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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/11/2021 in all areas

  1. The hawk is approx 19" long x 8" with a 2" cutting edge. The main body is made from 8 bars of twisted pattern weld with approx 20 layers in each bar with a 400 layer cutting edge. The smoke bowl is made from 9 bars of twisted pattern weld arranged in a 3x3 cube and worked to shape then hard silver soldered to the main body. Many Thanks to Alan for supplying the Curly Maple haft which I have treated with Aqua Fortis to bring out the figure and banding. The wooden beads are Californian Buckeye and Redwood and the smoke hole stopper is Buffalo horn.
    3 points
  2. This could also go in the Fiery Beards humor thread, but I figured I would post it here in case anyone starts thinking about doing this. So there I was sitting at my table at Blade when this couple comes up and he starts talking knife making. I always entertain discussions about the art, especially with younger makers, but this guy really set me off. He wants to show me his work and share his processes. OK. I'm game. Then he starts telling me about multiple quenching cycles for 1095 and I'm like, huh? Didn't we go through that 15 years ago? So I ask him why he does this and he says "grain refinement" looking at me like he doesn't believe I already know. When I ask to what end? He replies edge retention and increased toughness. I kind of lost it. Then he drops the name of someone who is a fairly well known and respected individual and says he learned it from that guy. Because I like all you guys, I'll share his other secret about the double quench on 1095. It seems that if you leave the edge at 60 thousandths, and the spine over a 1/4", you will get 1095 to auto-hamon!
    2 points
  3. In my experience, there is no tool of less use in a blacksmith shop than wolf-jaw tongs. They're actually more useful if broken, as then you can use one half as a poker. I'm convinced they were invented in the 1990s as a way of separating newbies from their money, as you never see them in old smithing books. They can be made to work if you reforge the jaws to fit the specific stock you have (and indeed you're supposed to do that with almost all tongs), but they're sold as a one-tong-fits-all, and often made from 4140, which makes them picky about being quenched. /oldmanrantmodeoff/
    2 points
  4. Well... the mail man made some deliveries today. Got new wheels for my grinder, and some quench oil that took a month to get after I ordered it.
    2 points
  5. One of the reasons to have a decent radius on the edges of your anvil is to use those in combination with the a corner of your hammer to mimic fullers on both sides of the bar. Something like this: Not sure what your forging experience is, but here's a picture I got from another old thread that does a good job explaining how metal will move under the hammer:
    2 points
  6. After you get a few hours on it you should start a review thread in the Tools and Toolmaking section. Then update it after a few months to let us know how it still stands up. Hope it kicks ass for you!
    1 point
  7. I've been doing it in coal for the last 23 years, and as Billy said, others have been using coal (mineral coal) to forge weld for a thousand years. Charcoal, about 2800 years. If your setup is not good, you may have problems, however. You'll need a deep fire. At least two to three inches of coal (four to six of charcoal) under the steel, and another inch of coal (two of charcoal) on top. All burning, of course. Let's see what you've got, and in the meantime I'll move this down to the Beginner's Place where it belongs instead of Show and Tell.
    1 point
  8. It's been done for at least 1000 years, so yes, it's possible. No tips from me, though.
    1 point
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