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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/05/2020 in Posts

  1. . Hello how are you! I haven't posted any work for a long time, but we finished several commissions during the time of the pandemic. little by little I will upload material to share! Medusa is a typical one-handed sword from the early Renaissance, with a type XV blade of the Oakeshott classification, very popular in the middle and late fourteenth century, its use reaching the fifteenth century. Its guard has spatulate beds, openwork with a Gothic trefoil, an ornamental shape composed of the outline of three superimposed rings, very popular at the time, used in Gothic tracery, heraldry, il
    15 points
  2. Hey everyone! I'm working on a kind of general Viking woman's knife. I drew inspiration from a bunch of different types of seaxes and knives, and distilled it into what you'll see here! It's maybe not quite a seax, but I don't think it's just a knife either. It's being made for a friend of mine in Iceland who gifted me some really amazing material when I was over there last year. She asked for 'a simple viking woman's knife' and I think I may have missed the mark on the 'simple' part, but it is what it is! I'll attach a bunch of photos like usual and maybe some reference I used fo
    13 points
  3. I decided to forge the longest early-medieval spearhead ever found in Poland. Its original find was found in the Lednica lake in 1961. It has a hexagonal socket. The blade is pattern-welded (four twist bars on each side). To forge it I used 19 cent. wrought iron and steel. It took 6 full day work days and. I used 120 kg of coke. here you can find complete cataloque of spears from Lednica lake: http://studialednickie.pl/wiadomosci/biblioteka-studiow-lednickich/66096ae1c4bcf6d985f3fd81714fdd9a.pdf
    12 points
  4. My latest Jarn Hond single edged viking sword....Hope you like it. I have been playing with replicating inlay (which i do not have the skill or patients for) with patternweld which I guess I do!
    11 points
  5. Still futzing with this one that I've been working on for the past few days as a distraction from the basket hilt that's breaking me (hopefully more on that front soon...). 1095 blade, hammered copper habaki, brass seppas, bog oak fuchi and kashira, stained and lacquered poplar burl tsuka, buffalo horn mekugi, stained elm saya sealed with shellac. Still got to play with the polish a bit and maybe make some menuki. And I still need to buy a new camera, but my car's in the shop, and it'll be another week before I find out how poor I am... let me know what yo
    11 points
  6. WARNING!! There may be just a tiny bit of bragging in this post. My 17yo son just came out to the shop and showed me his SAT scores. 1530 out of 1600! Puts him in the 99th percentile of all SAT takers! After almost losing him several times last year (Teenage depression is no joke. My wife and I both agree that 2020 has been a cakewalk compared to the hell we went through in 2019). To see him apply himself and come through it like this has been amazing. His experiences are driving him to go to school and become a psychiatrist so that he can help people deal with their issues
    11 points
  7. Last year I did a set of three skinners for a customer and he immediately ordered three more. Apologies for the pathetic photography, but here's what I came up with: I used 1084, bone slabs with G-10 liners, and brass pins. 600 grit finish. Sheaths were hand sewn, stained with iron acetate, sealed with bee's wax. This is not my preferred style of knife, but this is probably the best fit & finish I have pulled off to date. The whole duplication thing is not really so
    10 points
  8. Hi All, This is a commissioned piece for a friend who wanted a western style chef's knife. His only requirements were that it had to be mosaic, and that he wanted to use wood from an old hickory tree on his family farm. I started with a pile of 1084 and 15N20 bits: Then went through the usual rigmarole of getting them all stuck together... Here is a rare shot of me working. The customer wanted to come watch, so I put him to work with a camera..
    9 points
  9. Hi. I just finished my latest project. It is a replica of an early medieval (Viking Age) spearhead. It is a reconstruction of the find from Ciepłe (Poland). It is completely made of bloomery iron. I have used 3 kinds of materials: soft low carbon iron smelted from hematite ore, high carbon steel I made in Aristotle furnace, and high phosphorus low carbon iron smelted from bog ore. The socket is a wrap and welded. The pattern-welded twist bars are welded on both sides of the spear core. To weld twist pattern billets I used high carbon steel and P-iron, cutting edge is steel, socket and core is
    9 points
  10. Hi All Little Pattern welded hunter, I lost track of the amount of layers but around the 570, full tapered tang construction, brass bolster, Black Maire (NZ native) handle. Total length 23 cm, blade 11 cm
    9 points
  11. Mosaic Damascus (Filicetty flip) Stabilized Mallee Total length 33.5 cm, Blade 22.5 cm
    9 points
  12. Managed to finish this along with some other stuff this weekend! I start with paper templates to get the shape of the shape sorted out. When you bend the paper over, you can use your finger to crease the paper and cut it to shape. The 'staples' are made from pattern wire sheet that I cut and trim, then bend over a form. These get some gentle hammering with a plastic jewelry hammer with some leather or shop towel in between the silver and the hammer. This cinches the staples firmly around the leather. I do them one at a time so I can drill and peen the rivet with
    8 points
  13. Finished. Just got to add some leather straps. Thanks for the feedback and advice along the way.
    8 points
  14. This long weekend I managed to get one of the bunch of three folders I'm working on ready to add scales to prior to final assembly. The other two got new blades (one of them twice when the dovetail cutter slipped and broke through the first replacement blade ) and one got a new spring when it turned out the first one didn't want to be tweaked any further. All parts currently cooling down in their respective tempering ovens, the blades in the brick-filled toaster and the spring in the Evenheat. Here's the one that worked from the beginning. I kind of lik
    7 points
  15. I can't say no to free tools. When considering the purchase of a lathe last year, the seller offered to throw in what he called a 'surface grinder' to sweeten the deal . That machine ended up being a Fox Machine Co. horizontal mill from the turn of the century, and it's turned out to be a remarkably useful implement. Yes, I love to do things by hand as much as the next craftsman, but there's nearly equal satisfaction in using a 130 year old piece of machinery that rolled off the foundry floor when swords were still being carried as sidearms. Blade fullers were never
    7 points
  16. 1080 /15N20 crushed W's laddered steel,stainless fittings and stabilized maple burl The finished knife
    7 points
  17. I sliced the end off a damascus billet and etched it to see what I had. Then I decided to make this out of the slice. I offered it up on FB to the first person to show me a receipt for a $100 donation to a food bank. In not much more than an hour, someone took me up on it, and he's literally walking distance from the house . With my fat backsmith fingers I made a braided hemp cord for it, and a copper hanger, and I threw in a nice chevron bead. Not too shabby, and it's nice to work on a project with a quick finish. Geoff
    6 points
  18. Two years ago I got the chance to document several medieval swords with my friend Greg Cimms, it was a epic day in NYC neither of us are likely to ever forget. I have sat on the tracings and measurements for a long time now waiting for the right time / project to use then. A few months ago I invited another friend of mine Jordan LaMothe down to the shop for a visit, as sort of a Bussmans holiday we decided to do a epic sword build. We began by planning out the build, using the proportions, weight and thickness measurements of the original sword we would build a modern sword.
    6 points
  19. First forging session in my new shop! got these 8 blades done in pre-laminated stainless clad super blue. The bigger Gyutos are 250 mm edge length. They are heat treated and ready for grinding now. I have ground the profiles after forging, but the bevels and distal tapers are as forged. The forging is reasonably clean, so I'm hopeful i can get away with lower bevel only grinding (quicker, I dont like grinding much), and Kurouchi finish for the rest. The spines, and choils etc were finished prior to heat treat. I owe s
    6 points
  20. Alright, so my microscope arrived - and I've downloaded a couple of Sam Alfano's instructional videos, namely Scrollwork from start to finish, as well as how to draw scrolls.. Here are the results. So, first off I had to draw my very first scroll. I followed Sam Alfano closely - watching his video on my computer while drawing. I ended up with this - my first scroll. (I skipped the beginner scroll and went straight for the intermediate) Now, having watched his "Engraving scrolls" video from start to finish, I threw myself into doing the now classic "toner acet
    6 points
  21. Some testing...... and ... now on to the scabbard. I really am no wood worker but here it is so far.
    6 points
  22. Hello all. I chose summer as a season and every summer means a trip to any beach, (not too crowded), usually Florida. Even as a kid, first minute on arrival...... gotta go to the oceans edge. Well, 68 years old now and that hasn’t changed. Just something about see the coastline up close in all directions. So I chose something of a diver’s knife design, with synthetic scales the resemble the colors of a wave crashing the shore. I put a long curved wedge to simulate the natural curve seen along any shoreline. I had a “horse sheet” idea to tie that swedgeline through the hardware. Like I sai
    6 points
  23. Just recently finished this one out. Same design as the one I did earlier this year, but with Thuya Burl. Blade - Wagon Wheel Wrought / 80Crv2. Handle - Thuya / SS hardware.
    5 points
  24. 5 points
  25. Thank you Alan! I don't know about wizard, but I may know just about enough to get myself into trouble! Larry, if you want to try something interesting, get a blade ready for hardening, and heat just the edge in the forge. When you have a fairly even heat zone around where you want your hamon to be, quench in oil! (or water if you're feeling dangerous) Like Alan said, cross section and the speed and depth of hardening make a big difference! The heat zone you create can influence quite a nice hamon in steels that are ready to accept this, like W2 or 1095 for instance. This is a W2
    5 points
  26. I took a couple of days off work to spend time with Jim Austin in Oakland and take his axe forging class. The objective was to transform the bar of steel into that axe head: This is basically all forging work without really much grinding and or filing afterwards. We made two axes and here is the one I made (under Jim's excellent tutelage): If you are interested, I can also post some photos from all the forging stages.
    5 points
  27. Not exactly blade related, I intended to have a long overdue clean up in the shop this evening. I was moving the bench saw out so I could clean when I found an off cut of 1095 /15n20 damascus that I made in the spring. You know how it goes you pick something up and you instinctively have a plan for it, Cleaning kit went away and in just under an hour I made, hardened an etched a keyring bottle opener, Far more interesting than cleaning up....... Always tomorrow I suppose
    5 points
  28. I managed to get the blade shape, and bevels filed in. And a quick test etch because I can't ever resist looking at the pattern. The edge is 3.5", it'll be 4" to the guard.
    5 points
  29. This is such a great thread. The first knife is when I started back in 2010: and the second is one that I made I believe four years ago of which I am still very proud. The last knife is one of my most recent but personally most significant.
    5 points
  30. Latest one off my bench. 4 1/2” O1 utility with a bronze guard. Handle is dyed & stabilized Hempwood. I don’t do a lot of mirror finishes, but decided to buff this one out. Thanks for looking.
    5 points
  31. This is what I worked on the past few days. Not blade related but something for a Christmas present. Made it from 15N20, 1084, and 52100. I twisted it several times, then cut about 7" off to make this cross. Only thing I didn't think about when I started this is that there are 26 separate surfaces to grind, sand, and polish. I ended up not sanding the sides and bottom. That saved me several hours. Sanded it down to 2500 grit and then buffed it. Heat treated it, etched in coffee, then then tempered it at 520° to turn it blue. It measures 4" x 2 5/8", and made to christian cross specifications.
    4 points
  32. A friend ordered a kitchen knife as a Christmas present for his future father-in-law, so I made him this - clay hardened CS70, bubinga and copper, with a bit of filework: let me know what you think...
    4 points
  33. Aim for the top, there's more room there. Quoted this morning by Senator Lamar Alexander.
    4 points
  34. As time goes by things change! however this place still has a large place in my heart and was part of an awakening I will always be gratefull for. It still stands as a rare example of how one should behave and interact on the internet ...with passion , understanding and a leash on the ego.
    4 points
  35. I wasn't able to get to much done on this sword before the holiday, but I did manage to get the guard filed to final shape. I had ground out the guard on a 36 grit belt on a 8" wheel just to get it close. I followed that with second cut half 6" round file followed by a #2 swiss cut , I should be able to start polishing at 400 grit other than some piling that galled my finish (old file that I need to replace soon) should go quick at 220 grit though. I'll get it to 220 before I start cutting the settings for the stones.
    4 points
  36. I second John on the tray behind the vise. You can even make one that swings out of the way, but any tray there is worth its space in gold. I learned two things today, one good, one not so good but informative nonetheless. Under the "informative but not so good" heading, I learned today that I need to pay more attention when making a run of folder blades/spring sets. Turns out if you're off by 0.030 in a certain critical dimension (distance from pivot hole to bottom of tang), make sure you notice before you spend a day doing the HT on a set of three. One set worked perfectly, o
    4 points
  37. I'm making some progress. Most of the small bits are done, everything needs some time in the tumbler. I decided to include a Sigan Dhu, so that is taking some time, buttons for the scabbard are done. Lots of this and that. Next it goes off for the scabbard. I'll do all of the final fit up after it gets back.
    4 points
  38. Looking at the first trial of Oroshigane ( see picture below ), the carbon content is higher than first thought somewhere between 1% carbon and 2 % carbon. Todays run yielded 4 lbs of very high carbon steel at a yield of 80% as 5 lbs of flattened bloom iron were processed. No attempt was made to sort the input of the process by carbon content. Fragments were wire brushed, cut to no larger than 2.5 inches in any direction and no thicker than 5/16 inches.,See picture below. The bloom was attached to the furnace wall which was damaged during extracting. I will be running
    4 points
  39. I did not take any video as that would have easily doubled the amount of time but here are some photos. Using a center punch to show the lines where material for the eye is going to be separated: Fullering on the line - the goal was to split the punched dots in half: With the material separated, the rest of the eye is fullered to increase the width to about 3 1/2 in: I'll post more pictures when I have some time. That said, watching Jim demonstrate all this makes you appreciate the skill and experience to do this efficiently.
    4 points
  40. Gonna be making a bunch of these herb choppers this week
    4 points
  41. For a long time I have been collecting materials on the construction of these .... interesting things from the early era of bronze from Europe. In English-language literature they are called halberds, in German-language Stabdolch-staffdagger, in Polish-language scepter dagger, and disputes about their purpose continue to this day. It is known for sure that they were symbols of power, it is assumed, after the surviving Irish specimens, that they could also be used in combat ....... I made two specimens: one, the one with three pseudo-rivets, continental based on finds from the Unetica cul
    4 points
  42. If you guys lived closer I would do you up a fish feast and try my hardest to find Gerald a large snake or crocodile. Now I’m getting hungry! There sits the mighty “Silver Catfish” an I be her Captain! A cod I did not get to eat. There is always a bigger fish!
    3 points
  43. I came here after being insulted by the elitist attitudes on IFI that developed after I joined. The respect and courtesy given to all here is the key for it's popularity. May that, and the free flow of knowledge never end here...........................
    3 points
  44. Been a while.........what a rollercoaster. I had a slight household accident that left me with a not so slight concussion, meaning about 5 weeks of headaches and no exercise. I was still eating like a champion to make up for not smoking, and without much effort I picked up another 10kg, meaning the average bathroom scale could no longer handle me....... About 2 weeks back into exercising, slowly loosing that weight, not back where I started yet but in the mean time I've gotten much stronger and fitter, some parts of my body are probably stronger now than they have ever been.
    3 points
  45. I asked him to bring along 3 designs he might be interested in, didn't get past the photo of an FS dagger I got into his head that Iron+Carbon=Steel, explained a bit about alloys and talked a bit about the "recipe" for a few steels I have on hand. Explained the basics of the heat treat, and there I think I lost him a little bit I had him grind bevels into a piece of mild steel to get used to the machines, and realised he lacked the finger/hand strength, and he was a bit scared of the machine and the sparks. Initially planned on him using 6mm 5160 but realised 3mm
    3 points
  46. Today I decided to do something I have been putting off though wanting to do for a long while, give chape making a go. This was another first for me. In the end I found my cross pien hammer in the vice was a good little anvil to shape the two halves with. I still need to refine and sand the chape some more but overall I am happy with the result. It fits fairly well in the last pic but I will need to shape the wood down further to get a proper fit. I was thinking of heating the chape in the forge and hot fitting it. Kind of like burning in a tang.
    3 points
  47. .. such .... "Leader set" from the Bronze Age: a halberd (a sign of power), a dagger and a knife. Everything is lined with several hundred years old black oak. The halberd (dagger scepter Polish) is 65 cm long, the blade is 27 cm.Find from England The dagger is 31.5 cm long and weighs 200 grams.Find from France. The knife is 27 cm long and weighs 100 grams.Find from Switzerland.
    3 points
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