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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/13/2021 in all areas

  1. One side of the sheath is carved Ruggero
    4 points
  2. Nope, you have it right. Tamahagane is a slippery term. The high carbon portion of the raw bloom is the correct usage, because at that stage it looks like jewels, thus the usual translation of "jewel metal." It's not a cast product and so never enters the "pig iron" stage, and yes, the lower carbon iron is not called tamahagane. To break it down, tama = Round, ball, jewel-like, ha = cutting edge, gane = metal. hagane = cutting edge metal = steel. For ease of use, it's normal to refer to traditionally produced Japanese bloomery steel as tamahagane. The difference
    3 points
  3. Yes. Don't get me wrong, they used every bit of the bloom, but the low carbon we'd call wrought tends to end up in the core of kobuse (hot dog in a bun) blades if it's used for blades at all. Most of it went into general-use iron for non-tool objects. The cast was kept and recast into things like teapots. Western bloomery furnaces like the Catalan type were more efficient at making wrought iron (though you can make steel in one if you're careful), and the ore they had access to was far easier to smelt than the iron sand the Japanese were stuck with. Titaniferous* magnetite is s
    2 points
  4. I feel I should note that I understand steel metallurgy fairly well (better than most, but there are still many better than I), but I do not have a strong interest in wootz, and thus don't know all there is to know about it. I have looked into it on a pretty technical level before, but after discovering that it isn't a great material (by modern standards), I deemed it as too much effort to be worth pursuing. Likewise I do not absolutely adore tamahagane/blister steel either. I have a lot of experience melting steel with modern means (induction and arc furnaces), but none with cupula or hear
    2 points
  5. But Jerrod is. Seriously. Pay careful attention to any advice or comment he might offer.
    2 points
  6. Back at it again. I did two runs of 900g this afternoon. One at 6.2V and one at 5.4V (those numbers are mostly for me). I got excellent carbon content but poor consolidation. Running the furnace quite energetically as I’ve found that higher temperatures have given me better steel. These are all the pieces I pulled out hot. The biggest one is almost but not quite all of the first run while the second split between the second two. Everything but one or two pieces sparks like crazy, I’m pretty excited to start working this stuff! These are the strag
    2 points
  7. Just for the record, Larrin over at knifesteelnerds.com has done some testing that shows the lower carbon Sandvik and Uddeholm-Bohler steels like AEB-L and 14C28N do see a slight increase in hardness and toughness after an hour in a standard household freezer versus as-quenched. Not nearly as much as the factory-recommended -100F soak, but better than nothing. Other alloys like CPM154 really need the liquid nitrogen treatment to get decent toughness. AEB-L and 14C28N are both around 0.65% C and 13% Cr, which is their way of keeping the carbide size low. Don't supply enough carb
    2 points
  8. I finally have some time for knife making and one of the things I've been working on is making more hearth steel. I want to get enough for a tanto, which has been somewhat of a challenge because of a persistent problem with carbon distribution in the initial pucks, more on that later. On the suggestion of J. Arthur Loose, I got a used HVAC blower (an Amatek Windjammer) to replace the shop vac I was using. Definitely a fan (), it's quiet and powerful and the setup wasn't too bad. With a DIY three prong plug and a 0-10V DC power supply it was ready to go and offers very precise
    1 point
  9. Here goes nothing--let's see if I can make a sword from dirt. [Jan 2021] The Plan I'm aiming to reproduce a sword that you might encounter in late 6th- or early 7th-century lowland Britain (ie, an "Anglo-Saxon" community). I want to make something typical of archaeological finds from the period, an "average" sword rather than a reproduction of one specific find. I'm going to make it from ore, with maybe a bit of nineteenth-century wrought iron mixed in for fun and contrast. Sources The best survey of swords fro
    1 point
  10. They were the best, for certain very specific uses, prior to 1760. Wootz in particular has some interesting properties, but it is not inherently superior to any modern homogeneous blade steel. Read that thread Jerrod linked, it will reveal much. Jerrod is, by the way, a professional metallurgist. Tamahagane is just steel. Nothing special about it, it's just cleaner than most bloomery-derived steels of the same time period due to the extensive processing of the bloom. It does show a pretty microstructure when polished properly, but it's basically fancy axle shaft steel. It can'
    1 point
  11. EDC is dependent on your daily life. The needs of a cowboy and the needs of a warehouse worker are going to be different. A while back I forged a blade for myself for use around the shop and yard. By the time I got done, I had a stout box knife. I did a survival course back in the 80's. We were allowed one knife, I chose the Swiss Army Knife, which at the time was my EDC, and it easily did all that I needed.
    1 point
  12. This is what I have carried for the last 10 years or so, blade is about 3.5" This one I traded for a custom hat More like 5 inch blade Blacksmith rat tail edc 3 inch blades
    1 point
  13. 4mm is pretty thin for a dirk (the etymology probably comes from 'durke' meaning stout or thick in Old Scots), so I would go full convex to zero.
    1 point
  14. I haven’t had a ton of knife making time lately, especially for projects other than custom orders, but I managed to squeeze this one in. A 6” santoku made from White #2 and 1018, the handle is nickel silver and basswood to emulate the handle construction commonly found on vintage Japanese kitchen knives. The grind is slightly asymmetric and it has a roughly 70/30 edge which I’m interested to try out. Pre heat treat and coated with a slurry prior to water hardening along with a 300mm yanagiba you may be seeing more of. Being ab
    1 point
  15. When going with any of the cold treatments, it seems to me that control isn't nearly as important as getting cold enough. Your freezer isn't likely to do too much. Those are typically around 0F to -15F. Ideally you want to be more like -100F or colder. Dry ice is generally the starting point for these things. "Cold" treatments are often considered at least -150F (colder than dry ice), and "cryo" at least -310F. That being said, I know there are alloys out there that do tend to respond to dry ice levels. Often people will say either "cold" or "cryo" when referring to either process, more
    1 point
  16. Note that the manufacturer of the steel says that you will not get optimal results when re-hardening. "Rehardening is generally not recommended as it will not give optimal product properties." -Sandvik I would not even dream about heat treating stainless steels without having a thermocouple controlled heat source (forge or oven). These things get quite finicky. There are a few different things that are happening with the tricky heat treats. One reason for the "lower" temperature soaks, sometimes there will be more than one recommended, is to make sure all
    1 point
  17. Thanks everyone! I have tons of these in the works, so I hope to post more of that here. A quick look at a new nakiri in the works:
    1 point
  18. Thanks Joshua, and it’s not gold lip (just a trick of the light) it’s normal white mother of Pearl
    1 point
  19. Hi all, the seax is ready. Now i beginn withe the sheath carving. Ruggero
    1 point
  20. @Joshua States sorry for the late reply on this, if you’re still interested it is one of the 116630 line. I don’t know how much the specific capacity matters, I’ve so far never used it much over 50% of the max control voltage. The output also happens to be an excellent fit in the ID if 3/4” pipe, forming an adequate seal with no fittings or tape. In other news, I seem to have overcome the “two tone” carbon content problem I’ve had. Adding more angle of depression and upping the blower speed meant the bottom of the furnace was hotter. So I can remember, I used a control voltage o
    1 point
  21. So my aim was to knock out a simple(ish) seax and sheath that looked aged and legitimate to try and sell. I’ll be honest and say I made the sheath twice. After a few too many beers and a late night in the shop I decided that applying heat to the copper bits so I’d get a better blackened effect from liver of sulfur was a keen idea. If your sheath is assent please don’t. It shrank, cracked, and literally split over the blade. It was within two seconds. Anyway.. rant concluded So 1095, mahogany, and a smidge of water buffalo horn. Some veg tan and copper and here it is. Let
    1 point
  22. Twisting, twisting, twisting... The bar on top isn't twisted tight enough yet--I took this photo between heats, then kept twisting tighter. The 1/4" bars are so easy to snap while I'm twisting them! I may have had to scarf weld a few back together. I've twisted 3 of the 4 bars. I'm hoping to do the last after work tonight--more updates coming!
    1 point
  23. The core bars [Feb 2021] For the twisted core bars, I used more hearth steel (carburized bloom) + some nineteenth-century wrought iron that has a moderate phosphorus content. The last time I used this combination I got a great color contrast, so: fingers crossed? 1.5lb (700g) of hearth refined bloom steel + about as much phosphoric iron, ready to weld: Heating it up... Success! And drawing it out into a 1/4" (6mm) square bar: This netted me enough for 2 bars.
    1 point
  24. No pressure, but I'm pinning this one.
    1 point
  25. Making Hearth Steel [Feb 6, 2021] For the blades of the sword, I wanted high-carbon steel. I decided I'd make that by melting my scrap into a charcoal hearth. I recorded a video of the process: 2lb (.9kg) of scrap, plus a copious serving of high-iron bloomery slag, gave me nearly 2lb of high carbon steel. Hopefully that'll be enough for my blade edges!
    1 point
  26. Things get crazy in these alloys. Little bit of copper in Al? No problem. Little bit of Al in Cu? *CRAZINESS!*
    0 points
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