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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/30/2021 in all areas

  1. Just got these finished up. Clay hardened 1095 with filework and mustard etch, and a baked oil finish. Carved bog oak handles, with antler bolsters and pommels. Bog oak sheaths with leather throats, and copper clips for antler handled ferro rod fire steels. Commercial boxes with fitted foam lining. Went a little more rustic than usual, but I think I like them... Let me know what you think...
    6 points
  2. Well, after Liz's birthday lunch and some tile shopping, I got some forge time in. The bar got flattened out and I set myself to the profile shaping. Template on the anvil Forge the tip out and start the ricasso/tang area. Start spreading to get the width I need, and establish the bevels Draw the tang out fully and match against the template This one will take a lot of grinding. It will not be fully forged to shape. The grinds have to be deep enough to to relveal 5 bars on the face of the blade. I
    4 points
  3. put the finishing tutches on this bad boy before sharpening it up
    3 points
  4. My contribution to the craft today was to finish this handled butcher.
    2 points
  5. The guy onh FiF who used a paper towel was Ashe Cravenock. You may have noticed a wide load and beard also on that episode (takes small bow). Geoff
    2 points
  6. This from Geoff Keyes
    2 points
  7. My computer was having trouble accessing the site for the last month or so, but the Admins go me sorted. Thanks, guys. I was using Bitdefender as an AV and it turned out to be the problem. I'm back now, did you miss me? Geoff
    1 point
  8. Glued and clamped the backside plyw on the scabbard this morning and got the by knife close enough to finished to make a sheath for it so next is the pricker. As the current plan is for a relatively high status kit I went with faux ivory for the scales
    1 point
  9. In my experience, not letting the whiteout dry makes a sticky mess with whatever powder you're using and the other pieces in the can. I doesn't coat the can walls, so your billet sticks to the can, and it does coat the billet pieces, so you get poor welds on the perimeter. In the FiF episode (season 5, episode 25, if you want to see what happend) Ashe tried whiteout, didn't let it dry, and then tried to start his billet (time crunch issues). He began to realize that it wasn't going to work, dumped everything, and put a layer of paper shop towel over the whiteout, then stacked his can.
    1 point
  10. Are you talking about using paper towel, or canisters in general? How thick is the can stock? I've found that 1/8" (3mm) is on the thin side and 1/4"(6mm) a bit on the thick side. The 2 times I've used 3mm, the can burst open during the second heat and I wasn't able to compress the can significantly to avoid cracks when forging out the billet. The 2 times I used 6mm, the can was a lot harder to remove, but the billets were flaw free. I've used 3/16" (4.5mm) for one can so far and that seems to me to be just about right. One thing I learned from one of the forums (it might have
    1 point
  11. I like the ricasso that way
    1 point
  12. I have total faith in you and your ability to knock this out of the park.
    1 point
  13. Well the other day I finished up the post vise, today fit up a hunter and did some grinding
    1 point
  14. Cool pattern Niels! On my side, I am currently working on 3 knives. That's 2 more than my usual . The fillet blade is completed and the petty chef is nearly there. Also working on a copper bolster for a little blade @Zeb Camper sent me a while ago. I spend probably too much time on bolsters, but hey, I like that kind of precision work.
    1 point
  15. You can never own to many clamps Glued and clamped the front plywood sheaths today and will leave them clamped until morning and then put the back ones on. After much thinking and fitting I think I'm only going with one by knife and pricker as having a second knife would make the scabbard feel a little bit cluttered Milled a short slot on some scrap brass for the pommels and then a small hole to peen them in place. Might even go overboard and solder them in place as well. I don't want to spend too much time on them but they will still have to l
    1 point
  16. Finitiob ain't the funniest part huh? It's an everlasting battle...
    1 point
  17. Nice comments and thanks to all. I use West Systems GFlex epoxy 50/50 ratio. Colored with a dab of black acrylic artist paint. Brush it on or use a light piece of thin wood with some flex. It will smooth out quickly and it doesn’t run for me. The sprinkle with ground tea leaves gently being sure to get complete coverage, lightly patting if needed. This is 24 hour epoxy but I like to get it started in the hot sun, checking a few time to be sure nothing has moved. It gets rigid enough to handle in a few hours. I painted this black with Rustoleum gloss. (Yeah I know not at all professio
    1 point
  18. Well, like with so many of my projects this one has been patiently maturing and rusting. I progressed the guard a bit but have many file strokes to go. This was more difficult than I had planned.
    1 point
  19. The light rescue set is done with the 11/64 / 4.3mm 1075 nipple nosed knife with is 3 inch straight section blade (9 1/4 in OAL) for those situations where a point is not desired (seat belt or tight tie etc) The bare handle without scales is for compact carry while the radiused edges still give a good hold for comfortable use. The flat head lever made from 1/4" / 6.3mm 5160 has the screwdriver tip on the 3 7/8 blade (8 inch OAL) that also doubles as a stout lever for the situations where this may be necessary. The gutted parra cord wrap gives enough bulk and very good grip for serious use of
    1 point
  20. After the blade was boiled I waxed it and it really improved the finish. I began the handle idea I wanted. First forming a block into the shape which fit the blade, I shaped the handle to the final dimensions I needed. I then made the NS guard and pommel, which I left lightly sanded. I used what I call “redneck urushi” applied to the handle which also allowed a little museum finish at the edges, set the blade with west systems 24 hour epoxy. These are the final photos and I am pleased with the final product. I expect over time the handle will abrade some but I have handled this
    1 point
  21. When I’ve gone as far as I can in shaping by hammer, grinder comes next. I’ll use a plain bench grinder, to rough in the shoulders, blade shape and grind through the scale enough to begin some bevel. (Unfortunately, I missed these photos but I’ll substitute a few from the 1/2” cubed Knives)
    1 point
  22. A little side bar project spawned from this bar. I took all those little triangles and cleaned them up. Then I arranged them in a canoe with some 1095 powder. After welding the canoe shut.... I welded it in the press. I hot cut off the end and split the seam. Forged the bar out to about 1" x 5/8" x 8" long. Then a little surface grinding And a light etch This will make something someday.....
    1 point
  23. Got to spend some time in my primitive forge. The 3 inch hunter is for perspective 9 inch blade. 3 inch wide. Edge quenched Spine at 6 mm forged down to 1mm at the edge. Slight concave grind. Forged guard and Gemsbok horn handle.
    1 point
  24. By knives cut out, heat treated and are now tempering. The pommel profiled was way too heavy at 360grams. So chucked it on my mill again and shaved off both sides leaving a proud area on the front face which I'm hoping to manage some kind of flower motive on. Then back to the belt grinder to give it some three dimensional shape. As it is now it's still at 290 grams so might yet deepen the tang slot to remove a little bit more weight and as I'm thinking of rope filework on the tang I might extend it all around the pommel as well. Every gram counts Will also grind in ful
    1 point
  25. Thank you. The blade finish was hand sanded up to 800 grit and blended/polished with an ultra fine scotchbrite hand pad. Thank you as well. The guard is one piece. i milled a slot the width and rough height of the ricasso, filed the bottom square, pinned it and soldered it on. It was a serious pain locating the pins and I probably should have done that before I went to the final depth with the filing.
    1 point
  26. I know this isn't up to the quality of many of the blades I see here, but I am overall pleased with it. This was the first Bowie I made, first distal tapering tang and first clip point. Lots of learning on this one. It is made from 80CrV2 with a stabilized buckeye burl handle.
    1 point
  27. ^ Rob, they make some good points... But your response makes an even better one I think. The best way to get better- is two fold: 1. The ability to recognize, learn from, and improve on mistakes & the methods that made them is the only way to get out of a rut of just repeating them. You must keep trying to do all of the above! IE- keep f-king up. Lol... 2. The importance of understanding honest criticism from peers or seniors- and applying it without anger or attitude... is key to that improvement. As a sixth knife- it's still good
    1 point
  28. Some hacksawing and grinding later and I have the basic form of the pommel. I really should get off my ass and invest in the rest of tools needed to cast non ferrous metals With the overweight pommel and guard mounted the knife doesn't feel awkward but definitely heavy and this is always going to be a strong mans chopper
    1 point
  29. It started with the cutting of the tang. Im not sure what I was thinking when I did that. Spent a ton of time trying to get to force the handle to fit the tang. Also had a few grinding issues. Lot's of good feedback! Thanks! I learn more the fkups than what goes right. I also believe the first pin is too far forward.
    1 point
  30. Are the blade tongs still available? 2021 Price?
    1 point
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