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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/09/2024 in all areas

  1. Some time ago I finished Turkish jereeds [javelins] dated 17th century. Not much forging in this type of blades, but a lot of hand grinding with files. 13 inches long [32cm], weight 11,3oz [320g].
    2 points
  2. The pommel must have been interesting to make. Also, is the knuckle guard braised to the cross guard? It seems like the finger loop would have to have been. Doug
    1 point
  3. Nice Eric, the new pommel came out looking good.. nice carving on the handle too....
    1 point
  4. yes to what Alan said...... next time you could save time by forging into a triangle shape with hybrid v die ..... Those will make a wicked cut!
    1 point
  5. I think your intuition while forging and seeing no layers was a sharp one that you will listen to from now on.... I will add my agreement with Josh about welding 1095......
    1 point
  6. I find it very easy to weld, especially with good 15N20. If you can weld 1084/15N20 together, 1095 will be the same effort. I also checked NJSB and it's the same price as 1084. I buy my 1095 from Admiral Steel where I can get a piece of hot rolled 1095, 1.5"w x .125"t x 72 inches long for about 30 cents more than a 12 inch long piece of 1095 from NJSB. Nobody has to whack me in the head with a 2x2 to make that choice. They will cut it into 36" long pieces to help save on shipping too. All great observations and excellent testing. Whatever that steel was, I think you got what you were aiming for.
    1 point
  7. Great job on the hollow grinds!
    1 point
  8. All steel involved is purchased from NJSB. The billet that didn't etch is from an order I received in 2022 and the billet that did etch is from an order I got a couple months ago. A couple interesting things I've noticed as I work with the new billet of Damascus. I can see the pattern as I'm forging it, which I know is normal, but with the last billet I never once saw the pattern during forging. The pattern also did not appear in the heat treating process, and when I had it sanded to 600 grit I couldn't see even a shadow of it. At the time I wasn't concerned because I didn't consider it an absolute that the pattern should be visible at any of these stages. In hind sight, these were probably red flags that something was off. While the steel was bad to etch, I sharpened the blade and ran it threw a few tests to check my heat treat. I was mostly just having fun, but I took it to a piece of wood and while I did considerably damage to the wood I also took off quite a bit of the blade edge.(which given the ridiculously thin edge geometry, I fully expected.) However, it only ever broke off, no denting or rolling, so I think it hardened alright. Then I put it in the vice, 3" from the tip, and did a bend test. At around 50-60 degrees I heard it crack, chickened out and stopped. Cool thing is, it returned to straight. Then I took it back to around 60 degrees and a little more before it snapped. Grain structure is pretty good in my opinion. I find this interesting because I tried something different in the heat treating process. I normalize and thermal cycle everything in the forge after I'm done shaping it, eyeballing the different temperatures. I heat treat in a kiln though. For this knife I set the kiln for 1450°, put the blade in around 1100° an let it soak at 1450° for 2 minutes before quenching it in 140° canola oil. After the kiln cooled down, I put it in for tempering at 360° for 2 hours, and that's all the tempering I did. My thought process behind the tempering was, I wanted it to come out with a nice even straw color. Usually I do 400° for 2 hours for edcs and they come out purple and blue, which hasn't ever bothered me too much since they perform fine. However, I wanted to make this chef knife harder, sacrificing toughness for edge retention. With 360° I got a beautiful straw color on the blade after 2 hours. After testing it, I feel like I achieved my goal. I'm not sure my goal was what I should be going for, but it was a fun journey nonetheless.
    1 point
  9. Good for you!!!! and laying fallow for a couple years will do nothing but improve your work....and with that PhD you are going to be dangerous.....( one of those laughing icons) Have Fun!!
    1 point
  10. Got everything wire-wheeled and decided on a modest silver color for now. I figure it'll work as a good base when I have the chance to get a more funner color! And I got the plumbing (AKA Sputnik) temporarily assembled with stainless hardware. Next will be a cap for the end, and getting the fan attached
    1 point
  11. Definitely going to need an OA torch. That's a big hunk of iron! The forge body won't get too hot, so check out caliper paint and other medium-high heats. Like this sparkly blue: https://www.amazon.com/VHT-ESP451007-Anodized-Blue-Color/dp/B002NU4CWW/ref=sr_1_41?keywords=header%2Bpaint&qid=1694547069&sr=8-41&th=1 These: https://www.vhtpaint.com/high-heat/vht-flameproof-coating Or these... https://erapaints.com/product-category/caliper-paints/ I was kind of kidding at first, but now I want to paint one of those cast iron forges in high-vis yellow and black diagonal stripes with fluorescent green pinstriping...
    1 point
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