqro Nonikashvili. Good work Klaas and Zaqro! It is well worth a read. LINK Summary of process in paper: GEORGIAN METHOD: Crucible Charge: - Take one clay crucible, divide low carbon iron or pure iron charge (300g) in four equal parts, place two parts of the iron charge in crucible - Cover with layer of sand or crushed glass, - Place 10mm layer of charcoal on glass - Place one part of iron on charcoal - Place on
    1 point
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...