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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/18/2022 in all areas

  1. This is my most prized piece to date. I’m just 1 year into physically bladesmithing. I’ve been studying and reading for about 5 years. Minimal tools in my shop, no press or power hammers. A home built 2x72. Critique is welcomed
    4 points
  2. Recently finished this one up for a buddy of mine. Blade is 1/8" thick 1084/15N20 san-mai. Didn't get as much differentiation between the layers as I would have liked , but you can see the transition if you look closely enough. The main handle wood is Walnut that was harvested from an original M1 Garand stock, with African Blackwood and brass fittings. .30-06 shell casing inlaid into the pommel. It's also the first blade that I've ever marked.
    3 points
  3. I'm not particularly sure what to call this seax, but the goal was to make this a seax that would have been accessible to the normal everyday person. I had a lot of fun and learned a lot from this, hopefully many more to come! Forged from 1065, and I did clay it but less for any real reason and more for practice mixing, applying, and working with a clayed blade. Handle is made out of burn-pile rescue Madrone, so it did have some checking in it, but I'm not too worried and it's not big enough to cause any pinching in the hand. I added a bolster of antler fr
    3 points
  4. Forged this last weekend to see if the shop gremlins were still active. Cleaned it up yesterday. Did the HT this morning, and since I unexpectedly had the rest of the day free, went ahead and hafted it. Needs some work on the bevel to blend everything. Mild steel body, file edge with teeth (they'll show up as it ages), curly ash handle. Wood finished natural with boiled linseed oil to bring up the stripes. This is some nice ash, I'll be sad when it's all gone.
    3 points
  5. So over the last few years I have been building the blacksmithing school. The gentleman whom has been helping me is also a forging person, and is into knives so it's been a great time. We have covered flat jaw tongs, and hot hardie. With knife making in mind we setup a time to forge a set of box jaw.. the most difficult type as well.. these are #2 in difficulty because of the small gap between the jaw pivot/boss and the jaw itself.
    2 points
  6. I have been itching to make wrought iron Dividers, Tomahawk or a Puuko. How about a Wrought Iron challenge with high carbon blade edge
    2 points
  7. So my very first hatchet attempt got seriously reprofiled after I ground down to solid welds. It's pretty but not very correct. I'm not sure if its a mutant hybrid, or if there is a technical name for something that looks like a tomahawk and has a hatchet style poll. I used red oak for the handle and used Don Abbott's iron acetate recipe to dye the stripe. The damascus turned out way cool on this one. I was thinking about keeping it, but I put a picture on my facebook page and have a couple people who want to buy it. I have a hard time selling rejects though, so it will probably end up as
    2 points
  8. The important one is done and ready to go! The eye on this one is by far the best out of the five that I made, which is maybe a little sad cause this one is still crooked. I have little doubt that it will preform very well, despite the imperfections. Thank you to everyone who imparted their wisdom, and encouragement. I greatly appreciate your help and patience.
    2 points
  9. Some new Karelian Birch handle blocks arrived from Bogdan Drevetskiy in the Ukraine this morning. I am quite partial to the gold flecks in the blue and green blocks and the red and black will have a variagated finish that will make a nice visual on the handle. I have traded with a taxidermist friend in South Africa for these and he is just waiting on the cites paperwork before getting them away to me. Costly but my customer base loves giraffe bone with the previous lot I got being used in short order . Makes for a very nice handle either on its own or complemented with
    1 point
  10. A very classic looking package. I like the brass in the butt cap.
    1 point
  11. Thanks so much for taking the time to make these videos.
    1 point
  12. 1 point
  13. I'm loving the medium count layer with a twist. It would make a nice steak knife as it is. Doug
    1 point
  14. Looks good to me. While this is true, the question I'd have before making any changes is, what's the intended use for this knife? If it's to cut up steaks, then I wouldn't change a thing.
    1 point
  15. Minor progress, and I'm not sure I like this at all. I finished the forging on the guard. Then I made and fit the 5-piece spacer package. Two twist Damascus plates and three .04" nickel-silver plates.
    1 point
  16. a 1000 year old seax that has survived to this day. Love the checking in the handle to show age and pleased you havent filled it. nice bit of file work and even the sheath shows an age that is belied by your asertion that it is freshly made.
    1 point
  17. I like the way your twist turns toward the tip in the leading 1/4 of the blade. If it was me I would radius the edges of the handle considerably more so the shape is more ovaloid rather than radius edged square. Much easier on the hand for prolonged use.
    1 point
  18. You have a FB page? I thought FB was for old people....... I like that one. It has that look about it that says "frontier life" where everything had multiple uses and was sort of hybrid in form. Get over that. If someone wants it, sell it to them, as long as you feel confident that the HT is good, and it will perform as intended. Offer a return period and call it good. Don't think of it as a reject. Think of it as an experimental axe, which is exactly what it is.
    1 point
  19. In October 2020 I finished up this gate project with an automatic opening system, lights, the whole shebang. It was nerve racking that I couldn't stage anything before setting it in place. I made sure to measure everything thrice and rig up the anchors so they were in the right spot when the footings were poured. The leaves are made from old boiler pipe sections from an old industrial laundry factory that was in Durham, NC. It's been over 2 years since I last posted to the forum, so this is a long overdue update on what I've been up to. A friction fo
    1 point
  20. 1" of wool is fine. You don't want these to be too efficient!
    1 point
  21. I have another idea for the mix. Pocket tools. Those little screwdriver leverage tool bottle opener things. g
    1 point
  22. I purchased a roll of Superwool. It's 1" thick, 24" wide and 25 feet long. Cut to fit inside the bottom, line with chicken wire, and hold it to the tank with self-tapping screws. The pipe in the center is the burner. Today I made to top port (where the blade gets inserted) and a 2x2 vent. Tomorrow, I will try and put the lining on the top half.
    1 point
  23. I like the tools idea. Calipers, dividers, kiradashi, scribes and punches. g
    1 point
  24. I went to look at my copy of that book to see if there was a better picture, but you posted one better than on the book! Like Joel said, it's a French Sabatier. The bolster and keyhole is cast pewter, and it most likely has a full tang. Very common on French cutlery of the 1860-1900 period.
    1 point
  25. My little sister wanted to get the big sis a knife block for Christmas, but couldn't find one in town. She enlisted my equipment operating skills (much to her chagrin) and we put one together ourselves from red oak and black walnut. In this project we discovered neither of us are particularly adept at woodworking. It is fully funtional, not very square or flat, and held together with copious amounts of glue and shear stubborn will power. It was a fun little break from knife orders, though both of us are glad we got it done today.
    1 point
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