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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/20/2021 in all areas

  1. Forging a copper rose pommel for a misericorde I'm working on. Also going to try and make a couple of tiny ones for the ends of the quillions...
    4 points
  2. Pro tip: If you cook your brussel sprouts in coconut oil it makes it easier to slide them off of your plate and into the garbage. Really nice looking knife, Austin. I like the curve of the base of the blade near the bolster. Also, the sweeping curve of the butt of the grip is elegant. Well done.
    3 points
  3. Got most of the tooling on the leather done today. Hope to finish the chape tomorrow and see if I can add some tooling details on the leather visible through its windows before dyeing. Been trying to visualize how I could do brass straps in between the risers but that is still a future me problem
    2 points
  4. Good looking W's. As Brian pointed out (and I'm sure you already know this) the end grain is the interesting bit, so the question is how will you get those W's on the surface of the blade and not just a tiny little mosaic at the end of the tang? If you don't want to to the mosaic route, twisting is a good choice. Twist up two bars of this in opposite directions and use them as the center bars for a sword or dagger. It'll produce a nice explosion pattern like this (if you grind into it)
    2 points
  5. Socket ax with a bird, Ordos plateau, 4th century BC. Length of the ax 13 cm, the width of the blade 5 cm, weight 290 grams. Total length 54 cm. Oak wood greased with wild boar. Longest dark-handled knife Ingolstadt,Germany around 1100-900 B.C Bronze + beech wood stained with vegetable decoction and greased with boar tallow, length 27 cm, blades 15 cm, total weight 120 grams. Long bri
    1 point
  6. IMO, adding W's to almost any pattern 'turns it up a notch' so-to-speak. Here's a blade I did that was a bit of extra from 1/4 of an explosion billet. Basically it's a billet of crushed W's that I squared up on the diagonal and then forged the blade.
    1 point
  7. You can find a lot of different ways around things, takes some out of the norm thinking. I've also seen 1in square tubing that was collapsed on the flats for hardy shanks which is a little better than an angle iron because you can get a little more weld surface on it. Fabricated hot cut hardies, they do work but are not as durable. It's very tempting to make one out of a leaf spring by welding it to a piece of plate. Depending on your welder, your welding skill, and the plate steel your welding to, probably not the best idea. I have seen it done and used them, but the plate their usually we
    1 point
  8. Somebody did mention dust and the possibility of it burning. Yes, metal can burn. They are known as class D fires and are very difficult to extinguish. In the very unlikely event of you accidentally creating thermite there is no chance of extinguishing that fire, just get yourself to safety. Where I work we have aluminium dust and it has ignited and I dumped a CO2 extinguisher on it and it only burnt hotter. I knew putting water on it would cause an explosion, but the CO2 making it worse was a surprise. We now have a Class D extinguisher that works by surrounding the burning material with a so
    1 point
  9. Wow! That's insanely Beautiful!
    1 point
  10. 1 point
  11. Final dry fit before I finish the blade and glue it up. I was running out of light so the picture is even worse than normal. I had thought about sculpting the handle a bit, but I think I'm going to leave it clean and simple. If I screw it up, I wouldn't have enough time to finish before the deadline.
    1 point
  12. After a little more forging and tweaking, I was satisfied with the shape and straightness. So I clamp my template to the form, and scribe the profile. After grinding the profile, I can strike the edge center lines. I also stike a center line down each face. Now comes the make or break it test. Grinding into this bar will reveal any flaws or voids in the welds. Nothing but clean steel is a good sign.
    1 point
  13. Yes, it is. Just be careful to keep it off the outer surface, unless you want to finish the whole thing with a thin coat.
    1 point
  14. This is the traditional way to do it. For tools like cutoff hardies and such that rely on a larger section above the anvil, you either start with larger stock and forge a shank that fits the hole, upset a bulb in the middle of a bar that fits and forge it into the hole, or weld a collar on a bar that fits. For your bending jig, try 1" square. If it fits, great! If it doesn't, forge it down until it does. Smithing is all about making the tools to make the objects, and with hardy tools Daniel W. is correct: On older ( and many newer!) anvils, the hole will not be a standard dime
    1 point
  15. Alan got me straightened out, so here are the pics of the "happy camper"!
    1 point
  16. I'm with Brian, that shape was the quintessence of the idea "knife" to me as a kid. My first "real" knife was a Kabar. I'd had some crappy advertising pocketknives, but nothing great. My grandfather owned and ran an old country general store, and we lived out behind. I literally grew up in that store. Being what it was, there was a display case of Camillus knives off to the side when you came in the front door. Mostly pocketknives, but a few skinners and other fixed blades. That display case seemed to me at the time to be seven feet tall and three feet wide, full of knives fr
    1 point
  17. The leather stack handle is something I havent done and neither have I done something with a fuller in the blade so not having a mill to do the fuller I was a bit hesitant but decided to "have a go anyway". The KA Bar is a knife with a number of firsts not only with the handle and fuller but depending on the state where it is go go to there is the question of having the clip point sharpened or not. First thing was to get a picture of the knife copied to full size according the the specs I found on line and make a pattern to cut the blades from. I decided to make two with the potenti
    1 point
  18. Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government.
    1 point
  19. I can understand not wanting to rebuild. Do you have any wool left? If so you could possibly wash it in a thin coat of satanite and use it as a way of reducing the size of your forge chamber when you are doing smaller work. That would help in reducing the size of your chamber but leave your with the ability to have more room if needed. Here is a pic of my burner set-up: This is how I have my choke plate mounted, but I like the magnet idea Geoff had. One big difference I note is that my jet goes a bit farther into the burner tube than yours does. Mine runs great with this set-up. I ha
    1 point
  20. Hey guys, I've been stewing for a while and have decided that since I've finally built a decent grinder, the next tools that I need to acquire are a forge press and a heat treating... thingy... Anyway, heat treating thingies. There are a few options that I've been considering. I'm looking for a set up that is capable of heating at least 42"-48", even (enough) heat distribution, and and decent temperature control. Here are the three options I've been considering. Extra long, multiple burner gas forge. This would probably be a horizontal muffle forge type of set up for the most even heat, b
    1 point
  21. this. add a extra third of another 55 gallon drum for more length. get a roll of wool from high temp tools, and a T rex burner and you will be in business for under $500.
    1 point
  22. Used a similar vertical 55 gal heat treating gas fired unit with Sam Salvati in a recent sword making class. He also used 1" of blanket insulation supported by a clever arrangement of nichrome wire. Burner was int he bottom port and the top vent doubled for the entry/exit port. With a manually trimmed NA style propane burner and a type K pyrometer setup stolen from the ceramics studio, it worked very well. We normalized, hardened and tempered around a dozen swords in it quite successfully, in large part thanks to Sam's experience.
    1 point
  23. Thanks Jesus, I have purchased from this company http://www.auberins.com/?main_page=index&cPath=1 and noticed in their list of items , they sell controllers for charcoal smokers . I have an unlimited supply of charcoal fines....maybe my furnace should be in the shape of an old fashioned key hole , with a perforated pipe in the bottom slot. Jan
    1 point
  24. This thread kicks ass. I have been going back and forth about what kind of large heat treating setup I wanted, and now I know, and lo and behold, it's cheap! Thanks for starting it Colin. Also, check this thread out. Its a WIP for the very thing we are talking about.
    1 point
  25. I just built a vertical water-heater-tank sword HT forge. 1 layer of 1" wool with satanite, and a smallish blown burner coming in at a tangent at the bottom. If I tune the burner nice and low, and let it preheat for a while, the temp seems pretty even inside. Maybe a 20 degree variation? Much better than pumping swords through a vertical welding forge, like I'd been doing. I've only quenched one 32" blade out of it yet, though. It took me about $50 worth of wool, about 10 lbs. of satanite, and some scrap metal and a burner that I had lying around. Half a day to build, and works well.
    1 point
  26. No worries Collin. I agree normalizing, annealing and quenching from the forge is time consuming. Best of luck
    1 point
  27. I hope this isn't perceived as arrogance, but I started when I was 10, and I've read so much about heat treating that if you cut me open, I'd probably bleed info about martensite formation. I've been heat treating everything in my coal forge for years. I've successfully heat treated blades up to 27", as well as a pattern welded short sword. Both passed all of my bend tests and edge retention tests. the sword blade actually bent pretty close to 90 degrees and sprung back straight, I didn't have the guts to go much farther. Anyway, thanks for the reply, hope I don't sound too arrogant. I'm jus
    1 point
  28. Prior to purchasing an electric kiln recently, I used a horizontal single burner forge with heavy fire-brick walls. Forge something while it's heating up, don't want to "waste" the gas... but once the bricks are glowing in the right range, I cut the gas and air flow drastically and use the radiant heat from the walls to bring the blade up to temp. Would be harder to judge the longer the forge needs to be, so may not be as precise as some of the other suggestions... Let us know what you settle upon, James Edit to add: A baffle tube inside your heat source will help with heat distribution
    1 point
  29. Jesus, "Single burner large volume (water tank, oil drum) furnace. It works. It's inexpensive to build and operate." Is the exhaust at the top, the sides, or the bottom and is the exhaust distributed over multiple ports. A concern would be getting a drum volume full of explosive gas mixture and going poof....have you planned for that possibility with a pop off area . ? Jan
    1 point
  30. Single burner large volume (water tank, oil drum) furnace. It works. It's inexpensive to build and operate.
    1 point
  31. I'd consider Tyler's mention of using baffles if you don't get an even heat. I built a similar forge and it was NOT an even heat.. at least for something as long as a sword. It's hard to fight the physical law of 'heat rises'. Just make sure you make several ports for a thermocouple so you can see what's going on....
    1 point
  32. Guys, sorry to get back to you late - the site didn't notify me there were more replies. Stewart, I know of guys who have used 100# bottles but I have no personal experience. I've heard they work fine. Brian, I haven't dropped a blade yet but the burner port is big enough to give pretty good access to get a dropped blade out. I temper big blades in my propane grill - I have a big Weber with a thermometer and good temp control. It'll run steady at up to 600F in hot weather, 525 in cold weather.
    1 point
  33. George, it's about a days work and ~$100-$150 in materials. Not a big deal.
    1 point
  34. Very cool, I love the simplicity of it... I need one of those!
    1 point
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