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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/14/2021 in all areas

  1. This was a fun diversion between knives: Made this for a guy at work. A little forging and a little welding. I only have a Lincoln stick welder, so I used some 1/16 rods. Man, I need a MIG.
    4 points
  2. I'd like to share two rapier hilts I've made during the past year. I practice historic Italian rapier (techniques of Capo Ferro primarily) and so it's a pleasure that these are being used in practice. I did not make the blades on either sword, however, I'm realizing I cannot find a blade that I am fully happy with and so am preparing to make one to my own specifications in the near future. Maybe I'll post here of my progress on that when I start. The grip on the first is Irish bog oak. On the second is ebony. The second hilt utilizes a few old fencing blades in the design as per t
    2 points
  3. I should have mentioned that my hammer sits directly on my 4" thick concrete floor and after a couple years I have seen no issues.
    2 points
  4. My tiny anyang 33lbs has a 1.5 x 3ft footprint and hasn't seem to have damaged my 3 inch concrete garage floor after two years of moderate use. I do have 1/2" thick rubber padding under the base, but unsure how much that really matters. For reference, ymmv, ianal
    2 points
  5. Introducing......the mammalian protuberance pommel.
    2 points
  6. Last night I did a little prep work for a young man that wants to try forge welding cable. Got him a piece cut and welded to a work stick. The rest is up to him for learning... lol. The other bits are going to be a "scrapmascus" attempt. Figured I'd challenge myself with the 3/8" wide pieces I'd had leftover.
    1 point
  7. Hello Everyone, My 15-year-old kid and I built a forge. It doesn't have any IHT or ITC or the like in it yet. Still, it easily gets up to 2200F. I took pictures at 1200C (2192F). Bottle with angle iron feet Pieces to mount burner and burner tube Drilling mounting brackets Tapping mounting tubing, but will also weld nuts on to give more thread and support. Forging/swaging little shims Shims holding mounting tubes in the the right places.
    1 point
  8. I too have raised my hammer on 6x6s for the same reason Alan mentioned. Putting a pad under the hammer will lessen the impact because the pad is absorbing some of the impact. Just like having a pad under your anvil. If you want to get the most out of your hammer glue it down with an adhesive silicone calk. I was given this advise by Dean Curfman, the builder of Big Blu hammers.
    1 point
  9. I would definitely be interested. Maybe I could load up the hammer on the trailer and bring it down for the weekend I have a neighbor that owes me a favor for doing a welding job and I'm sure I can get him to load it for me with his skidsteer. If you do a smelt I have hundreds of pounds of iron sand.
    1 point
  10. My 88 lb self contained hammer has a footprint of 2 foot X 4 foot 3 inches.
    1 point
  11. I think that is the prudent decision, Adam. To me, the question that needs answering is which would be worse, having an extra foot of room or having to cut out a foot of already existing floor?
    1 point
  12. Here's a link to a thread on another forum that really jump-started my journey into the knifemaking world with a lot of jigs and tricks explained https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/wheelers-steel-stuck-in-the-metal-with-you.808140/ And that fact that posting links to other sites is OK proves to me that this is a great forum that values the sharing of knowledge over egos!
    1 point
  13. Save the 4x36 for wood, especially with the usual belt selection. You can get good belts from trugrit abrasives, but good files move metal faster than a 4x36. Those also don't have sealed bearings, which means they don't last long around metal dust.
    1 point
  14. The inspiration for this was an old cleaver my grandpa had in his kitchen that was his grandpa's. It was most likely made by a country blacksmith. The spine was dented and banged up from being hammered through pig and cow carcasses the handle butwas chipped and worn but it was still usable and razor sharp. I don't know what happened to that cleaver but we decided to make one in homage to that old cleaver. We wanted it to look like a country blacksmith made it and to have small imperfections because we thought it would add to the over all look. The blade is 5160. The handle is Mexican desert ir
    1 point
  15. Had to do some fieldwork today. Not fun, but the temporary office space was nice.
    1 point
  16. Those are some real nice knives, the buffalo horn is great, and the tiny bevels well worth the effort.
    1 point
  17. Well, its all done and it was a hell of steel to move! Grinding took forever and it was tedious! Sharp as a razor and after tempering it is about 63HRC. What do you think?
    1 point
  18. Ok, so challenging to get good grinds after the handle is on. Lesson learned!
    1 point
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