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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/01/2021 in all areas

  1. Bladesmithing is temporarily paused while I work to afford it. So Into the realm of woodworking I go! first 2 of 5 cutting boards are almost done. all they need are juice grooves and finish sanding. Plenty more are on the way
    3 points
  2. Just got these finished up. Clay hardened 1095 with filework and mustard etch, and a baked oil finish. Carved bog oak handles, with antler bolsters and pommels. Bog oak sheaths with leather throats, and copper clips for antler handled ferro rod fire steels. Commercial boxes with fitted foam lining. Went a little more rustic than usual, but I think I like them... Let me know what you think...
    2 points
  3. Did a public demo for the Cades Cove Preservation Association this Saturday. http://www.cadescovepreservation.com/ Negatives: MAN! It was hot! Setting up and especially loading up at day's end had me soaking wet. Light crowd. The folks that run the museum are great, but I think they struggle with publicity. Worked my tail off to have plenty of flint&steel sets and heart pendants on display. Sold one flint&steel. Positives: Sold one knife. Antler crown with poured pewter. Made me sad though that I didn't get
    2 points
  4. I don't see a mess anywhere. At least compared to what I'm used to working in!
    2 points
  5. My computer was having trouble accessing the site for the last month or so, but the Admins go me sorted. Thanks, guys. I was using Bitdefender as an AV and it turned out to be the problem. I'm back now, did you miss me? Geoff
    1 point
  6. Tried a little experiment today. Forged out a santuko for the wife out of N690. Rather pleased with the results. And before you ask - yes, N690 can be forged if you are careful.
    1 point
  7. Depends on the case hardening. A case hardened surface also is a gradient of carbon content. More at the very surface then tapers off until you reach the base metal composition.
    1 point
  8. I eventually moved from a permanently mounted thermocouple like you have to a real long probe that I stick in through the front door when I want to make a measurement. The advantage is two-fold: First, the thermocouples don't last very long in the forge so only having them in their when actually necessary extends the life quite a bit. Second, you will know the temperature of the tip of the thermocouple quite accurately, but that doesn't mean you will know the temperature of what you are working on. I've gotten in the habit of placing the tip of the thermocouple against but in t
    1 point
  9. Note also that just because they're good now doesn't mean the same brand will always be good steel. But you knew that. BTW the Hecho en Mexico Nicholsons are still 1095, they just weren't told how to properly heat treat them. Or how to index the cutting machines so the edge cuts line up with the face cuts, or how to index so that on a safe-edge file the face cut goes to the edge and doesn't stop a sixteenth away... I have some old Bellota rasps that are probably W2, and some new Bellotas that seem case hardened. Same thing happened with Sav-Edge. If the farrier is gonna scrap '
    1 point
  10. You only need an inch or so... Thanks, but nothing to worry about. Easy come, easy go... And the older one gets, the more one should get used to medical stuff getting in the way of plans.
    1 point
  11. Billy he says he has pile of them at his house. That is why I was trying to find out if the steel is any good so I could make him an offer on them. I know nothing about the Bassoli brand. So many of this stuff, files and rasps have gone to crap! Nicholson used to be among the best, if not the best. However since they moved their plant to Mexico there aren't worth bringing home!! Like everything else case hardened a few strokes and their gone and the steel isn't any good for anything! I was hopping someone knew something about the Bassoli brand! When I found them on the centaur fo
    1 point
  12. Alrighty so i changed a few things around finished the stand put some heavy duty casters rated for 250lb on the stand so i can wheel my forge around when NOT in use. Changed the door from that crappy steel door, that i thought was a cool idea in the beginning but wasnt, to firebrick. Added a support for my piping so its not putting pressure on my burner and forge lining. Added hole for thermocouple for when i want to use it. All in all im fairly impressed with myself. what does everyone think? How did i do? anvil is ordered waiting on it to get here then its off to the race
    1 point
  13. so now it needed a handle and a well grained piece of recycled Rimu was cut as a starting point Got some shaping lines drawn on for a 23 inch OAL to allow for a bit more swing and impact than the short hatchet handles will give. Cut out and started the hafting process Finished the shaping and wedged the head and added some B L O sharpened it and had something that can sit in the truck as part of the few tools and bits and pieces I like to keep in case some help is needed on the road for me or someone else in a spot of strife.
    1 point
  14. put the finishing tutches on this bad boy before sharpening it up
    1 point
  15. A stupid mistake on the grinder came back to haunt me, forcing me to redo the ricasso a bit. In the end I think I like it better now, may have to rethink the handle some more now. Also managed to get one side drawfiled and sanded up to 320 in preparation for heat treat. Had to take a break before starting the other side. Fat guys and hot weather don't get along too well!
    1 point
  16. The light rescue set is done with the 11/64 / 4.3mm 1075 nipple nosed knife with is 3 inch straight section blade (9 1/4 in OAL) for those situations where a point is not desired (seat belt or tight tie etc) The bare handle without scales is for compact carry while the radiused edges still give a good hold for comfortable use. The flat head lever made from 1/4" / 6.3mm 5160 has the screwdriver tip on the 3 7/8 blade (8 inch OAL) that also doubles as a stout lever for the situations where this may be necessary. The gutted parra cord wrap gives enough bulk and very good grip for serious use of
    1 point
  17. After the blade was boiled I waxed it and it really improved the finish. I began the handle idea I wanted. First forming a block into the shape which fit the blade, I shaped the handle to the final dimensions I needed. I then made the NS guard and pommel, which I left lightly sanded. I used what I call “redneck urushi” applied to the handle which also allowed a little museum finish at the edges, set the blade with west systems 24 hour epoxy. These are the final photos and I am pleased with the final product. I expect over time the handle will abrade some but I have handled this
    1 point
  18. My hopes where that in all the hammering I kept the layers uniform as possible. I decided to add drill holes on each side to add more topography after etching. The grinding process and continued etchings would meet together and offer more waviness. (Almost!) The layers stayed fairly even, there was some drift and I had to keep the blade symmetrical. What I didn’t like was the after etch color of the mild steel and I took the finish up to 800 grit before the first real etch. I repeated this sanding/etching over 12 times until I got a color with topographical highlight I wanted. I do
    1 point
  19. When I’ve gone as far as I can in shaping by hammer, grinder comes next. I’ll use a plain bench grinder, to rough in the shoulders, blade shape and grind through the scale enough to begin some bevel. (Unfortunately, I missed these photos but I’ll substitute a few from the 1/2” cubed Knives)
    1 point
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