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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/16/2021 in all areas

  1. Final got to start fabricating my new belt grinder this evening, I cut a flange plate on the laser cutter at work this afternoon. ( Sooooo glad managers have meetings every day ). Welded the flange to a 4 inch wide section of pipe, will take it back to work tomorrow and tru it up in a lathe, I didn't realise until I put the parts together this evening how out of tru the pipe section is . Apologies for the state of the workshop, we were hit by a small tornado ( yup !!!!, we got a tornado in the UK!!) and I've been fixing fences etc and haven't quite got round to tidying up.
    2 points
  2. These have all been out in the world. These are all filled with G-Flex Geoff
    2 points
  3. Hey All, I'm Barney Barnett, 41 yrs old. I have 3 kids 2 boys 12 and 4 and a girl who is 3. Glad to be here in this forum. Been reading a lot. I built my first little brick coal forge a couple years ago. Just got a new propane 2 blower forge a couple months ago when I moved. Love it. Made a few knives. Working on some now that I am done moving. Going to try my first damascus one here soon, wish me luck. I just love forging and making knives. Got my 12 year old into it. Got him a smaller anvil so we work on stuff together now. He's working on a railroad spike knife now for hi
    2 points
  4. Here's one from a "Top 6" review list I found. Hollow grinds and convex "edge". Just to show I'm not completely idiot
    1 point
  5. Well, if you want 10 different answers, ask 5 different experts Truth be told, there are a lot of regional variations in the shells of oysters. It's not surprising so many shucking approaches have developed. Just make sure to include a gut hook in your oyster knife design If you are not already aware of the Good Eats oyster episode, check out season 8 episode 2. (At least that's when it showed in the US)
    1 point
  6. That is lovely indeed! It isn't fine enough to be 18th century work, though, in my opinion. Looks like late 19th century to me, but certainly in the style of the late 17th century French work. But I'm no expert on architectural iron, not by any means!
    1 point
  7. Standard 55-gallon/204-liter steel drums. You may have to add another one cut in half to get the height you need for some swords, but the diameter is the critical thing for even heat with a single burner. You can use a much smaller tank, like a large water heater, for a two-burner setup.
    1 point
  8. I don't believe any gas burner heat treat forge will work well in a vertical configuration without making it overcomplicated. I too am short on space so I tried to use a drum forge vertically, but even with baffles and a lot of tinkering it never really worked well. Once I turned it horizontal it worked without any issues, I have to store it outside under a tarp, because it takes up so much space, but in my mind this is worth it for how effective it is.
    1 point
  9. In my Kitchen knife thread you told me "practice makes perfect" and that is as true here as it was there. I always do a practice piece before I set to the actual knife parts. It gets me back in the "groove" so to speak. On clamshell filework, I start with a triangle file to mark the lines and start the grooves. Then I can nestle a small round file in there and gradually open them up with larger rounds. Practice on pieces of scrap.
    1 point
  10. I've boiled antler before but not for the fitting up to a tang. It was a three part antler handle with two more bronze spacers, and I boiled it in a mixture of instant coffee to patina it. The process did very little if nothing structural, and a small bedding of epoxy soaked into the pith was used for the final fitting. That was maybe seven years ago and the handle is still just as solid as it was then.
    1 point
  11. The motor was definitely wired for high voltage. I switched it, but now instead of tripping the thermal protection switch, its blowing the circuit breaker instead. The amp meter shows it drawing 30+ amps instead of the 15 it shows on the data plate. The redneck in me wants to just put a bigger breaker in my panel, but the firefighter in me thinks that's probably not the right solution.
    1 point
  12. I have been a lurker for a while, but I wanted to share what I was working on and look for some advice. I was working on a chefs knife for my wife, the first picture is the original profile. during grinding I overheated the edge, so I ground away some of the belly to get back to hard steel. Then during hand sanding, I noticed that I still had soft sections in the heal of the blade, so I re-hardened and had to grind away even more of the blade. Now I am thinking I just need to re-forge a new blade. I didn't include any pictures of the blade after I re-heat treated, but I lost about another
    1 point
  13. The boil thing only works on fresh antler. I drill and epoxy, and usually pin as well. I like antler.
    1 point
  14. 1 point
  15. It's usually a very fine powder. It's what they fortify your Wheaties with. I can see using it in a crucible if you want to make a custom alloy (and you have the appropriate other elements), and the thermite boys like it for the same reason, but since I don't do either of those things it doesn't appeal to me personally. But there may be some interest.
    1 point
  16. The cart really isn't as bad as it looks: it doesn't wiggle while pressing and there only a tiny bit of movement while rolling it around, so I haven't bothered reinforcing it. And yep. I made my own width-drawing die out of a 2-1/2 inch 1045 round I decided I didn't want to make a hammer with after all, so that's not a problem anymore. I've made five different sets of my own dies now (seven if you count two that didn't last). I tried A36/1018, but the dies on the 12-ton are so small they get destroyed almost immediately, so I've been using hardenable stuff at least as a surface pl
    1 point
  17. That one is a commission sale and the client picked the blade shape from my online portfolio, and the handle material she also picked out of sample photos I sent. That one and the one on the far left are light knives, weighing under 6 oz. Balance point of that one is a little bit froward on the horn bolster.
    1 point
  18. I have now used my new forge enough to be able to calculate, we have tanks which are 33 kg or in your units round 72 pounds. That actually was enough for two solid days of welding or in my calculations of 15 hours where I didnt attempted to spare fuel. I have put a choke into the gas line, drilled 2,5 mm. My thinking = original double T rex forge had injectors from 1 mm mig tips. 2 holes 1 mm diameter are about 6X less than one 2,5 mm. When I was welding I was cranking them 1,5 bar or almost 2 bars. Now I register about 0,4-0,5 bar on my ventil against that choke, that is 6Xless through
    1 point
  19. Looking good! I only like making kitchen knives when I can make them utilitarian and brut de forge, fancier kitchen knives don't do much for me. However I do end up making kitchen knives on request, people do want them. I actually said no to a possible damascus one a while back, my wrists really can't handle more damascus billets at this point I sold my power hammer at the wrong time it seems.
    1 point
  20. the J did come out ok.. The M washed out completely.. If I were to do it again I would use a special stamp that had a wider action. But welding the 15n20 and punching it in it sheared and was pushed down the amount of the character height. Not perfect but it can be seen from both sides.
    1 point
  21. Why not go a step further and file the handle to resemble a clamshell?
    1 point
  22. What is your heating setup? Just a forge, or do you have a kiln? And if a forge, gas or solid fuel? How are you judging temperature, in other words? 1075 is one of the easiest steels to heat treat, since it's right at the eutectoid point with reference to the iron/carbon phase diagrams and it has no other carbide-forming elements. This means no soaking needed, as there are no big carbides to break up or distribute. Your only variable is manganese, which ranges from 0.4% on the low side (the maximum recommended for good hamon) to around 0.8% on the high side (deeper hardening).
    1 point
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