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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/20/2022 in all areas

  1. I haven't been very active at the forge for the last year, so I thought I'd give myself a kick in the pants by doing a WIP for my KITH entry this year. I've learned that unzipping the preverbal fly in front of the all-mighty interweb seems to motivate me to do my best work. Having never played with wrought iron before, let alone welding a piece of high carbon steel to it, I thought I'd do a simple wood chisel. Everyone needs a good 1" chisel, right? I started with a piece of 3/4" square wrought That I ordered from a guy up in Canada. I was advised to forge it mostly
    3 points
  2. Here’s my take on a bird and trout knife 1084 and box elder burl. Definitely going to be testing it out on some trout in the next few weeks! Thanks
    2 points
  3. Thanks, the team of surgeons are positive that I'll make a full recovery, ironically I caught my overall sleeve caught while turning off the industrial size belt grinder I was using, a press of a button, a large jolt and a chopper ride later, Already planing and trying to draw left handed in my hospital bed
    2 points
  4. There were two issues that popped up because the inlet was a bit deeper on the top edge on the back of the handle. One was that as the band wrapped and got nailed down, it twisted towards the upper edge. This required a little twisting and an emergency removal of a bit more wood along the top edge of the inlet while the band was in place. This was most annoying, and means there's a tiny gap on the bottom edge in this location. It won't be noticeable when I'm done, but I know it's there. There's also a slight misalignment where the ends butt up, which IS noticeable. But it's too late to fix n
    1 point
  5. Looking at that last picture I can see the inlet wasn't level on the back of the handle, which explains some things... Anyway, once it fits flush with no overlap on the ends, nail one end down. One hole at a time, use a clamp to hold the silver tight to the wood if you can. The following pics show a series of how I fixed a mistake (I'm told that's the best part of my demonstrations, I always screw up and then show how to fix it), but this time the camera malfunctioned and a lost a few important shots. In the first pic, the band is mostly nailed on, but there's a nail missing. I u
    1 point
  6. Anneal the silver and bend it around the handle with the top edge up against the top edge of the inlet. Use the Exacto knife to finalize the location of the bottom edge by making a deep scribed line (it'll have moved a bit!) and chisel out the excess. File the bottom smooth and level. Constantly check the fit. Once it snap in place, see how much overlap there is on the ends. If you measured the band by wrapping a string or something around the handle, there should be 0.050 extra since you've now inlet the silver. Cut or file that off.
    1 point
  7. Today was the wide silver band on the handle. First decide the width and cut the silver, then clean up the edges so it's even, then draw a line around the handle where you want the top edge of the band to be. Use the coping saw or whatever to cut a line 0.025" deep and carve a bevel where the inside of the band will be. Now lay the silver in the bevel with the edge up against the cut line. Use the silver itself as a guide and lightly trace a line around the bottom edge with an Exacto knife. This is to tell you roughly where the lower edge will be. DO NOT cut it out t
    1 point
  8. Not directly smihing related, but some very cool machinery in this.
    1 point
  9. Thank you very much for your earlier advice, it was very helpful in rectifying the noise issue I was having. However, it was then apparent that I had another issue, that being, that my burner option was wholly insufficient. Because I made my coffee can style forge about twice the size of most people's coffee can forges, my burner is to underpowered for it. So I had to purchase an more standard option for my burner. (Shown in picture) Though the question I have about it is, do I have to run it with the larger flared fitting on the end, or can I remove it and run it w
    1 point
  10. Totally forgot to get a shot of the mouthpiece with its four nails prior to filing them off after family stuff this afternoon, sorry. But here it is filed flush... The trick here is to keep the nails short. They are evenly spaced around the widest part of the cone, where there's about 0.25" / 6.5mm of wood between the inlet and the smoke hole. You do not want the nails to protrude very far into the smoke hole. A tiny bit is okay, then you can use a 1/4" rod driven into said hole to clinch the nails over, strengthening the joint. But if they're too long, that pulls t
    1 point
  11. This made my day, Thank You!! The micarta is just a block I picked up from Blade Show West a few years back when they still came to Portland,OR, so I'm not sure what kind it is..The layers are real wavy and look close-knit, so maybe..linen or a tight burlap.? I took a shine to the block because it was cut differently from usual, so each layer was visible on the face side of the block. I agree about the Hamon hiding the lines of the knife, but I have to say I was grateful for it this time because I couldn't get the lines are crisp as I had hoped..
    1 point
  12. Not going to get in the shop for a few months, had an accident @work on Wednesday. mangled my right hand, damage to trigger finger tendon and massive loss of skin and tissue was taken to hospital via Air ambulance, two opps in and a third on Tuesday scheduled chopper piolet took my photo while I was being off loaded
    0 points
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