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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/02/2022 in all areas

  1. This is the saya for the project.
    4 points
  2. Hello all, this is my first post here, so you will have to forgive me if I mess something up in the formatting or story telling. Finished vise: Vice can be rotated 360 degrees and locked into place. It can also tilt to whatever angle you like, including vertically. One side is flush with the jaws so you can work on handles. Flip it around and you can and sand your blades easily. I have been clamping the blade directly to the platform with it tiled downwards at about 30 degrees. I found that having the tip near the bottom and the blade just barely overhanging the edge works best. Side view of the assembled center section. Note the springs that pull the top jaw upwards whenever you loosen the knobs. The top and bottom jaws have threaded holes in them. The bottom jaw is held firmly in place and the top jaw floats up and down. The tab on the bottom is to help keep it from sliding out. It rides against the edge of the support bracket most of the time. Front view looking at the handle sanding end with the jaws opened up. "Exploded" view of the base showing the construction of it. It is attached to my bench with some furniture screws that accept a 1/4-20 bolt, some of which are shown below everything. "Exploded" view of the center barrel with the parts laid out in their rough positions. The top of the support is cut out so you can slide the center barrel in and out to swap sides. I have found this to be super useful. I hope you all like it.
    4 points
  3. There are small and light messers that are perfect to hang at your side in daily life and then there are dedicated battlefield weapons. The idea behind this build was to make a tool more suited for limb removal than flexing on the peasants at the market square. Therefore I ended up spending way more time getting a uniform filed finish on the hilt parts with progressively finer files than if I had just broken out the sandpaper followed it with light buffing and a scuff with scotch brite. The blade shape is a elmslie m3e+ starts out just over 7mm thick at the guard, down to 4mm at the first clip and 2,5 a few centimeters behind the tip, the tip itself swells slightly in thickness to reinforce it. It's overall length is 111cm and the blade is 81cm Cob is 9cm from the guard and the cop is at 53cm And now for the weight.. it's a whopping 1730grams but the strange thing is just how lively and dynamic it feels in the hand, make no mistake this is definitely a two handed weapon but I've made swords half a kilo lighter that felt clumsy in comparison.
    2 points
  4. Nice knife! Thanks for the mention @Aiden CC. The engraving has a really steep learning curve, and the more of a perfectionist you are the harder it is. There are some guys out there that make this stuff look like it was cut by a laser. I am not one of those guys, but I think I can do ok. My process is pretty simple. I draw the design, use some kind of art fixative to keep it on the surface, and then carve it with a really sharp skew chisel ( i just made my tools). You want to carve a “V’ shaped cut from one side then from the other. When you make the second cut you get a curly tail that comes out of the groove. Sometimes it helps to moisten the antler somewhat with a wet paper towel for a few minutes before carving. Then I rub an oil based artist paint in the cengraving. I think the more traditional way to do it was dark wood/bark dust mixed in lard. I’m not very traditional (either in knife designs or engraving designs). Do lots of test pieces before you do the knife! Here’s a photo dump of some of my stuff:
    2 points
  5. A quick update on the first blade: You can see the different amount of steel exposed on the two sides, I think I can even this up a bit (though I wish I could make both sides look like the first photo). It also looks like there is a hamon, visible in the places where lots of steel is exposed. Hopefully some more to come on these in a few days!
    1 point
  6. My first attempt at a sabre grind was TERRIBLE so I had to try it again. My first knife was more of a prison shiv so it won't ever be posted here, or anywhere I am somewhat pleased with how this turned out though. 1084 steel with brass pins and layered G10 for handle material. To get the stripes to show up on the knife I ground the layered G10 down at 1.5 degrees like I was putting a bevel on it. Then I made the other side parallel. The end effect was that the layers are no longer parallel to the knife and it kinda brings some to the surface like you would see after an earthquake pushes up layers of sedimentary rock. After all was said and done, the flats on either side of the handle are flat and parallel to each other. Thanks.
    1 point
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