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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/04/2021 in all areas

  1. Grind a k-tip in, call it Japanese-inspired, and charge extra
    5 points
  2. Alright, so the Old Wedge is finally completed, and the pictures are all done! History: I wanted to commemorate the importance of hand tools through out history, and especially those which were made with the expressed purpose of breaking harder materials than themselves. In this case I chose to utilize a approx. 300 year old mountain wedge which has most likely been used for everything from splitting granite to securing personnel and equipment in the now closed Silver Mines of Kongsberg city, Norway. I imagine this old wedge lying in the overwhelming depth and darknes
    4 points
  3. So been a while, again.. covid has sucked for restaurants so haven’t had much time for knives but gotten a few done. On the plus side I’ve had plenty of time for research and development of my kitchen knives. first is Damascus in the 240 range. Old sledge handle for the wood. Going a bit thicker on the spine and thinner on the edges these days. Cuts like butter, still waiting to see how the Damascus performs in the long run though. got a couple more I’m gonna add in a second post.
    4 points
  4. I kind of, do/don't/maybe?! but now that I have gotten into forging them im beginning to turn on my study brain and I'm looking for more information. Alrrright, so we all know how Japanese hammers work so dang well, except I don't really...I have a "vague" understanding from experience. the tapered front heavy hammer delivers a stronger more concentric blow because of its mass distribution leading it to naturally exert more power on the fall, right? and what about the shape? how does it influence the work to use a round, square, octagonal hammer? when they're fl
    2 points
  5. This title may surprise some of you, coming from me as it is with my constant emphasis on learning to grind freehand. And I still think freehand is the best way to do large blades, and the only way to do certain complex historical grinds. Folders, however, are another story. They have to be precise, and it's darned near impossible to grind folder blades while holding them in hand, since they have extremely short tangs and get too hot to hold very fast. I was bumbling along with a make-do extended handle thing (basically clamping the little blades to a chunk of 1x3/8 flat bar),
    2 points
  6. You are a good person! Do wait until we've confirmed it is indeed happening, though. We've established the interest, now we need to confirm the venue and dates before we get into the nitty gritty of planning.
    1 point
  7. Also....this winter if our local Lowes has the bags of charcoal I was buying last winter for $7 a bag I will stockpile it and bring a bunch with us for the smelt!!!
    1 point
  8. What do you want to know? I like to think about the intricacies of the most basic tool ;) I have a nice collection of various hammers and I've made a few myself of different type, so I think I have some understanding of them. The main thing to note is that there is not one ''best'' forging hammer, and personal preference is important. I use multiple hammers for different parts of the blade. I actually don't believe that a forward weighted hammer hits harder than a symmetrical hammer of the same weight and handle length, the energy stays the same.
    1 point
  9. 1 point
  10. Good to see you back at it Justin. That's a nice looking piece of PW in the top photo.
    1 point
  11. I alternate quarters and nickels for more contrast. I press the nickels, cold, to the diameter of the quarters, then clean and alternate the quarters and nickels. I make a tool of 2 pieces of 1/2" thick 4" X 4" bar stock and drill holes in each corner for bolts. Stack the coins and tighten the bolts. Heat in the forge, watching for the stack of coins to begin looking "wet". Press to weld. Grind the edges to check the welds and clean the faces with a wire cup brush on an angle grinder.
    1 point
  12. damn, new tools almost never work that smoothly. good job. I haven't checked in enough. I knew you mentioned making some folders when I said they were the one thing that intimidated me. I would remake the Sutton Hoo sword before I would make a slip-joint or lock back. More chance of getting it right, too (not necessarily a lot, but more). Looking forward to seeing what you make. Registration for Ashokan Sword is open. Register and come see us!
    1 point
  13. Sweet!! Glad I checked in today and got to see these. Really nice work!
    1 point
  14. Another in w2, with the same wood handle but it’s since been switched to ironwood. Been using this one all week and feels really nice, cuts like a laser though it’s got a bit more heft than my last daily work knife. This one and the one in the last post were both differentially hardened, this one has a pretty nice hamon though I’m not really planning on polishing it. Feel like I’m entering a new phase in my knife making, back to where I started. Back then it was a desire for a nice Japanese Gyuto that led me to knife making.
    1 point
  15. What a lovely piece of work! The materials, colors, and overall design really work well together.
    1 point
  16. I'm gonna have to make me one of those folder grinding jigs. A buddy of mine was talking about getting his daughter a knife for her 8th birthday next year and he was hinting about a folder. Today I got some forge time in. Knocked out a few more kitchen blades.
    1 point
  17. Hi everyone, I just finished a tanto I had been working on for the last 3 weeks . The blade is W2, uchi-sori with a 7 1/2" nagasa, and the fittings are copper with shibuichi inlays. Here are the photos of the build: Profiling: Hardening: Polished: Now for the part that's really time consuming, the fittings: For this blade, I decided on a ginkgo leaf theme, a symbol of pe
    1 point
  18. HOLY $#!T!!! That is beyond impressive! I dont even know where to begin to start asking how you did all of that! I am just trying to keep my grinds even!
    1 point
  19. Is a 5.75" fillet knife a thing? Dammit, I thought I got this. Maybe went a *little* too far on the flexibility test. The grain is excellent, at least...
    0 points
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