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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/17/2021 in all areas

  1. First knife I've made in a long time. I made the material 5 years ago and it has been sitting around since then. The fit up left more than a little to be desired. After much frustration with a file I bit the bullet and ordered one of Bill Benhke's carbide file guides. I'm looking forward to using it on the next one and imagine it should save some serious headache not to mention time. Anyway, thanks for looking. Here's some specs: Blade length: 6" 1084 + bandsaw blades Nickel silver spacer + titanium pin "Maka" burl handle. (Honestly I don't know much about this
    4 points
  2. Bummer Faye, that was a nice piece of wood too. Look on the bright side. Now you can sell it as having a three finger handle!
    2 points
  3. What an incredibly moving story.
    1 point
  4. Its very old one and I want to restore it when I have a bit of a time. Its a bit of a beast, since it takes anything up to morse 4 and can drill a hole 400 mm deep in one go.
    1 point
  5. True! And I have that bandsaw as well.
    1 point
  6. If you want to do wildland smithing and water quenching, you're pretty much limited to low-manganese 1075 at the high carbon end. 1045 or 1060 work as well, and will have greater inherent toughness. There's a reason bladesmithing was never that kind of "one guy in the woods" kind of operation. Sounds like somebody with no historical knowledge's idea of "bushcraft," like batonning a knife through thick wood; i.e., a bad idea that was rarely if ever done in historical practice. Sort of like stainless. Did not exist at all until 1913, and not in a form suitable for edge tools until the later
    1 point
  7. That is a really cool drill press.
    1 point
  8. Bit of reorganisation to run that forge safely. Swapped the bandsaw with the drillpress (which is about half a ton). Moved the press to the right. I need to get rid over all that wood over grinding section too. And perhaps construct a duct over the forge just to suck the waste heat. I cannot make a hole in that wall, so it needs to go out of the window.
    1 point
  9. Note the absurd amount of reinforcement I had to weld over, just to stop it flexing.
    1 point
  10. Yep, what Jerrod said. Compressors sold for the home use market are the same way. Compare the current draw on the motor to the HP sticker on the side, and you will probably be disappointed. But, we digress...
    1 point
  11. I agree with Billy O. Get a little offset under that cross member under the jack and you are going to have a twisted press. I have designed hydraulic system in steel mills all my life and people don't realize the the TREMENDOUS FORCES that are sitting there just waiting to be released. 20 tons (40,000) lbs is a lot of potential energy just waiting to be released. Just because someone (I assume offshore)rated it a 20 tons does not mean it is designed for that kind of force. I laugh every time I look at my shop vac RATING 5HP I would like to know how anyone and get 5 HP out
    1 point
  12. Real sad, it was a beautiful piece... It is one of the reasons why I refrain myself from using burls and other brittle materials(think pine cone) for my hidden tang handles. Even stabilised it's not very sturdy. But perhaps if used on a framed handle with liners it would be strong enough?
    1 point
  13. Unfortunately, it broke right at the end of the tang, so I don't have a solid wood back any more. I was thinking of putting it back together with blind pins and a fiber gasket. If it survives some abusive testing I might even sell it.
    1 point
  14. 1 point
  15. After discussing it with a long time ABS Master I will be offering advanced classes where the student can pick the subject covered. If there is some part of your knifemaking skills that my 25 years of experience can help with then let me know. These will be one-on-one classes held at my home shop in Branson, MO and can be from 3 to 5 days in length.
    1 point
  16. The only problem with those is that the slide can slip unexpectedly. That's why Geoff uses a magnetic flap.
    1 point
  17. P.S. That's some Gorgeous scale/texture/surface,absolutely lovely...
    1 point
  18. Great job on that,Joshua,looks like it'll be a neat and handy tool. Looks like you turned those corners in a Weygeresque manner,i likes that!:)
    1 point
  19. Slowly making progress on this guy. I'm actually excited to see it all etched, but I'm trying to be better about making sure the finish is proper before I etch and show people, lol! We're at a rough 400~600 grit finish, still working the socket area to get it consistent. Pictured with potential sheath doodle designs... Also did a dry fit on a short handle. I figured the small scale of the spear head warranted something 2ft or less. This is a piece of Plum wood from about 6 years ago, it has a cool grey color to it towards the butt end, and finishes a very warm
    1 point
  20. Ok! Everyone’s Suggestions were spot on to get this weld to work! I was able to keep both sides attached MUCH better! The downside is I made a critical error in the design, and thinned the socket down to WAY WAY too little material.... SO ON TO THE LAP WELDED VERSION! So far this guy seems to be holding up like a champ! Took forging well, and heat treat good. it is wrought Iron and 1065 though instead of the antique spring steel I was using, so that could be a big part of the success... My plan is to rivet him onto the haft and mayb
    1 point
  21. I had a bad day in the shop. A spalted maple handle came apart in the knife vice.
    0 points
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