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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/01/2022 in all areas

  1. Early medieval battle axe. I used wrought iron (old 19-century wagon axel) and medium carbon steel (1045). I based on the archaeological find from the Płock area (Poland). The eye is wrap and forge-welded, the cutting edge is symmetrical.
    4 points
  2. Finally got to the knife I glued up Christmas eve. Done with grinder work on to hand sanding today and probably some void filling since it is Spalted maple.
    3 points
  3. Made a stand for my post vise,plan on adding 2 wheels on the back at a later date
    3 points
  4. Welcome to the world of hot working tool steel. It's easy to understand why, in the old days, the apprentice's first year or so was spent entirely on managing the fire. I'm sure that the above is partly what was learned above and beyond just to how to manage the coal and the blower.
    2 points
  5. On thing to keep in mind when using molten lead is the fumes. When I was working for a clinic that did heavy metal testing on people we had at least a couple of welders who refused to wear respirators come in with high lead levels and had to be laid off from their jobs. Doug
    2 points
  6. Well, since there's a thread for them, I'll jump in. This is from yesterday, after forging a couple crosses for my parents.
    1 point
  7. Hi everyone! Hope you've all survived the Holiday feasting without too much abdominal pain! (and yet we have New-Year eve right around the corner! ) Anyhow, I've been working on this Seax inspired blade... It is not exactly historically correct - but I weighed my need for self expression higher than historically accuracy in this project. Below is a preview of the blade itself. Currently I am working on the handle - more specifically the rear bolster. Engraving is a time consuming process I'm afraid... The blade length from where the tang meets t
    1 point
  8. I might do an informal version someday, but the full blown scholarly research version with citations and illustrations will have to wait until someone pays me to do it.
    1 point
  9. It's comforting to know that I am in good company. Letting it get to the right temp is the one of the hardest parts for me. I either get impatient and pull it out to soon or go work on something else to keep me occupied and come back to half melted steel. Closing the welds in the first heat is also something I haven't fully accomplished yet. Invariably one corner doesn't get smacked right and then I end up fighting it the rest of the time. I do scrub the scale off as best I can on the welding sufaces, throughout the forging process. At least when I remember. I won't lie, most of th
    1 point
  10. That is one gorgeous piece of wood. Brilliant! You've just given me ideas when it comes to my next dagger build.
    1 point
  11. I brought a laser into the smithy and noticed no time warp. It should help me create symmetry around a centerline and locate the pivot hole.
    1 point
  12. Lead is also useful in Martempering (if one wants to go down that rabbit hole).
    1 point
  13. I found the 1/4” augerbit with screw tip starter works great, then I use a homemade broach, (patience providing.) I bought other long drill bits, in 1/8” but found they skewed depending on the wood grain. There is a way to deliberately skew a drill bit in order to fit a curved handle but I haven’t conquered this technique and I don’t have material to waste trying it.
    1 point
  14. I typically drill a 1/4" hole, in the center of where I want the slot with a 1/4" auger bit. Then I use some miniature rasps to create a narrow slot, leaving the circle in the center. The long auger bit comes in very handy for a through tang design, and the miniature wood rasps get used for all sorts of handle shaping.
    1 point
  15. My mother commissioned me to make this one as a gift for her grandson (my nephew). He likes to fish and hunt, and my sister actually picked out a pattern from one I'd made years ago. It has contemporary elements like the ricasso and and etched logo, but I had to incorporate the seven pin bird-head handle to keep a little 18th century vibe going. I forged the blade from 1084. The handles are, as Dr. Jim would say, bovine ivory (cow bone). The pins are 6p finish nails. Leather sheath dyed with iron acetate and hardened with heat and bee's wax. 4.25" blade, 8" overall.
    1 point
  16. A dual gas torch, such as oxygen acetylene is used to keep the heat local at the spine with the workpiece secured in a vise and/or backed up on the edge side. Hammer blows will only move the part that is hot.
    1 point
  17. Upsetting the spine and then scraping is what I have heard. Very light hammer to keep the upset local. Those blades are incredibly complex, well beyond my skills to do properly. That doesn't mean much, though.
    1 point
  18. I too am delighted you showed up, Jake! All I can add is with atmospheric (venturi) burners, aim for neutral to get the most possible heat with the least damage. Every burner is different, and it's up to the user to figure it out. I too feel bad trying to do remote diagnostics, but you're right, the scale looks good. With a blown burner it's easier, and with solid fuel it's even more so, but I too have issues waiting for that first heat to mature. I do axes in coal, and I have figured out how to watch the flame for cues it's ready (flame turns green, occasional spark, etc.), but with
    1 point
  19. P.S. Faye,i'm NOT saying that there's necessarily anything wrong with your T or Atm. The scale on your forgings,and around the anvil stump looks fine,visually,thin and not excessive... But speaking for myself i know by now i have a real problem with patience in regards to waiting for stuff to come to heat,where the big heavy forging is involved. Especially that first heat,the most important one,is difficult to wait out for some reason...
    1 point
  20. Joshua hi,Happy Solstice-Merry Christmas-Happy New Year to you,Sir,and everyone here! Yes,i piped up tentative-like. Cautiously,because you guys are doing a great job trying to help Faye here,and also 'cos i'm away from my forge at present,and it feels weird dispensing advice whilst not actually forging oneself... But since i have,again i'd like to point to Heating specifically.Unfortunately we all do it differently,and i presume Faye's using propane? It's been years since i forged with propane,so am sadly under-informed on specifics of that...Would ju
    1 point
  21. Sunday I gave myself a couple Christmas presents. I've been wanting to get organized this really helped. A tool cart and small tool box just for knife making drill bits and milling bits.
    1 point
  22. Got a little bit done on this today. Ground the fullers in, scraped them and got them sanded to 400 for minimal post quench clean up. Filed the spine and eyeballed the flats for the habaki. So now I think I just need to finish some sanding an drilling a hole in the tang and it's about ready for heat treating
    1 point
  23. Faye,i feel your frustration,and am only too familiar with everything you're going through. On the bright side,you're doing Really good at practicing all the necessary moves that are involved in building an axe-head,welding seems to be the main challenge,but all these other things-forging that complex 3-D shape-are also most crucially important,and you're getting better very rapidly. I really like that last pre-form,great job on that. We all know just how tough it is to help someone with a welding situation remotely...You're getting some wonderful feedback though,n
    1 point
  24. The industrial controllers generally allow the operator to adjust the setpoint in "vanilla" PID control (no ramp/soak), but anything beyond that often requires a God-level passcode that allows access to absolutely everything. I have had a knifemaker, with an oven I'd built, call me because he'd hit a wrong button whilst working through a menu and changed the thermocouple type from N to R or S. He was smart enough to recognize that he was getting temperatures in the tempering range when set for the Austenitizing range and called me. I'd made a similar mistake in the past, so quickl
    1 point
  25. I don't know how familiar you are with PID temperature control generally. I set up PID controllers in my day job: I'm certainly no expert, but I'm not completely clueless. There were a couple of things I didn't fully understand about the process when I built my first HT oven. With the benefit of hindsight, I would have appreciated being told. Pottery kilns tend to provide "Heat-Work" and the important parameter is the average temperature maintained over several hours. The workpieces usually have considerable thermal mass which helps damp out temperature fluctuations.
    1 point
  26. Been a while since the last but here's a nakiri that now just needs some final polish and sharpening The core is 115crv3 with a cladding in 75ni8 and 80crv2 Decided to try out an heirloom fit on the gidgee handle against the copper washer and think I'll continue making them with the edges slightly rounded instead on the next ones
    1 point
  27. These are some photos, of my first attempt at recreating the essence of the diamond pattern. I say essence because it isn’t an exact replica as the elements don’t exactly replicate the originals. So I suppose a better term would be proof of concept of this pattern type using elements, like my 4 petaled flower, that I had laying around the shop. Four of the photos were of the blade post heat-treat. The last photo is a better look at the pattern after it’s been ground on a bit. I would be curious to hear your thoughts. one last thing I will add, is that this b
    1 point
  28. How to Start... A beginners & newbie info thread The Age old craft this forum is about seems to attract more guys as it used to for some while. Thus in the past months we have seen an increasing number of "How to Start", "Where to begin" questions posted to this board. I believe the great thing about this very community is the will to help each other, to advance and to share. However the "downside" is that if a question will be asked too many times, people could get annoyed by and not answer, vanish, or answer the question "halfhearted". All options which I would not desire. This commu
    1 point
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