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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/24/2022 in Posts

  1. Early style knife forged from 5160, walnut scales and pewter bolsters
    10 points
  2. Here is something a bit different, I have been working on this piece for a long time. Blade 476 layer 1084 and 15 N20 steel, 73.5 cm from guard Guard forged from 364 layer W pattern mild and 15N20 steel. Total length 93 cm. Hilt Sambar stag 19.5 cm inc. guard Point of balance 12 cm from guard Weight 1kg Total weight of Sterling silver approx. 250 gm Amethyst (enhanced) 67.3 ct 28.5x 21.63 mm, see attachment. Scabbard 3.5 mm leather with Sterling silver fittings.
    9 points
  3. long ago there was a guy on here names Dick Sexstone , he was the first guy I ever saw that would treat a knife as a canvas. He made a knife that wasn't just themed if was a picture, he had a technique he demoed at ashoken one year he called "die displaced damascus" that he used to make landscapes, in damascus. (among other things) the idea of patterning a picture is something that suck with me for a long time now. recently I saw Joshua Prince do a piece with a plug welded "moon", that gave me the idea to do a moon rise or sunset, I started playing around with this piece. (it took seve
    8 points
  4. This one has a couple of hilt details inspired by a Nagroli piece from 1540, along with my own spin. The blade is 34.5", and the total mass is 1093g. The blade is a diamond cross section throughout, and the ricasso is left with a wide, rounded edge. The scabbard is a laminated core with sewn leather covering, ricasso guards and a steel chape. More photos and details on my site.
    8 points
  5. Just finished this guy for my table at Blade show, 400 layer ladder pattern blade this some of the most chatoyant steel I have ever made, the video doesn't do it justice. Nickel silver guard, curly maple handle inlaid in silver in a pattern based of one of Bill Moran's knives . Knife is a full take down assembled with a twist pattern Damascus nut. MP PXL_20220519_172854535.mp4 PXL_20220519_173034584.mp4
    7 points
  6. Glued this together last night. This is a fairly faithful interpretation of what an authentic early 18th century sgian dubh might have looked like, though it's not a direct copy, more an amalgam of 3 originals. The steel is 1075+Cr, 3mm thick and 3 1/2" long, which I normalised 3x at descending heats and cycled a few times just around critical to drop the hardenability. The handle is elm, with simple basketweave carving, stained and given a single coat of finishing oil. The sheath is less authentic, as it will be used for hunting, so I added a belt loop and reinforced it with rivets. The secon
    7 points
  7. A few months ago I started a project to try and make dishwasher resistant knives and it ended up being a really interesting way to explore the different handle options that are out there. One thing I ended up getting into was resin casting, which I had a bit of experience with, but no real proficiency. I ended up making three "models" of handle; a small one for paring/ultra-lightweight camp knives (think bird and trout), a large one for chef knives, and one with more finger protection for fillet/bonding knives (though that last one I still need to iron some kinks out of). You can see my proces
    7 points
  8. Got quite a bit done yesterday. Finished tooling the scabbard and dyed it and peened the sword together. Last major issue left is making a somewhat presentable chape
    7 points
  9. First I went back to the vise, removed the dye with acetone, and went over the whole inlay with a smooth chasing chisel to drive the silver into all the undercuts and barbs, followed by the ball end of my chasing hammer to really make sure. Incidentally, this also work-hardens the silver so it's less likely to peel out of the inlet while filing it flush. Drawfiled flush: Tomorrow's guild meeting day, so that's it until next weekend. I had time to do a few more inlays (this one took 1.5 hours start to finish, including cutting the silver), but
    7 points
  10. This is the last of the giant bronze age dirks that I still had to finish (cast and finished 3 of them years ago). It's been held back by a lot of time being a dad, building a room for my daughter, extra pressure due to Covid restrictions on the family, arranging the wedding ceremony, having to restore my 70+ year old cargo tricycle to be used during the wedding and many, many other things in between that did not left me with time and energy to finish it. Many hours went into it of filing with tiny needle files getting in all the corners and surfaces, sanding, polishing. Now after nearly 3 yea
    6 points
  11. Phillip seems to be having fun:
    6 points
  12. Not in the shed but a day in the kitchen today. 13lb of flour is the base for these loaves. After they are sliced up into appropriate sized loaves and bagged ready for the freezer the oblogatory test slice with butter is enjoyed
    6 points
  13. Hi, today i have a little bit a unusuall thing. I made a sword scabbard for my friend, but it was for LARP sword...so it is bit bigger. I am adding it here just because of some metal work(bronze, copoer, silver) on belt and scabbard. It is made in rohirrim style as well. I hope next time it will be reall damascus sword which i am going to make this year...
    6 points
  14. Got the pins peened on the waki grip and added a buttplate. To help with the aged look I chose a dye that is quite hard to apply evenly and went out of my way to apply it as unevenly and badly as I could And of course I was out of the thickness of brass I want to use for the sheath fitting will brush the guard up a little bit and once everything is peened on I'll give it some more fuming to even out the patina and hopefully even get some of it to stain onto the leather. Then I sewed up the grip and wrapped parts of it
    6 points
  15. I've never been terribly successful as a mushroom hunter, but we found a few last night. Took this shot for a lark, and thought it turned out well enough to share on a knife forum
    6 points
  16. Wow, I had some catching up to do on this thread. I've enjoyed this one, but always wait until I have some time to really read it before checking in. Great progress, and craftsmanship! Oh, would someone remind me to never eat with any of Alan's period looking pieces?
    6 points
  17. Thanks- I like bright colors when you need to find it. Miami Slice version of a model I call the "Warehouser".
    6 points
  18. well, got the first half all done. Getting a little stressed with time so further patinination will have to wait for now
    5 points
  19. 5 points
  20. This looks like a good solid base for further steps
    5 points
  21. The pour/ingot thingy is allowed to cool. The flux-glass is broken off leaving behind a small button of high C cast iron (?) somewhere in the 4-5% range according to Frank. This is then laid on the end of a piece of low C wrought iron and put into the forge. It melts rather quickly. You have to be very careful removing the piece so as not to spill the liquid. You then smear the button across the surface of the iron. It spreads like butter on hot toast. I figured out after a few tries, that I cou
    5 points
  22. Long story to get to the funny part at the end: When I was about 20 I worked one summer for a company that sold industrial pumping and spraying equipment. One of our customers was a foundry that did centrifugal castings, and they used equipment from us to spray a mold release on the inside of the tubular molds. In this case ~10' long 4" tubes used to cast starting stock for piston rings. Like most spray system customers, they felt the secret to better atomization was to crank up the air pressure. Also like most customers, when they got poor atomization results becau
    5 points
  23. Hi i would like to offer this knife. It has san mai blade, made of wrought iron and K720 on the edge, the handle is made of birch bark and bronze. Handle is 10 cm long and blade has 8 cm. I would sell it for 200 USD. Feel free to ask some questions
    5 points
  24. Thanks Joshua! Here is a small bit of progress, the handle here is at 800 grit, still some problem areas to fix but it's getting there.
    5 points
  25. I'm experimenting with using gallery wire for ferrules. Seems to be working so far...
    4 points
  26. Just needed to do some forging. I did a couple small knives and a start on a damascus integral, and this stuff
    4 points
  27. Recently I've been working on replica of a "Moravian" axe from Bardy, Kołobrzeg Poland (by the Baltic Sea). It was the most "awkward" axe I've ever forged. It's not finished yet, but as I managed to forge it and there is only grindings and HT to bo done I decieded to put it in "Show and tell". This shape could be forged in variety of ways, and I deceided to make it by forge welding, not forging of one piece of iron. I's been welded of seven elements including steel for the cutting edge (NCV1/80CrV2). All the rest is wrought iron.
    4 points
  28. Much nicer now than when I started. In the old days we'd set up a grid out of string to map the finds, trying hard not to trip over it. Now we just set up a total station (AKA laser transit) on the site datum and shoot everything in as it's found. The computer maps it for you in three-dimensional space. I learned it with a 1929 navy surplus optical transit, steel surveyors tape, wooden stadia rod, and folding wood rulers. The guy who taught me learned from one of the guys who did the WPA archaeology for all the TVA dams in the 1930s-1940s. They had total stations by the time I
    4 points
  29. I had the opportunity to forge out some steel recently made…indirectly related to the topic here.
    4 points
  30. Started on the tooling on the scabbard. Good thing with sewing it on the edge is twice as much space for it Various different kinds of wyverns and wyrms and felt a need to add a rabbit in there too
    4 points
  31. from: https://i-ate-nt-dead.tumblr.com/post/186312219753/the-eater-of-socks-looked-up-at-the-wizards
    4 points
  32. I made these for a woodworking friend and decided to capture the process in video - @Alan Longmire gets a shoutout, too
    4 points
  33. Another one from today's posts. "We also found an arrow with an antler arrowhead during our 2019 fieldwork. The arrowhead is quite similar in shape to iron arrowheads from AD 300 onwards. Perhaps the arrow dates to the centuries preceding this date. Based on observations in 2013 and 2019, the ice patch retreated 100 m in the front during these six years. So far, we have only been able to survey a small part of this newly exposed foreland. We plan to return to the site with a proper large-scale systematic survey. The eight arrows recovered from the site, with only limited survey, tell
    4 points
  34. I figured you knew about this process, or at least had a version of it. I might need to pick your brain a little at some point when I get around to trying to forge this thing out with the yellow end. This thing weighs 22 pounds and is 2.7% C. Ray calls it Tamahagane, but it's more like cast iron. He and a couple other smiths I know have forged this stuff out into blades with spectacular results. I don't know why I'm such a sucker for big, ugly, hunks of steel.
    4 points
  35. Day 4 of this guard, still a lot to do to the individual pieces before assembly and then there will be even more filing after that too The back plate has a different design that I'm still getting the shape of but four of the holes match up with the front and will be opened up on the horn pieces as well
    4 points
  36. This is the theory behind early iron age "currency bars" of iron. These always have a socket or loop forged into the ends, in theory to prove the quality of the bar, since badly refined iron won't roll into a socket or loop.
    4 points
  37. Making the button is called Direct Crucible Reduction. I've done that. Smearing the cast button on wrought is a variation on the Brescian process of steelmaking, and I've never gotten that to work. Congratulations! That Arizona black sand is titaniferous magnetite just like Japanese iron sand. That's the blue left in the crucible. Tai Goo used to make wootz-ish crucible steel out of it, using calcium carbonate in the form of oyster shell pellets as flux. Glass works as well.
    4 points
  38. I did things! I made fire, and put iron in it! Last evening was a rare occasion when I was on my own at home. So I pulled out my makeshift forge for hardening two seaxes that have been waiting for many years. That seems to have worked well. And since I still had a good amount of glowing charcoal, I forge welded a bit of layered W2 to a piece of wrought.
    4 points
  39. I've been on a hell of a sword push lately, but my primary work is in small to medium edc type knives and kitchen cutlery. I'll post some of it in this thread. To kick things off, here is a new pattern of river knife I'm testing out (I'll be doing some guiding this season after a long hiatus). This one is in 154cm with G10 scales.
    3 points
  40. I started in Oct 2018 with files and a map gas torch. I wanted to try first with something small so I designed a 3 finger fixed blade pocket knife 3 1/2 years later, I just finished my 60th knife Here is one of my recent projects. a traditional tanto
    3 points
  41. First pass on the etch. FullSizeRender.MOV
    3 points
  42. Other way is after the basic forging and prior to HT, curve it laterally around the horn of the anvil and then clamp it in a vise when cool and cut it in with a half-round file and then straighten out the blade. You should have a nice nail nick tapering in width towards each end, no problem.
    3 points
  43. Forgot to mention, the machine in use here is a 1941 Atlas/Craftsman 12-48 lathe with a milling attachment. Darned handy, but way too long and underpowered. 6" swing over the ways, 48" bed, unless I have the back gears engaged it'll take a max cut of .020 in steel. But it's what I have. Anyway, I then drill and tap 3/8-24 NF, still in the lathe for precise alignment, but hand turn tapping only. Then I roughed the bowl from the wrought. 2" long, 0.8" diameter. First I turn one end down to 1/2" to fit the counterbore, then I cut a fat 1/4" of that down to
    3 points
  44. I'll start a new WIP on this one... BTW, that's some nice looking bread, Garry! Bet the kitchen smelled great.
    3 points
  45. Dude, I still occasionally apply the Secret Desert Wood Finish (ear wax and nose oil) for my more "rustic" pieces.
    3 points
  46. Been practising a little. Still a long way to go, but this one kinda looks like a scroll.
    3 points
  47. Two more arrows. "One of the arrows was still stuck in the ice and we had to melt it out carefully, using lukewarm water. The preservation of this 1500-year-old arrow is just awesome! Arrowhead, sinew, shaft, fletching – it’s all there. This arrow will be a prime target for our on-going arrow research program. Finds of steering feathers are very rare (4/6)" Note the twine or wrapped cordage is either braided or twisted. "Julian holds one of the other well-preserved arrows found on the site during our 2019 fieldwork. The arrowhead is of a rare typ
    3 points
  48. If you do try it, please post your results and anything you find out along the way. I for one, would be very interested in seeing what results other smiths have with this technique. As for forging the cast, I asked Ray and a couple other guys about that big hunk and how to forge it. Ray's advice: Soak it at about 1250-1300F for about an hour. Take it up to 1600F and cut it into useable chunks. Forge in really short sessions at about 1600-1900F moving small amounts at a time. Flatten, hot cut, stack and weld. lather rinse repeat. Mostly I think this is just shedding carbon until i
    3 points
  49. Hey all. So I've recently began incorporating engraving into my knifework. The first few knives I've engraved are all skeletal. No scales or hardware, but fully engraved and inlayed with 24k gold. Heat treating without scale is of course my main concern. Well now that I'm about ready to heat treat my first one (80crv2) I am pretty stressed about oxidation ruining the fine detail. I've put about 60 hours and a couple hundred bucks into it so it's imperative I get it right the first time. Well I decided to try a test piece. My plan was t
    3 points
  50. Just another post on the Book of Faces today. A complete arrow.
    3 points
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