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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/29/2021 in all areas

  1. Hi everyone, I just finished a tanto I had been working on for the last 3 weeks . The blade is W2, uchi-sori with a 7 1/2" nagasa, and the fittings are copper with shibuichi inlays. Here are the photos of the build: Profiling: Hardening: Polished: Now for the part that's really time consuming, the fittings: For this blade, I decided on a ginkgo leaf theme, a symbol of pe
    3 points
  2. Knife in pre-HT grind window etch. Made from bar 2 posts up.
    3 points
  3. We can always assume the sugar is important since it will provide a reducing atmosphere and coat the surfaces with carbon, both things that will help with a forge weld. I worked at a foundry once that would though a handful of sugar packets on top of the poured investment molds before putting a 55 gallon drum over it. The reducing atmosphere prevented pin-hole defects. I asked "why sugar packets?" and was told that they were cheap, easy, and readily available. Totally not related story, but it cracks me up every time I think about it. When I was fresh out of coll
    2 points
  4. So here is my first attempt at learning this art. I call it “The Reclaimed” because its made from all reclaimed waste metal. The steel is a high carbon steel I believe it to be 1080. From part of a train coupler. The handle is hickory from a 6lb sledge that was thrown away. The brass pins are waste that was in the recycle bin. All this was made at my work. Super shitty grinders. They have bad bearings and the wheels wobble a lot. Limited choices for belts. There are quite a few flaws but having limited tooling to work with at one point i had to tell myself to quit chasing flaws or
    1 point
  5. Ameribrade 2x72 has arrived Tool arms get here soon. This will be a game changer for sure
    1 point
  6. Looks good Jaro. The 3-port diverter should work too, but I think the porting on these is usually set up to keep the combined area of the port openings fairly constant, which might limit the ability to throttle the flow and increase the backpressure. I don't really have much experience of those valves though.
    1 point
  7. Another cheap option, if you don't mind plastic piping, is to use a 3 port 2" swimming pool diverter valve. This will proportion the air between the two paths with operation of only one handle:
    1 point
  8. Congratulations Joshua so very well deserved. You can see just how much work has gone into this and what a commitment in time is required to pass the ABS tests.
    1 point
  9. This project has been a ton of fun, I'm glad some other people find it interesting as well! I will be away from the shop for three weeks starting tomorrow, but I got in one last bit of work on this. There's some left to do, but I ought to be able to wrap it up before the deadline. The sheath insert will be made from a piece of grey birch knocked down this spring by snow and wind. This hatchet I made a a while ago ended up a little thin in the bit, but it works pretty well for carving! The insert is made without a split using a knife and rip saw. @jake pogre
    1 point
  10. You are not alone in chasing nuance. I made six or seven just trying to get a form that suited a new kashira die I had made. I arrive at a example I find pleasing only to reject it a week later. I don't think this little game ends any time soon. I think your work is pretty impressive. I especially like your inlay techniques. Inlaying and producing a clean ground without surface texturing is no mean feat.
    1 point
  11. Beautiful! Nice, I will try a ring mandrel next time! In the past, I've used a stake I made, which has this flaring built-in (seen below in one of my ill-fated attempts, before I switched to soldering at the machi). This worked well on my previous piece, though not as pronounced as the examples you gave: But as you noticed, it didn't work so well this time, where my fuchi is mostly parallel. I'm hoping the ring mandrel lets me control this better, thank you for suggesting it. Similarly, my kashira is lacking a subtle curve at the bott
    1 point
  12. Shibuishi is an awful alloy for splitting seams. I'm not surprised you had some issues. One of the handy things about forming them in the round is that you can then work one edge over a standard ring mandrel to form a slight cone. When you shape this up it forms ' funbari', ( Stradle) , that is, the fuchi takes on some flaring at the seppa. It makes for a more subtle form than a simple parallel ferrule.
    1 point
  13. Very nice. Congrats. The dagger shows a hamon. What is the steel and is the hamon planned? I use a lot of W series and have never h/t'ed one without a hamon forming.
    1 point
  14. That will serve you well! It just takes a steady grinder, a steady hand (with a LOT of practice), and then if you need to tweak it go to drawfiling. I find that drawfiling is the easiest way to quickly crisp up a bevel that's a little wavy off the grinder. Of all these things, practice is what will get you there in the end. But there's nothing wrong with using a jig. It just limits what you can do on certain blade shapes and profiles.
    1 point
  15. It is a lovely set, and a real nice photo!
    1 point
  16. Those are really beautiful. Congrats on JS and the really lovely picture too!
    1 point
  17. Well done. Congratulations.
    1 point
  18. Thank you Josh! Actually, I did put a post in that thread - but it is a few months ago.
    1 point
  19. Congratulations! Nicely done, those are gorgeous
    1 point
  20. Congratulations Josh. That is a very nice set and the photo shows them up nicely.
    1 point
  21. Sorry: fat fingers. The bleed-off-excess-air method will work fine though. It just "feels wrong" bleeding off the majority of the air that you are compressing without doing anything useful with it (which is why I mentioned the air curtain). I don't think I've seen a real gas forge actually using more than about 18 CFM of air, which, if my calculations are somewhere near the mark, corresponds to between 5.5 lb/hr and 8 lb/hr of Propane use, though I'm sure some of the guys with big power hammers exceed this.
    1 point
  22. If you ever want to appreciate sand paper, I highly recommend doing a burl handle without it. This was fun, but definitely a challenge. Here are the tools I used for handle shaping. The knife is has an asymmetric grind and is long enough to hold with two hands, so I used it like a drawknife for a good bit of the shaping. In the middle is my scraper/burnisher for kinko work, which proved useful for sand paperless finish. I wrapped up the stone finishing with 300 then 800 grit water stones going lengthwise. I then switched to my oilstones to add the secondary
    1 point
  23. If it's 3-phase, and particularly if it can run on 230V 3-phase (where is Hobbit country by the way?), I'd be inclined to run it on a VFD. I tend to build my VFDs into IP65 enclosures with sockets on for things to plug into, so one VFD can run several different machines simply by plugging the appropriate one in. The controls are on a long cable, so I can move it to the appropriate machine. It doesn't make the VFD any cheaper, but it's a lot easier to justify the expense if it's something you can use for multiple purposes. The
    1 point
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