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  1. Hi. I just finished my latest project. It is a replica of an early medieval (Viking Age) spearhead. It is a reconstruction of the find from Ciepłe (Poland). It is completely made of bloomery iron. I have used 3 kinds of materials: soft low carbon iron smelted from hematite ore, high carbon steel I made in Aristotle furnace, and high phosphorus low carbon iron smelted from bog ore. The socket is a wrap and welded. The pattern-welded twist bars are welded on both sides of the spear core. To weld twist pattern billets I used high carbon steel and P-iron, cutting edge is steel, socket and core is soft iron.
    24 points
  2. Hey everyone! I taught a class at the New England School of Metalwork over the last week and thought I would share some images here! I took a ton of photos over the class, but will kind of pair it down to the images of the demo spear I made, and a few shots of all of the spears together. We studied and made three pattern welded billets based on historical patterns seen on various originals. We also drew out a bunch of wrought iron sheet from round stock for the sockets. We also made some really nice edge steel, 480 layers of 15n20 and 1095 The wrought iron sheet with the templates ready for cutting. A few of the twist bars for my spear, 24 twists on the left, and one of the interrupted twists for the other side of the spear. Beginning to square the twist bars to assemble the spear. 5 bars welded into one! I like to do my welding sequences as close together as possible. I laid the twist bars and wrought iron core together, and forge welded the five bars in the same step. A quick, and apparently out of focus, test etch of the side of the spear with the interrupted twists in it. The edge bar has been wrapped around the core and forge welded in place, then drawn out! Test etch on the other side of the spear. Wrought iron socket ready for forge welding. The plan! And the result! Next to the demo I made in preparation for the class. Something kind of interesting! I left my spear thick to account for grinding into the center of my pattern and to avoid drawing it out too long. I am a big fan of complex multibar patterns, and this was a fun exercise in making precise patterns in a different blade shape than what I'm usually doing. The finish ground weight! This was after hardening and tempering of course. And here's the finished piece! Made from 7 separate parts, an iron core, 4 twist bars, a wrapped around edge, and the socket! The twists are 11 layers of 1095 and 15n20 and the edge is 480 layers of the same. It was finished by being put on a 7 foot Ash haft, and its kind of amazing to hold something this alive on a 7 foot pole! We're in the process of figuring out where to display it in the shop now! And a shot of all of the spears finished during the week! All have different patterns and constructions and showcase each students creativity beautifully! I'm super proud of the work these guys did, and will share a shot of all of us together in a bit. I don't think I've ever seen this many newly made spears in one place, and much less of this quality! IMG_4738.MOV
    18 points
  3. “Far over the misty mountains cold, To dungeons deep and caverns old, We must away, Ere break of day, To claim our long forgotten Gold the latest Seax by Myself and Petr Florianek... My blade but Petr has surpassed himself with the blade carving , handle and sheath ...My fave to date. hope you like it. [
    18 points
  4. Just put this one together - another facebook makers challenge that got out of hand: clay hardened 1095 blade - I haven't measured it but it's about 8", and thin, not much over 1/8th", with a false edge on one side. Wrought iron bolster and mild steel guard, with mild steel and nickel silver spacers. the steel has been oil-blued, and the ns is sculpted and polished. Oil-blued steel pommel plate with carved mammoth ivory panels. Macassar ebony handle carved with high relief knotwork, with steel pins. Scabbard is laminated millboard covered in lambskin, with a forged and polished mild steel chape, with a knurled bog oak bead at the tip, and a turned steel Sam Browne stud mounted on a sculpted NS face plate. This one took way to much time, but it was a lot of fun. Let me know what you think...
    17 points
  5. I got the photo proof back yesterday from Whetstone studio of my full set. Some of these you have likely seen already. These are the five that were in the judging room
    17 points
  6. A few weeks ago a kid (I say kid, college senior doing an honors thesis, probably 21 or so ) came to my local guild meeting to ask if anyone could help him with a sword. His honors thesis involves hand-making everything that appears in a portrait of a Scots nobleman of the mid-18th century. He's already made the shoes and belts, woven the fabric for the hose and jacket, made the hat, and all sorts of other things. Since he also makes flintlock rifles by hand, and as such proved he's no idiot, I agreed to see what he could do with the equipment I have that he needed to help with the sword blade. Eight shop hours over the last two days, and here he is with a completed backsword blade, ground to 120. He did most of the forging and all the grinding except for a couple of tricky bits. 5/16" x 1.3" 1084 starting stock. Forged yesterday, ground and partially drawfiled today. I think he looks kinda proud.
    16 points
  7. Hi Guys It's been an age since I've posted on here. I hope everyone one is well and navigating these very strange times that we find ourselves in at the moment. This is the latest Bowie to exit the shop and I hope you enjoy looking over her. All comments and critique always welcome. All the best Steve The blade for this D-guard Bowie is made from W-1 high carbon tool steel. The blade is 283mm long, 44mm wide and just over 5mm thick on the spine which has vine file work along its edge. There's a clay quenched temper line along its cutting edge and a Spanish notch at the heel. The overall length of the knife is 430mm just a tad over 17" long. There are three coined nickel silver spacers and a gun blued wrought iron bolster which has been filed around its circumference. The two sections of the gun blued carbon steel D-guard have vine file work on their outside edges rising up to a clam shell on the top. At the bottom of the guard one side pierces the other connecting the two with a forged finial. The back piece of the guard is filed to match the outside of the Sambar stag and is held in place by a gun blued carbon steel finial nut. The hand stitched leather Mexican belt loop style sheath is dyed mahogany brown and black with a front panel of python skin. There are a multitude of small round rivets around the sheath and frog as well as leather lacing, a brass patterned conch shell with brass cones, beads and horsehair tassels. This piece also comes with its own custom made display stand.
    16 points
  8. Hey everyone! I'm working on a kind of general Viking woman's knife. I drew inspiration from a bunch of different types of seaxes and knives, and distilled it into what you'll see here! It's maybe not quite a seax, but I don't think it's just a knife either. It's being made for a friend of mine in Iceland who gifted me some really amazing material when I was over there last year. She asked for 'a simple viking woman's knife' and I think I may have missed the mark on the 'simple' part, but it is what it is! I'll attach a bunch of photos like usual and maybe some reference I used for inspiration. The blade is a nice 6 bar pattern welded blade I made last year. It has iron on the spine, four twist bars, two on each side, and a folded steel edge with no clay hamon. I took some of the bone for the bolster and marked out a rough shape of the hole I needed. Next drill a slightly undersized hole, and jewelers saw to make the slot. Next some careful time with some files, and you're fit! Bolster and handle material fit up. The bog oak is some wonderful material from Utö, Sweden given to me by a friend. It was salvaged from a pre Viking aged ship wreck. The piece was just the right size, some very careful grinding resulted in a clean handle! I made a quick sketch of what I wanted the handle to be like after tracing the blade. I still need to add the ring dots and the silver ring and line decoration. Pictured is a beautiful silver working hammer I picked up from Jeff Helmes. I've used it for lots of silver and copper work now! When doing tied rings I find it helpful to make a quick mockup in iron wire, as its easy to bend and you can see exactly how much material you need for the given size of ring you are making. The silver is forged to a taper on each side, so this helps you make sure you don't end up with six inches of wire when you only needed 4.5 I used an inverted cone burr in a flex shaft to make the square hole in the back of the handle for the ring mount. After it was fit I carefully drilled the hole for the silver pin and assembled the whole thing. I used a checkering file to careful make the lines in the back of the handle. The ring dots were made with these beautiful tools from Evelyn Stier. Next is the sheath work. I usually try and pick a piece of period art to use as inspiration for the design and take it from there. In this case I chose a piece of carved wood from the National Icelandic Museum. It had a beautiful kind of flow, so I modified the design a little and set to coming up with a design for the sheath. These are two photos I got from this forum some time ago, and they are the kind of general Gotlandesque design I like for small knives like these. I took the general shapes and ideas from these historical sheaths and once I had the form sorted out, it was time to figure out the actual embellishments. Pretty much the way it'll end up! I make a paper template around the knife once I've wrapped it. Transferred to leather, then wet formed around the protected knife. Clean your hands carefully before you do this. If you're not going to dye your leather this is even more important because wet leather will take dirt very readily. I carefully wet the leather in warm water. I don't want it soaked, but I wet the inside until bubbles start to come out. After that I place the knife inside and work from the bolster to the front and back. I find that this is just massaging the leather into a shape you want. This is why sopping wet leather is not good for this, you want it to take the shape but retain a little memory. After the initial forming is done I will remove the knife and let the leather dry for one of two days. This way I make sure the knife doesn't get rusted at all, and the leather is able to dry more quickly. In this case the tip of the sheath was not low enough. It was too straight for my liking, I wanted a more dropped appearance to it, but if I tried to do it at the time that I was doing the rest of the forming I would get the leather to bunch up and not sit flat. Instead I waited for the leather to dry, and then selectively wet just the tip area of the sheath so that I could form it more accurately to the blade and the rest would not deform. Next step is to glue the sheath shut. I use titebond original glue. I've been using it for years and have never had any issues with rust, but it must be the original titebond wood glue. This shot shows the benefits of wet forming. You get a very clean and close fit to your blade and handle. I glue by putting the knife inside the sheath, and opening the sheath so I can see inside. I carefully place a bead of glue from the tip to the top of the sheath and use my finger to spread the glue to about 1/8 inch from the knife. It is important that this layer of glue is thin, as when you massage the sheath shut you do not want it to spread to the knife. Wash your hands very carefully after applying the glue, then massage the seam closed for a few minutes. I tend to do this for maybe 20 minutes until the glue does not separate when you let go. Next is the trimming and tooling. I usually trim the excess with a bandsaw and belt grinder. I start by creating the frame for the design to sit. Next I use a very soft pencil to begin to draw in the rough design. I use a metal burnishing tool to begin to press the lines into the leather. You can experiment with doing it dry or with little bits of water. I keep a shadow dish with water in it to gently wet the areas I'm working with my finger. I use a few drops and then wipe away any excess. You want damp, not soaking wet. That is the difference between the clean lines and the more 'jagged' ones you see in the right side of the photo below. I often start stippling when I am working on the main lines in an area. Leather has a lot of give, so you often have to go back and forth between line work and stippling, wet and dry. Partly done. I'll still go back over the lines to make the definition better later. Stippling tool, made with a small round burr in a dremel on a piece of steel, then carefully ground the excess material away. And bottom section done! Pictured are the tools I use for all of the leather work. ' And I did the rest of the leather work, added some black dye! It may seem obvious, but let the dye dry for a few hours, and then clean the excess off the surface with a shop towel. Then you can use a soft cotton rag to buff the leather to a nice shine. Cleaning and buffing also brings out the grain of the leather. Here it is next to the sketch I cut out. Next I will make the silver fittings. Another ring and some nice plate fittings. Anyway that's it for now! I'll be updating this as I get a chance to work on the silver in a few weeks hopefully. Hope you guys enjoy and some useful info is in here!
    16 points
  9. . Hello how are you! I haven't posted any work for a long time, but we finished several commissions during the time of the pandemic. little by little I will upload material to share! Medusa is a typical one-handed sword from the early Renaissance, with a type XV blade of the Oakeshott classification, very popular in the middle and late fourteenth century, its use reaching the fifteenth century. Its guard has spatulate beds, openwork with a Gothic trefoil, an ornamental shape composed of the outline of three superimposed rings, very popular at the time, used in Gothic tracery, heraldry, illustrations, etc. as Christian symbolism. The pommel is chiseled with Medusa on one side and a memento mori on the other. The grip is completed with a leather "chappe" or rain cover. The blade is forged from 1070 carbon steel. The scabbard is made of wood wrapped in chiseled leather with Renaissance ornamentation related to the Medusa theme. The interior of the pod is lined in fabric. Total length of the sword 94 centimeters Blade length: 75 centimeters Blade width at base: 6 centimeters Balance point: 9 cm from the cross Percussion node: 45 centimeters from the cross Weight: 1,100 grams I hope you like it, best regards
    16 points
  10. Hello! I apologize profusely for the novel that is about to come, I promise I won't be offended if you skip to the pictures I recently graduated from Hampshire College in Massachusetts. Instead of Freshman, Sophomore, etc, students are divided into Division I, II, and III. The first year you take a broad set of unrelated classes, and throughout your middle two years you hone in on something interesting you want to study. Your last year, Division III, is spent working on a thesis project that should be the culmination of the last three years of work and study, producing something wholly new, wether it is a long paper, an experiment, a novel, a play, etc. I have spent the last few years at Hampshire exploring bladesmithing, history, mythology, material culture, and how it all intersects now-a-days. When I arrived there I had never put hammer to anvil, but with some guidance from Elias Sideris and Don Dupuis, I began down the Way. Eli’s work was influenced by the Norse aesthetic, drawing from historical sources as well as wellsprings of artistic inspiration both new and old. I began researching, reading, and looking, and through other artists, like Jake Powning and Petr Florianek, I began to fall in love with that style of work. The seax and the sword captivated me and I began working to unravel their secrets and learn the proportions and geometries that make them be. I began to study Old Norse and the Icelandic Sagas and eventually became enchanted with the poem Beowulf. I first read it in high school and while I enjoyed it, I didn’t know anything about the poem below the surface. I began studying with Professor Craig Davis at Smith College who is a wonderful Beowulf scholar and knows the poem and its intricacies forward and backwards. He agreed to take me on in an independent study examining the use of weaponry in the poem. I began by isolating the four swords featured in the poem, and was later happy to see two of them brought to life by our own forumites and the crew of Arctic Fire 2016 when Dave Stephens created Hrunting, the ancestral and possibly fratricidal blade belonging to Unferth and lent to Beowulf for his fight against the mother. Then there is the Giant’s sword, brought to life by the fateful team of Jake Powning and Owen Bush, forged larger than life and more intricately than could have been imagined previously as a sword only a hero could have wielded. The Third sword is that of Wiglaf, which Dave DelaGardelle is conjuring into existence in his smithy with some steel that I forged for him. (this has been a call out Dave :)) Last but not least is the sword Nægling, an ancestral blade handed down to Beowulf by King Hygelac his forbearer. This is a kingly blade brought up earlier in the poem but used only in the final struggle against the serpent. This blade is an extension of the aged king, and carries the weight of his agency as king and protector. The blade breaks. Made by the hands of men, this heirloom is snapped when it impacts the serpents skull, too hard for normal steel. This is a beautiful moment in the poem for me. Beowulf is painted as the good guy. He has defeated monsters who wanted to destroy and cause harm to his allies. He selflessly defended the people in harms way and proved himself to be a very boastful but trustworthy and powerful man, capable of great deeds. This righteousness ends here. For all of his good intent and earthly power, the serpent IS death. Wyrd comes for all men, and soon the king too must rest. Having delved deeper into this poem I decided a year and a half ago that I would create this kingly sword as it was before it met fate. I had learned the art of hearth melting from Ilya Alekseyev, Mark Green, Zeb, Deming, and Matt Venier among others. I chose to create steel by the light of the full moon every month for a year, and that was the steel I would use to craft this blade. I created low and high carbon material from wrought iron nails, old projects, failed experiments, artifacts, pieces given to my by friends, iron and steel made by great smiths, like Ric Furrer and Jeff Pringle. I ran a melt at Ashokan, and with the help of some of my closest friends, and some wonderful new ones, I made a special piece of material that forged from a 6 pound lump into a 4 foot long bar with only a single crack in it. I helped run a summer class and taught 10 high schoolers how to run a hearth (or three) and make steel. I made material with friends and teachers and the process became as important as the result. At the end of these 12 months though I had come to the end of the easy part, and now I had to actually make the blade. The most important question was what would the blade look like? clearly it needed to be beautiful, as a kings sword would have been. It needed to symbolize the story, like the hilt of the Giant’s sword tells the story of the flood and the demise of the giants, this sword would tell the story of Beowulf and his demise. Enter in the sword from Vehmaa. Featured in the end of Pierces book, Swords of the Viking Age, almost as an afterthought, this blade captivated me since I first bought the book months after starting down this path. This incredible blade features different patterns on each side of the blade as well as an overlaid serpent in the top third of one side. The blade is broken in the top third, separating the serpent. This immediately jumped out to me as being a sword Beowulf could have carried, and the broken serpent was almost too perfect a parallel. Only one smith has been foolhardy brave enough to attempt this blade, and it's none other than my great friend Jesus Hernandez. His incredible creation, and still my favorite sword on this planet can be seen here: With his incredible example out in front I had to try and give it my best! I forged the blade, running into minor issues here and there. The blade itself I consider to be a failure, and is a practice piece for next time. the largest thing I had forged from my own steel was a small seax for Matthew Berry who graciously agreed to do a rush job on making a hilt for this crazy project of mine. I had made much of the steel I used for the sword at Matt’s house over the last year and it was fitting to combine our skills to make a sword worthy of the legendary king. So without further ado, I give you Beowulf’s sword! Just kidding WIP first! This is a small bit of the material I had made and started to refine for this undertaking. The iron and steel pieces were refined differently with an eye for what would go where in the blade. I had close to 60 pounds of material refined for the blade when I was done prep, just to be on the safe side! The billets finished and ready for welding, The leftmost is the edge wrap and the other two are the two sorts of patterned bars found in the sword. I forge welded the serpent bar overtop of the twists on one side of the blade before welding the two sides together. I apologize I don't have many photos of this all as it was a frantic and busy couple of days. The two core pieces next to each other. The original sword had an iron core, but I chose to forgo the added complication. Here the edge is wrapped and welded. It was much harder with home made material than it ever has been for me in modern steel. I'm not sure wether that was due to different expectations in workability or what. The tip weld was nearly the breaking point when I thought I had failed. Some of the pattern peeking through in the scale as I forged the fuller. The original had an iron inlay which was hard to make out. Mikko Moilanen was incredibly generous with his research and has some information on this piece in his dissertation. Skip forward a few crazy minutes and you get to the final moment. The blade was quenched in water and survived! The moon steel sword had hardened nicely. During grinding the blades edges sparked similarly to 1095 or w2 which was a huge surprise as I had never made home made steel that nice before. All of you here know the arduous process that is hand polishing. I wish I had ground it perfectly to 400 grit and polished 320 400 and then 600 and called it a day, but I don't use jigs or fixtures or whatever so I relied on free handing the rest of the geometries. This is scary and also not fun. I ground the blade near sharp at 36 grit and left it there, and polished by hand the rest of the way. This was awful, but worth it, because when I was done and left the blade in the ferric I saw something that made the years work worth it. I had finished the blade but any good blade needs a handle! I contacted my friend Matt and asked if he would be willing to make the fittings for the blade. He agreed and I sent him a photo that was included in a huge set of files from the National Museum of Sweden that he had previously sent me. The museum took wonderful photos of the sword from Vallstenarum. This was the hilt I wanted for my sword and so Matt created beautiful waxes based exactly on the original. The hilt is from a burial in Gotland and features a fabricated and rather botched ring assembly that was certainly not original to the sword. Matt began carving and in an unimaginably small amount of time was able to craft all of the parts needed for the sword and cast them. I went over to his house and we began fitting, drilling, filing, polishing, and assembling all of the parts. We did a huge amount of work and then I took most of the grip home to create the wooden components while Matt finished the pommel assembly. I carved the wooden grip and when I came back a few days later, we spent an afternoon finishing the sword. I had crafted a makeshift sheath which turned out to be hugely helpful in letting us hold the sword for finishing I brought the sword home and began finishing the sheath and the small details so that it would be ready for my gallery show. I forgot to mention I also put together a gallery show for my thesis! That was a lot of work. I had a small space that I filled with several swords and photos on the walls, and cases full of work and some artifacts. I'm sure you guys will recognize some of the pieces! I had to do a loooooot of borrowing to have enough to show I had a case full of some kitchen knives and miscellaneous pieces as well as a belt made with Matt's castings and some artifacts and the pieces they inspired. The center piece! A bit of a story board. A hammer made by Ilya, the one I use for everything along with some parts of the process. Admiring the work! The turn out for the show was far greater than I had anticipated, and it was a huge amount of fun to see so many familiar faces all in the same place. Thank you to everyone here who has inspired me to undertake this journeying to the people who made it possible, both with help researching and experimenting and with distractions or encouragement. Now my hands are starting to itch again, time to get busy!
    16 points
  11. Hello, i finished my friction folder with wolf´s tooth pattern edge. The blade is made of wrought and K720. I used bronze disc for a "stopping" part of the blade which is decorated with silver inlay. The handle is made of antler. The knife is great companion for light travelers for preparing their snacks and their battle against hunger. Probably it is some gift from rohirrim for their hobbit friends I hope you like it
    15 points
  12. This is the other knife I got out of the damascus San Mai billet. My forging was considerably better on this one, but the bevel grinding less so. It's got a 4" blade and a 4 1/2" handle. The handle is brass, desert ironwood, and deer antler. It has the one and only gut hook I hope to ever make, and it is functional only thanks to the gentleman on this forum. This is one of those projects that I am happy to see done. However, critiques are still more than welcomed.
    15 points
  13. I made this about 8 years ago, inspired by the Coleridge poem, but never got it finished 'til now, after someone wanted to buy it. let me know what you think...
    15 points
  14. Hi everyone, I just finished a tanto I had been working on for the last 3 weeks . The blade is W2, uchi-sori with a 7 1/2" nagasa, and the fittings are copper with shibuichi inlays. Here are the photos of the build: Profiling: Hardening: Polished: Now for the part that's really time consuming, the fittings: For this blade, I decided on a ginkgo leaf theme, a symbol of peace: (I forgot to take pictures while making the tsuba and the kashira) To balance the theme, I decided to go with two small war arrows for the menuki. This will be an "I'm peaceful just don't mess with me" tanto. Handle carving: All the pieces are done (minus patina): Rokusho bath: And finally, the finished tanto: Cheers!
    15 points
  15. Howdy.. Well it has been an interesting last bit...took a bit of maneuvering , wheeling/dealing and being creative to stay afloat with minimal (if any) studio time but now that things have turned around and orders are once again coming in..I am BACK!! I did get some serious writing done on book IV as well as figure out how to get a bigger chuck of that wavy feather pattern I have been worklng on..here is the reult of one blade for the cover photo of book IV.. I am keeping this one for myself. 31" blade, double fullers, file worked spine..(wore out 3 files doing it..this steel is tough on files..that or the quality of files has taken a nose dive....) welded from 1095/meteoric iron mix and 1070..great contrast.. I am calling it the "Quetzalcoatl" pattern... hilted with steel fittings and copal grip panels...Using copal was a very unique adventure I will say that... boy that stuff had to get HOT to melt..smelled great though... All in all turned out OK if you ask me.. So..... I'M BACK!! JPH (now the real work starts..getting back into the swing as they say..)
    15 points
  16. Hello! this is The Moon's Daughter, a type XVIII b sword that we started in the May Sword Reflections class of Tannery Pond with Zack Jonas and Peter Jonnhson. finally we finished it. is a pattern welded sword. (1095/1070) the thickness at the cross is 6 mm and the width is 47 mm. The length of the blade is 94 cm and it is 118 in total length. is built following the guidelines dictated by Peter J for the class, many thanks to PJ, ZJ and the classmates for such beautiful days
    15 points
  17. finished riveting up basket hilt attempt number three. Finally got one I'm pretty happy with. my original plan was to braze it after riveting, but honestly the risk/reward doesn't seem worth it...
    14 points
  18. Hi All Finally something worth showing here. I really enjoyed making this Bowie. Pattern welded blade, 1095, 1075 and 15N20 Deer antler handle, oxidized Sterling Silver fittings Guard Iron/Nickel deeply etched. Total length 43 cm, Blade 28.5 cm
    14 points
  19. This one of my more interesting (at least to me) recent projects. It's a gift for someone who was born and raised on a farm in (then) Czechoslovakia in the first half of the 20th century which got me into learning about some of the knife styles from the area throughout history. I settled on the Pastiersky Nož (shepherd's knife), which in silhouette looks pretty standard but is adorned with ornate tin alloy decorations. I had previously seen these on knives from Siberia and Finland but didn't quite get how they were made. Luckily, I personally know a number of native Slovak (an by extension more or less Czech) speakers. With this luxury I haven't had for a lot of other knife styles, I was able to find a few tutorials on how to do this. Here is my basic process: First the handle (walnut) is shaped 90% of the way to the final form. I used a saw and narrow chisel to carve in the grooves for the tin. Here is the bar of alloy I used, "Alloy R92" which is a lead-free tin/antimony pewter. For perspective on how soft this stuff is, I made this cut with a hammer and chisel cold. Next I wrapped the handle in masking tape with a "reservoir" on top, melted the tin, and poured it in. The second photo shows the handle after removing the excess tin. And here it is finished! It could be a bit cleaner and much more intricate, but I'm pretty happy with it for a first pass. Thanks for looking!
    14 points
  20. I have been working on the idea of this for a while...patternwelded inlay(ish) ...this is patternweld with sterling silver spacers and inlay/
    14 points
  21. This is lhe latest colaberation knife made by myself and Petr Florianek. Inspired by saxon swords the 11" blade and handle are made by me and the carving and Sterling silver handle ornamentation is by Petr. going for the bling bling! Hope you like it.
    14 points
  22. Forging the Blade The raw material for this blade spent most of the last century on a former homestead. A large portion of the steel was used for another blade, this was the piece cut from half of the left side. Slowly drying the clay for yaki-ire over the embers in the charcoal forge. After yaki-ire, an #80 grit Sun Tiger stone reveals the approximate hamon as the geometry is set. Habaki Habaki forged to shape in preparation for silver soldering in the charcoal forge. The habaki is textured with files and patinated using a blend of copper salts similar to rokusho. Ireko Saya A two part black buffalo horn (ura) and blond cow horn (omote) lock keeps the two halves aligned when joined. The omote half contains the edge entirely and has an oil collecting reservoir at the tip. The ura half does not contain the edge, keeping it entirely in the omote half. Kataki Tsuka & Saya The hardwood block is split and carved out to fit the ireko saya and the tang and then rejoined using sokui (rice paste glue). This wood is very hard on tools and they require frequent sharpening. Nori-urushi, a mixture of natural urushi lacquer and sokui is used to reinforce certain areas, particularly the koiguchi where the wood is thinner. Mixing the urushi and sokui along with a bit of extra water to help it cure inside the joint. It can take at least a month to fully cure nori-urushi inside a wood joint, more time is better for strength. After the nori-urushi is fully cured the tsuka and saya are shaped with kanna and smoothed with fine rasps and the horn mekugi peg is fitted. An antler crown and tip are used to form a very organic kurikata (栗形, a cord loop) and obidome (帯留, “belt stop”), usually called kaerizuno (返角, “turn-back horn”). The antler kurikata is fit to the saya using a carved sliding dovetail, with no room to spare! The kurikata slides in from one side and then tightens as it reaches the final position. The obidome has a tenon that fits into a mortise carved in the saya, again carved right to the ireko saya. The obidome/kaerizuno will be attached with sokui after the saya is lacquered. In preparation for lacquering, the open grain is cleared of dust using a stiff brush. Ready for fukiurushi, the thin layer of wiped on urushi will preserve the interesting surface texture of the wood. After the lacquer has cured the surface has become a rich, glossy dark chocolate colour. Polishing Once all the parts are made and fitted the blade can be taken through the final polishing stages using Japanese waterstones. The natural #700 used to remove the last of the arato/kongo-do stone scratches. Several stones later, hazuya and jizuya fingerstones made from flakes of uchigumori-do and narutaki-do koppa attached to washi paper with natural urushi are used to even the surface and add depth. This stage is very time consuming as is the uchigumori-do before it. The fine surface grain of the steel brought out by the uchigumori stone throws multiple colours in sunlight. Final Assembly A look at all the koshirae parts before assembly Antler kurikata and obidome attached using sokui and tapped into place with a small mallet. Inserting the ireko saya into the koshirae. Completed aikuchi koshirae. Furusato tanto forged from reclaimed antique steel. View of the spine with peaked iori mune. Macro detail of the interesting texture of the Tshikalakala wood pores.
    14 points
  23. And here is the result. I'm pretty happy with it, taking into account that this is a learning piece. I've learned a lot, both about the original seax and the techniques learned to make the reproduction. Things I would change for the next one: correct the section profile, and change the cross hatched engravings near the hilt on the left side of the blade. That looks out of place. I'd als skive the edges of the leather even thinner. It was now about 0.2mm. And maybe try dyeing the leather with a natural dye. I'd also use a sandwich construction next time, with shear steel edge between wrought. Not sure if that's the original, but seems more likely. Also since the layering appears to be through the thickness, due to parts of the original having been delaminated like that. Now to make the sheath, and then on to an improved version (some day)
    13 points
  24. Finally got it done. It's been quite the challenge to dry fit each part independently, especially since the bolster tapers in thickness too, but it kept me busy during quarantine too
    13 points
  25. 1080/15N20 forged by maker, eyed crushed W's with stainless fittings and a Walrus handle.
    13 points
  26. I've been working on a pipe tomahawk head and finished up the filing on Sunday. After taking the last few strokes with a 3" needle file, and seeing the 16" mill bastard next to it, I thought it would be of interest to some to see the results of drawfiling the way I do, the end result, and every single file I used on the project. First, drawfiling. For hawk heads, there's really not a good way to finish them totally on the grinder because of all the odd curves and stepped lines. Well, maybe if I had a small wheel attachment, but not as I am currently set up. I forge to shape, remove the scale and rough profile with an angle grinder, then use the belt grinder to rough in the surfaces, although it's not strictly necessary. Once the scale is gone you can jump straight to filing, I made hawks that way for eight years before I got the belt grinder. Once I have it as flat as it's gonna be on the belt grinder (36, 60, and 80 grit zirconia followed by A300, A160, A65, and A45 trizact), it's time to drawfile. I start with the 16" mill bastard, which immediately shows where the belt grinder did not make it truly flat. Then to the 12" mill bastard, then on to the six-inchers. Mill bastard, Mill 2nd cut, then mill smooth. After the last strokes with the 6" mill smooth, it's ready for 220-grit paper. I originally took this picture to show the carbon migration from the 1084 edge steel to the wrought iron body, but then I realized I had never posted a picture of a properly drawfiled surface. There are still a couple of 36-grit scratches on the edge steel, but that will be ground away after heat treat. Yes, this is not yet hardened. Also, I should mention if you don't have a belt grinder you can do the entire thing with files. Just takes a little longer. Next, here is the result of all the filing, both draw and push. See what I mean about things you can't do with a belt grinder? Every last bit of surface you see is the result of filing. There was a lathe involved in creating the bowl, but files were used on the bowl while it was in the lathe chuck as well. Note this is as-filed, it has not been sandpapered yet. Well, the molding between eye and blade has been cleaned up with a 1/2" sanding drum for a Dremel, but that's it. Finally, the files used in making this hawk: From the left, we have the 16" mill bastard with one edge ground safe (heavy stock removal and rapid drawfileing), the 1/4" chainsaw (setting some of the curves on the lathe), a 14" long-angle lathe file (fast stock removal push-filing, tends to leave a smoother surface than the 16" mill) 12" round file (lathe work), 12" mill bastard for intermediate smoothing, 8" half-round for setting the transition from eye to blade and shaping that little step on the bottom, the three six-inch mill files (bastard with safe edge, 2nd cut, and smooth), two 6" three-squares, one slim and one XX-slim with a safe edge (these were used to make the grooves and clean up the inside corners on the bowl), and finally, the 3" round needle file that was used to clean up the grooves. The 16" is the workhorse of the family. Used as a push file it cut the shoulders on the transition and the V on the eye. As a draw file it flattened and blended the blade. The long-angle lathe file has two safe edges (meant to be used on the lathe, it won't mar the chuck). The round file and big chainsaw file clean up my sloppy lathework on the neck of the bowl. The other bastard files are just used to clean up after the one before. The three-square XX-slim with one face ground smooth can cut dovetails, but it also acts like a knife to cut very sharp straight lines for the grooves. The slim three-square follows those lines to widen and deepen the cut, and the needle file removes the coarser marks of the bigger files. And that's only about a quarter of my file collection...
    13 points
  27. It's been what, 3.5 years since I first posted here, working with a file jig? And now I'm being published in Blade. This is crazy... And mostly because of this forum. The knife pictured was supposed to be in the KITH and I couldn't finish it in time. Thanks to everyone here who took the time to answer my questions with patience and respect.
    13 points
  28. I'm still alive... and still hammering them out. Although, more so for pleasure than for business these days. Much more enjoyable that way for me! Here's a little hunter that I finished up that's going to a good home. Another knife which I wish I could have kept. Thanks for looking folks and hope all are doing well.
    13 points
  29. Finished this knife after 3 years ....forged the blade in 2018. Steel is 15n20, UHB 20 and a slice of O2 ....edge is 1.2419. Handle is G10, Micarta and amboina.
    13 points
  30. 1080 / 15n20 Damascus by maker with Turkish Walnut handle and stainless fittings .
    13 points
  31. hi everyone! Alright, so I'm spending somewhat of an eternity working on the sheath of this thing - so I've decided to post at least half of the thing... the knife itself. Let me present - Draumr Gripnir - the "Dream Grip" - with some unintended fingermarks and all! Blade in two bars of folded and twisted railroad steel, with a third bar (edge) of 15n20 and ferrier's rasps. Handle i copper, brass, camel bone and vulcanized fiber. The runes engraved in the brass reads "keep your blade sharp, but your mind sharper". The nut on the end really tested my skills as an aspiring "jewler". Anyhow - sheath and complete measurements to come. Needless to say, this is one heavy knife due to the massive materials in the handle. Sincerely, Alveprins.
    13 points
  32. Blade: 1080 & 15N20 Handle: cocobolo Fittings: 416
    13 points
  33. All: It's been about two years since the death of my father. He died unexpectedly and suddenly. Him and I were working on our jointly owned boat in Cordova, Ak and he got a stomach ache. A few days later he was diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic Cancer. Ten days later he died. We had a few days to say goodbye. The very last beer I shared with my Dad was sitting on the flying bridge of his Boat in what was going to be his retirement home in Florida. I asked him what he wanted done at his funeral. In my Dad's characteristic humor he said he wanted me to build a Viking ship and put him on it, pushing it out to sea. i laughed and said that I'd probably go to jail for that. Then we hatched this plan. My family are commercial fishermen from Cordova, Alaska. We lived on the water. My dad always hoped he was of Viking descent. He was intensely disappointed to find out we were not when DNA tests became available. I wanted to share these pics and the video with you guys (my brothers in craftsmanship), but it was too close to the event. It was too personal. Enough time has passed, and I think it's okay to show you what we did. I say "we," because this build was like a long goodbye to my Dad. He was the woodworker. I was the metal guy. I had never built anything more complex than a small cabin out of wood. I had a lot of long conversations with him during this build. Most of them were in the form of: "I know, Dad! But we don't have time to redo that bit. Your funeral is in like seven days!" My buddy Shane Harvey designed this scale model of a Viking Longship from blueprints obtained from the Copenhagen museum in Denmark in CAD and then cut the keel and ribs on his CNC plywood cutter. He also did the dragon head and the small shields with my Dad's initials (RS) on them. The cutting of the cedar planks (each one cut on a table saw by me), the glue up, etc. took almost 20 days of intense work. I totally underestimated the amount of time it would take. All the lessons I had to learn as I went . . . Just in time I had it stained, varnished, and loaded onto my truck for the ferry ride to Cordova. We loaded the boat up with things my Dad loved. Including the very first sword I ever made when I was 12 with his help (ground from a long file), his favorite hat, a jar of peanut butter (his favorite food), and a gin and tonic in a viking horn (not traditional, but it was his drink). And then we set it on fire. It burned until it swamped, and then we sunk it in a bay that he loved. Anyway, hope you like the build. It's not a blade, but I know you guys well enough to know you'll be okay with this off topic post. Cheers, Dave PS: Drone footage by Shane Harvey.
    13 points
  34. Taking a pause on the Norwich saber to get the carving form ready for this piece. It will be a falcata with a tiger theme… so we’ll see where that ends up. Forged this blade almost 20 years ago!
    12 points
  35. Hello, i would like to show you my last work. Blade is made from wrought iron, mild steel and my favourite K720 and the handle materials are bronze and subfosil oak. Ihope you like it and i will post its "brother" very soon .
    12 points
  36. Yesterday was long but rewarding Finished filing the ball of the chape Then a few hours of final sanding and sharpening the blade. It was getting late but realized just how little there was left so decided to keep going and peened the guard onto the blade I have never liked the idea of using the compression from the grip and pommel to hold everything tight as wood is natural and soft. Oh and my vise in a vise setup to hold the blade Peening Then low tech stropping setup that actually works great for long blades And assembled! And got unusually dry and cloudy weather today to get petter pictures of it. That doesn't improve my photography though it ended up 60 grams heavier than the original and a centimeter longer but I am still overall quite happy with it
    12 points
  37. Hey everyone! I want to acknowledge right away that what I'm doing here is questionable and very much non-traditional. In truth, I'm not quite ready for the challenge of a traditional blade made in a traditional way, but I hope to get there someday. This project aims at taking what I learned from a wakizashi I made last year and attempting to 1) not make the same mistakes again (only new ones are allowed!), 2) improve on the technique I've been learning and developing for this particular style of blade, while 3) also aiming for a greater challenge. This katana's construction will be similar, with a twisted wrought iron cladding, because I ultimately want those blades to be a pair. I began with a billet made of 7 layers of wrought iron (1/2" each) and 8 layers of O1 (1/8" each), for a total of 3" by 1.5" by 4.5". This will eventually be used for the outer layers of a san mai. I welded these, then drew the billet out to about 30" by 3/4" square, before hacking it in two and twisting each half (CW/CCW), then flattening them to about 16" by 1/2" by 1". I surface ground one side of each and started working on a second billet for the blade's core. This one will have one central layer of 1095 (7" by 2" by 3/8") for the edge, surrounded by two layers of 15n20 (7” by 2” by 1/4” each). I welded the billet and drew it out to the same width and approximately the same length as the cladding billets, then ground both sides and prepared for the final weld. This resulted in a 26" by 1" by 3/4" bar stock: At this point, and if my math was correct, I still had a *lot* of extra material. Since I wanted to make sure that my core was centered before continuing, I ground one side of the billet and etched it. Everything looked good. To help with my future profiling, I ground two 45-degree angles (see photo below), which I will flatten in the next forging step. Doing so will slightly upset the core on the side that will become the edge, giving it a better chance to line up with the final grind over the blade's entire length. My goal here was to lower the chances that any of the 15n20 would end up dipping into the edge in the final etch. Although that steel will harden too, it is only meant as a cosmetic/contrasting layer to separate the core from the cladding, and perhaps in a misguided way, to take the visual role of a traditional hamon. I don’t want it on the edge. I squared the billet and drew it out to the target width and height of my pre-sunobe stock: 1" by 3/8". This totaled 32", quite a bit more than I needed. To guide the forging of my sunobe, I drew much inspiration from a video from “Old Pueblo Forge”. In the past, for tanto and wakizashi-sized blades, I have pretty much winged this stage. This is the largest billet I have ever dealt with, so I felt I needed a little more care. I measured increasingly shorter sections, each of which will be of equal length once the sunobe is forged. The marks are fairly shallow (made with about 4 short strokes of the corner of a hand file) and will completely disappear as I forge each section to the same length, and to its respective target thicknesses. Ultimately, this ended up removing all of the guesswork, and the lack of fumbling around trying to get the shape right probably saved the centering of my core. I was glad I took the time to think this through. The near and far sections in the above photo are extra material. Despite the (massive amount of) forge scales, the several end-welds that were generously cut off, and the egregious grinding on the edge side, I still had about 8" extra on my final bar stock (now 24" by 1" by 3/8"). I’ll definitely adjust my quantities when I do this again, but for now, this feels very satisfactory. And this is my sunobe, on a dry wooden root, because “art”: At this point, the nagasa is 24.5". I’m aiming for a final 26.5" nagasa and 9" nakago (this will be on the short end of the range for a katana, but it is meant to be appropriate for me, I'm also on the shorter end ) I cut the tip at an angle, using the bandsaw to keep the layers alone. I of course could not resist looking at the end grain. You can see the slight edge upset at the top: The blade cross-section isn’t quite right in this diagram since I hadn’t yet beveled the blade, but that gives an idea of where this is going. I’ll be leaving the edge quite thick (a good 4mm, or 5/32") to preserve some of the core thickness that the edge upset gave me. On the other hand, I’ll be aiming to be close to the final thickness on the spine: I want each side of the blade to cross as much of the centerlines of the cladding as possible for maximum pattern activity. Those will be things to keep in mind at profiling time. Obviously, the twists aren’t laid out symmetrically. I’m OK with that. If previous similar blades are any indication, my beveling will introduce plenty of randomness in the final pattern anyway. I’m definitely not aiming for a perfectly symmetrically clad blade. Last forging steps. I “flipped the tip“ and started forging the bevels. This will be a hira zukuri blade, so beveling was a fairly simple process, just more of it than I had done before in one go. Here's a photo as I was getting started (the final tip ended up thinner than this, as I thought this was a bit too “bulky” for hira zukuri). And this is the beveled blade, after an overnight bath in vinegar: After a rough cleanup: And after a dirty etch to check my san mai geometry: I was really pleased because this showed that the core was still centered enough that I didn’t need to take any drastic measures. Success! (so far...) It was time for profiling: And finally, heat-treating. The temperatures I'm using are focused on the 1095 steel that’s on the edge (as opposed to the 15n20 and O1, which are cosmetic). I did a normalization at 1575F and used the heat to pre-curve the blade since I’m going to quench in oil. I did 3 descending heats/stress relief cycles after that, then quenched at 1475F, with little to no soaking time (just enough to make sure the oven temperature had stabilized). Going in! What went well: 1) no flashing (8x40 tank of parks 50 at ambient temp) and 2) the blade had pretty much zero warpage, only a minimal amount on the tang, which was fixed in seconds. My past experience dealing with this kind of wrought iron san mai construction made me expect a potentially severe warp. None of that happened, and I was very pleased. What went badly: this is me realizing I had just lost most of the pre-curve to the oil quench (look at my eyebrows, they're saying "wait, wha?"): There’s a thread about that in the “Metallurgy and other enigmas” board. Long story short, I was misinformed, and though no clay would mean no sori from the oil quench, negative or otherwise. I wasn’t sure where to go from here, and I kept mulling over this... I took the time to clean up the blade and do a quick etch before finally deciding that I was not fond of the Kanbun era style. Don’t get me wrong, it certainly has its charm, but I wanted this katana’s lines to be somewhat in harmony with the wakizashi it is meant to be paired with, and that ain’t it. So I went back to HT square 1, reset the pre-curve, giving it enough to compensate for the prior loss as well as the next. I re-normalized, relieved the stress again, and quenched a second time. I was much happier with the result. This is after a quick cleanup and a few corrections to the profile on the tang and the tip: Given that I didn’t differentially harden the blade, I didn’t want the edge screaming hard, so I aimed for 57-58HRC with two 2h 550F tempering cycles (begging the question as to why I am using 1095...). My understanding is that this may still be a bit high for a non-DH blade, but the shallow hardening of 1095 combined with the still fairly thick iron jacket might actually have allowed me to keep the edge harder. I lack experience here, I’m afraid (please do set me straight!). I’ve done some more cleanup of the profile since then, on the tip, spine, edge, and nakago, to help the lines flow a little better. I still have a couple of spots of decarb left here and there, a little bit of thinning of the tip to do, and I’ll eventually file-finish and engrave the nakago before doing the final etch. So there’s still quite a bit of work to do, but the blade is pretty much at final shape and dimension: nagasa: 66.1cm (26"), sori: 1.5cm, moto-kasane: 0.7cm, saki-kasane: 0.49cm, motohaba: 3.1cm, sakihaba: 2.1cm, overall weight: 658g This isn't the final polish and etch, but here’s a sneak peek: Next to its little sister: I'll be starting on the fittings, and I'll update this thread as I make further progress. Cheers!
    12 points
  38. My mother commissioned me to make this one as a gift for her grandson (my nephew). He likes to fish and hunt, and my sister actually picked out a pattern from one I'd made years ago. It has contemporary elements like the ricasso and and etched logo, but I had to incorporate the seven pin bird-head handle to keep a little 18th century vibe going. I forged the blade from 1084. The handles are, as Dr. Jim would say, bovine ivory (cow bone). The pins are 6p finish nails. Leather sheath dyed with iron acetate and hardened with heat and bee's wax. 4.25" blade, 8" overall. I hate that I didn't get a good spine shot. I was extremely pleased with the distal taper in the tang and blade.
    12 points
  39. It’s been a long time since I posted anything this is the latest off my bench FullSizeRender.mov
    12 points
  40. Hi guys, I recently posted a preview of a blade I have been working on, and I have now finally been able to finish the complete knife - sheath not included... thought I'd give a bit of a new preview of the whole thing. All inlay in both handle, bolster and blade are 24 karat gold wire, 0,7mm in thickness. Bolster is in meteorite iron - which is nerve wrecking to work with when doing inlay. Some areas are more fragile than others, and if you look closely at the "R" - you'll see the outline of a chip. A small piece came off - but I was able to glue it back on, and also lock it in place by having the "R" rune loop through it. It sits solid now. But my heart really dropped when it came loose... Have a nice week guys! Sincerely, Alveprins.
    12 points
  41. Hey everyone! Here's a project I'm nearly finished with! I started messing around with some ideas for a small wolf tooth fire striker. This is the prototype, with teeth about the same size as the ring I made a while ago. Made from iron and folded steel. Next one will be in my own home made materials. IMG_0745.MOV Around the time I finished it up I got a mail call! An original wolf tooth spear that I cleaned and etched and sealed. I started to reverse engineer the construction of the spear based on other examples I had seen and the texture of the steel and iron in the original spear. The lines showed me a lot! The spear is constructed around a core that is waisted to accept the twisted bars into it so that when they are welded onto the core the core is already spear shaped, and ready to accept the edges. I forged an iron core and cleaned the edges with the grinder. While I was forging that, I took some iron of different types and made a 7 layer billet, which I forge welded and drew out into 1/4 inch bars. I twisted them in different directions (although the original spear has the twists in the same direction) and then tapered the ends to fit into the core. I forge welded it all together and gently refined the shape and taper of the spear. At this point I realized I was oversized by a bit, instead of 11 inches overall my spear ended up being 13 inches overall. Next time I will make the core a little more delicate and it should come out to a better size. The two bars on the top are very soft iron and some refined bloom steel for the edge. I'd wager the steel is likely around .4-.5% carbon, and reached about 57 RC after hardening. Since there is so little steel on the spear it's quite ductile. Then below is the core and the socket preform. I started making the teeth in the bar, which was the most time consuming part of this whole process I think, though I suppose the folding of the steel took longer! I used different tooling to squish the iron into the teeth of the edge, and I should have really just waited till the press was back. I had the iron fill partially and leave pin pricks on the final piece which is a shame. I didn't get any photos of the socket welding and the final shaping of the piece, but here it is after hardening. Next to the original I chose to shape my spear a little different as I was already oversized and had decided to change the direction of the twists, so I figured it was 'inspired by' instead of a direct recreation. The teeth are basically every .5cm And then an hour of polishing! I brought it to 600 grit and etched in 4:1 ferric mix for about five minutes and cleaned it off with rotten stone after neutralizing. And some video! Hope you guys enjoy the spear! Next is hafting it, likely a 6 foot Ash pole? IMG_0957.mov IMG_0952.mov
    12 points
  42. This one was ordered by a friend's mother as a 40th birthday present for him. He's an ex recce sniper and a wilderness guide, so I inlayed some spent .308 brass in the handle (I wanted to use .337, but I don't shoot long guns, and could only buy them by the 100, which would have cost about as much as the knife. But .308 is the classic British Military sniper round, and Highland stalking round, so it's all good...) and used .22 and .22 magnum for the lanyard hole liner. 1095 blade, clay hardened with fileworked tang. Red deer antler scales, with copper pins. The lanyard is made of a fairly still nylon core cord that I quite like for this. Leather pouch sheath. let me know what you think...
    12 points
  43. The blade here was made from six bars of irregular layers of 1080 & 15N20. The two in the center were twisted less(both left & right handed) than the top & bottom pairs, stacked and then welded like a Merovingian or Turkish pattern. I think that it gave it a very distinct and unique pattern. The handle scales are mastodon with fittings of 416 & some diagonally coin edged nickel silver with a guard forged from a bar of A36 & hot blued in 500 degree salts.
    12 points
  44. A friend called me and said he had an anvil for me. I am so very grateful but I do wish it was just a bit bigger!
    12 points
  45. I decided to forge the longest early-medieval spearhead ever found in Poland. Its original find was found in the Lednica lake in 1961. It has a octagonal socket. The blade is pattern-welded (four twist bars on each side). To forge it I used 19 cent. wrought iron and steel. It took 6 full day work days and. I used 120 kg of coke. here you can find complete cataloque of spears from Lednica lake: http://studialednickie.pl/wiadomosci/biblioteka-studiow-lednickich/66096ae1c4bcf6d985f3fd81714fdd9a.pdf
    12 points
  46. WARNING!! There may be just a tiny bit of bragging in this post. My 17yo son just came out to the shop and showed me his SAT scores. 1530 out of 1600! Puts him in the 99th percentile of all SAT takers! After almost losing him several times last year (Teenage depression is no joke. My wife and I both agree that 2020 has been a cakewalk compared to the hell we went through in 2019). To see him apply himself and come through it like this has been amazing. His experiences are driving him to go to school and become a psychiatrist so that he can help people deal with their issues and get their lives back on track. With this kind of SAT score he stands a very good chance of getting accepted to one of the schools he wants to attend (John's Hopkins, UofM, Penn, or Dartmouth). I can't even begin to express how proud I am of what he's accomplished so far!
    12 points
  47. It only took 5-6 years. The blade is a two-core interrupted twist. The handle is sea cow bone, the fittings are about 2lbs of silver with niello inlay, and there are two opals set into the sheath, which is the same from front to back. The stand is black walnut.
    12 points
  48. Here's my latest... a custom order that when I drew options for the client, I labelled "insane" as it was an exercise more than anything in taking lines to an extreme. I was a little taken aback when he chose the drawing to proceed with. It has a 15" blade, is 20-3/4" in overall length, and the blade is 2.25" max width at the harpoon apex. It features a 9 bar pattern-weld blade, in turkish/serpents composite with explosion pattern bars for the clip and dropped edge. Completing the package are a 954 aluminum bronze guard, sculpted grenadilla handle, and 954 bronze nut for the through tang-construction. It is 1 lb. 12.3 oz. in total weight, and balanced to CHOP. Pics and a vid! Thanks for checking it out!
    12 points
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