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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/17/2023 in all areas

  1. Hi everyone, I recently decided I wanted to experiment with new leatherworking methods so I chose to make a small piece (in order not to waste too much leather if I messed up). I had this Kukri knife that I had from Nepal, where the scabbard was pretty scratched up during transport. I had come across a tooling technique in a 2017 post by Peter Johnsson which I was very interested in. Basically, it is using a hot awl to scorch and raise the leather (but I'll let Peter explain it here). Of course I forgot to document the making of the core, but basically it is made of using the veneer method (thin 8mm model airplane wood bound in glue) with the inside lined with felt (I use felt tape for this, which is a great material, as it is already adhesive and can cover whatever length you need). For the by-knives (Chakmak and Karda), I made two tiny (very cute) scabbards which were then glued on the main core. Traditionally they are in the back of the scabbard, but I wanted to experiment a bit and end up with a piece that could be a seen as a blade that was brought back from Asia and then given a more European medieval scabbard. Might not be for everyone, but I wanted this to be acting as a companion piece for another scabbard I am currently making for a Type XVIIIa sword. I covered the core in linen and then wrapped it in veg tan leather (sewn at the back). I used a bone knife to mould the leather around the by-knives and risers. I then drew the design of 15th century-style acanthus tendrils with a felt tip ink pen and then used a swivel knife to cut the design into the leather. I then used a seeder stamp to do the background. I finally used an awl that I heated on a flame to pierce the leather in specific places to create the illusion of volume. This was my first try so it could have been better, but overall I am very happy with the result. For the belt attachment, I used a leather lace that goes around the back to provide a space for the belt, as I saw on a video by Tod from Tod Cutler. Hope you guys enjoy it, I certainly had fun doing it!
    2 points
  2. Haven't posted anything in a good long while - my mother passed away unexpectedly at the start of the summer, and I pushed back all my orders to deal with the fallout from that... This is the first of those delayed projects to actually get finished. 12" nagasa hira-zukuri blade, forged from 1095. Copper habaki, brass seppas and steel tsuba, copper fuchi and kashira, sycamore tsuka wrapped in samegawa and lacquered deerskin lace ito, with nickel silver menuki and buffalo horn mekugi. The saya is sycamore, covered in ground tealeaves and lacquer, with buffalo horn koigouchi and kurigata, with cotton sageo. Let me know what you think...
    1 point
  3. Also finished this one today. Blade is suminagashi, engraved as a test for a different commission. Bolster and finial are blackened steel, with copper accents on the bolster. Handle is carved bog oak and sheath is tooled leather with copper rivets: let me know what you think...
    1 point
  4. I am just wrapping up this piece. While not a direct recreation, it is designed with stylistic elements from several museum pieces. I wanted a "working" dagger with more detailing than an armoury grade weapon, but not a high status piece. Being relatively reserved in details, it was important for me to try to balance those in an authentic way. The scabbard is made after construction examples in Covering the Blade with hardware again based on period examples. The locket has a roped top edge and rear staple type mounting loop for wear behind the left hip. The chape has a small acorn drag. This one is double edged, hollow ground, with somewhat minimized distal taper for a stiff parry and stout tip. All the wirework and turks heads are done in iron wire.
    1 point
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