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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/01/2021 in all areas

  1. I had 2 goals for this design. I wanted to leave the shanks and bows as-forged, and I wanted the scissors to close without having to close my hand. The blades are mild steel with O1 cutting edges and rust blued. I've decided this style - bows created by bending the shanks - makes more sense for my shop than the punched and drifted style I had been making. Scissors have lots of surfaces to finish. This design eliminates the grinding, filing and polishing of the bows. It also lets me easily change the size and shape of the bows. To avoid sharp corners, I forged the shanks round befor
    6 points
  2. Given the generally short exposure at lower temps, I wouldn't worry about it too much, just from a potential diffusion standpoint.
    2 points
  3. Here is the newest builds. The longer barreled upper is a .300 blackout whith a 9 inch barrel. The shorter one is a 5.56/.223 7.5 inch barrel. The both use the same bolt carrier group and lower. So all I have to do is pop out 2 pins change out the BCG and charging handle and put the other upper back on the lower and push the 2 pins back in. All can be done in under a minute. This is the 5.56 right at dusk.
    2 points
  4. My first attempt at a hidden tang knife. Many challenges. Many things learned.
    1 point
  5. It's been a while since I've posted anything so I thought that I'd show you one that I just finished for the Arkansas Show: The blade is a two pattern mosaic of 1080-15N20 & 1084 powder. The guard is a wheat twist made from four 1/4" round rods (hot blued). The handle is mastodon bark with 416 & damascus spacers.
    1 point
  6. I've tried a variety of pivots, both rivets and screws. My first pivoted scissors were bonsai-type, so I used a rivet. Typically these scissors have conical copper or brass washers on the rivet. I initially thought the cone shape was acting like a belleville washer to apply some spring force. What I now understand is that the cone simply lifts the head of the rivet off the scissors blade so peening the head doesn't expand the rivet in the hole in the blade. The rivet is also an axle, so it needs to fit nicely in its hole. Most scissors don't use any spring force to hold the blades together. Wh
    1 point
  7. I've been wondering what you've been up to. Immaculate as always!
    1 point
  8. I am assuming the plans I used are still free of rights so there you go. Sayber SR2.zip Sayber OSG DC1_11-4_long_platen.dxf Sayber OSG Assembly Instructions_r2.pdf
    1 point
  9. Oxidized iron acetate, probably? I only see it form at the surface and only if the steel is exposed to the air. Pretty cool!
    1 point
  10. With the arrival of a replacment package I had the blocks of resin ivory that I could then cut into scales for this set of knives. Everything was prepped and then into the clamps for the night in the house as there are too many for the usual light lamp in the shed. The three on the right are for another order so cut the scales at the same time although they will wait on their turn to be finished. scales drilled and all cut to shape with the front edges sanded to 600grit and ready for the handle finishing buff And all in the clamps Not sure if these ar
    1 point
  11. This is a lovely first knife, much better than a lot of first knives you see out there! Congrats, you did very well!
    1 point
  12. 1 point
  13. The more you use it the more the more ideers you will get on how and what to do with it. One deep ass rabbit hole it will be.................
    1 point
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