Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/01/2021 in all areas

  1. Joshua, wow I picked up some valued information from this thread! I have never seen another maker in person. What I have learned in my knife making has been self-taught and gleaned over the years from knife forums! Believe me when I say the self-taught can be the most frustrating. IE, screwing up a knife at the last minute. Or having an idea of how you want to do this procedure and a year later you just happen to see a thread or video and think. Oh sh!$ that is ten times easier than the way I did it! Imparting knowledge unselfishly is one of the greatest attributes a maker can hav
    2 points
  2. I finally have some time for knife making and one of the things I've been working on is making more hearth steel. I want to get enough for a tanto, which has been somewhat of a challenge because of a persistent problem with carbon distribution in the initial pucks, more on that later. On the suggestion of J. Arthur Loose, I got a used HVAC blower (an Amatek Windjammer) to replace the shop vac I was using. Definitely a fan (), it's quiet and powerful and the setup wasn't too bad. With a DIY three prong plug and a 0-10V DC power supply it was ready to go and offers very precise
    1 point
  3. Can't help with a commercial heat treater, but here's how I settled on a steel when I started using stainless for folders and small hunters: I read all the reviews, and did a lot of research at www.knifesteelnerds.com, and used a few knives made from assorted super-steels. From this, I went with AEB-L. 14c28n is a similar heat treat and probably a little better, and that is the equivalent of Nitro V. Those three you can do in your shop if you have good heat controls. They also have very small carbides, with AEB-L having the smallest. This translates to easier sharpening and polishing afte
    1 point
  4. 1 point
  5. I tried to do some further net research on the "carbon steel" referenced- to no avail... that was literally the only one I found online. Sounds like a worthy project to try. Good luck with it!
    1 point
  6. Thank you for the kind words @C Craft. I do threads like this for two reasons: I hope someone can use the information I present to help them along the way and I also hope someone gives me a better/simpler way to do it! I don't worry about losing business to anyone. I don't really have any business to loose. I am not a fulltime maker and most would consider me to be a hobbyist at best. I've just been at it a while now...... Anyway, I make more money in my day job as a building code guru than I ever hope to make at knifemaking, so I can afford to part with my "secrets" (most of them anyway)
    1 point
  7. @Welsh joel, your google skills are amazing! I played around for an hour the other day trying to find something like that! I even emailed WU but haven't heard anything back from them. "Carbon steel" is still pretty vague, but way more than I could find. I'll give it a heat to decalesence and quench it and see what happens. I told him the logo wouldn't survive. Thankfully he's pretty realistic about the whole thing and is just happy to have a chance at having his knife back. Thank you sir!
    1 point
  8. Re-doing the heat treat is going to kill that logo etch as well... but make it usable again. Found this online.
    1 point
  9. Welcome aboard! First and foremost: DO NOT TRY TO LEVEL THE FACE OR "FIX" THE CHIPS! Anvils are not precision reference flats, and a bit of sway is actually better than dead flat because it's much easier to straighten things. Steel bounces back a bit, even when hot, so laying a bar across a shallow sway and whacking it will make it straight the first time. This is not the most important reason for not ever taking steel off an anvil face, particularly an old steel-faced wrought iron anvil like that old beauty. The real reason not to mess with it is that the steel used for the fac
    1 point
  10. My wife is a city girl... and 20 yrs older. She doesn't fish. We have a pond. She doesn't do crafty things. I have a forge, a vinyl plotter, laser engraver, woodworking tools, etc. She doesn't shoot. I have a backstop, 30 yds and a few toys. She is the people person, I'm the introvert. Opposites truly do attract. Lol. 27 years I've tried to get her interested- no dice. So to me, to have a spouse or partner interested and willing to join in on the fun- is amazing. Congrats and good luck in joint projects.
    1 point
  11. Well, I really cannot believe it has been this long, but I finally did a test run on this puppy. Starting the fire was its own learning curve, but I got it lit. Once it was cooking pretty well we started to heat a big piece of 14 ga, sheet to raise a birdbath bowl. I was the shop boy and tended the fire while Liz did the shaping and forging.
    1 point
  12. OK, I've been tempted to post these for the last few years every time one of y'all start bragging about your fishing prowess. I literally caught these two fish back to back a few years ago. Keep in mind that I live in a region where a body of water over an acre or two is called a lake First a mighty bluegill: Then a massive large mouth on the next cast... Do you have any idea how hard it is to set a hook when it is bigger than the fish
    1 point
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...