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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/05/2022 in all areas

  1. 1 point
  2. At the time I wrote that, 'some' meant 'a few'. I hadn't yet read a wonderful little book titled "Knives and Scabbards" by Cowgill, de Neergaard and Griffiths. It's a detailed study of medieval knives, shears and scissors found in garbage dumps near London. It turns out my butt weld technique would be right at home in the 13th century. Most of the blades analyzed were wrought iron with a steeled edge. I took Alan's advice and have been using 1075 on the edge. The picture shows blades of 1018/1075 after they were drawn to half the original thickness. The two alloys moved about the same amount. I'm also more careful to work at high heats. I used to do some straightening at lower heats, but I can see how that created shear along the weld. I now take a heat to straighten as well as to forge.
    1 point
  3. My first attempt at a sabre grind was TERRIBLE so I had to try it again. My first knife was more of a prison shiv so it won't ever be posted here, or anywhere I am somewhat pleased with how this turned out though. 1084 steel with brass pins and layered G10 for handle material. To get the stripes to show up on the knife I ground the layered G10 down at 1.5 degrees like I was putting a bevel on it. Then I made the other side parallel. The end effect was that the layers are no longer parallel to the knife and it kinda brings some to the surface like you would see after an earthquake pushes up layers of sedimentary rock. After all was said and done, the flats on either side of the handle are flat and parallel to each other. Thanks.
    1 point
  4. How long is a piece of string?
    1 point
  5. Say, isn't this how the firey beards forum got started? My day job is archaeologist for the Tennessee Department of Transportation. I have 25 counties to look after, keeping the roads safe from (pre)history, and sometimes the other way 'round. I actually consider smithing to be more what and who I am, the day job pays the bills and provides insurance and the like. It's really kind of like working two jobs, actually. Good thing I like 'em both! the following is an addition after seeing some of the other stories!-Alan I was interested in smithing and all aspects of metalwork from an early age, but was clumsy and lacking in confidence. I'm a late bloomer in many respects, but once I finally developed a little eye-hand coordination at about age 19 I started accumulating books on the subject, and a few years later started accumulating equipment. I'd probably still be there if my then-girlfriend, now wife hadn't sent me to a smithing class at John C. Campbell Folk School, thus providing the kick in the rear I seem to need to get things done.
    1 point
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