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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/28/2020 in Posts

  1. I decided to forge the longest early-medieval spearhead ever found in Poland. Its original find was found in the Lednica lake in 1961. It has a hexagonal socket. The blade is pattern-welded (four twist bars on each side). To forge it I used 19 cent. wrought iron and steel. It took 6 full day work days and. I used 120 kg of coke. here you can find complete cataloque of spears from Lednica lake: http://studialednickie.pl/wiadomosci/biblioteka-studiow-lednickich/66096ae1c4bcf6d985f3fd81714fdd9a.pdf
    12 points
  2. Managed to finish this along with some other stuff this weekend! I start with paper templates to get the shape of the shape sorted out. When you bend the paper over, you can use your finger to crease the paper and cut it to shape. The 'staples' are made from pattern wire sheet that I cut and trim, then bend over a form. These get some gentle hammering with a plastic jewelry hammer with some leather or shop towel in between the silver and the hammer. This cinches the staples firmly around the leather. I do them one at a time so I can drill and peen the rivet with
    8 points
  3. This long weekend I managed to get one of the bunch of three folders I'm working on ready to add scales to prior to final assembly. The other two got new blades (one of them twice when the dovetail cutter slipped and broke through the first replacement blade ) and one got a new spring when it turned out the first one didn't want to be tweaked any further. All parts currently cooling down in their respective tempering ovens, the blades in the brick-filled toaster and the spring in the Evenheat. Here's the one that worked from the beginning. I kind of lik
    7 points
  4. I sliced the end off a damascus billet and etched it to see what I had. Then I decided to make this out of the slice. I offered it up on FB to the first person to show me a receipt for a $100 donation to a food bank. In not much more than an hour, someone took me up on it, and he's literally walking distance from the house . With my fat backsmith fingers I made a braided hemp cord for it, and a copper hanger, and I threw in a nice chevron bead. Not too shabby, and it's nice to work on a project with a quick finish. Geoff
    6 points
  5. Just recently finished this one out. Same design as the one I did earlier this year, but with Thuya Burl. Blade - Wagon Wheel Wrought / 80Crv2. Handle - Thuya / SS hardware.
    5 points
  6. 5 points
  7. Thank you Alan! I don't know about wizard, but I may know just about enough to get myself into trouble! Larry, if you want to try something interesting, get a blade ready for hardening, and heat just the edge in the forge. When you have a fairly even heat zone around where you want your hamon to be, quench in oil! (or water if you're feeling dangerous) Like Alan said, cross section and the speed and depth of hardening make a big difference! The heat zone you create can influence quite a nice hamon in steels that are ready to accept this, like W2 or 1095 for instance. This is a W2
    5 points
  8. This is what I worked on the past few days. Not blade related but something for a Christmas present. Made it from 15N20, 1084, and 52100. I twisted it several times, then cut about 7" off to make this cross. Only thing I didn't think about when I started this is that there are 26 separate surfaces to grind, sand, and polish. I ended up not sanding the sides and bottom. That saved me several hours. Sanded it down to 2500 grit and then buffed it. Heat treated it, etched in coffee, then then tempered it at 520° to turn it blue. It measures 4" x 2 5/8", and made to christian cross specifications.
    4 points
  9. My latest Jarn Hond single edged viking sword....Hope you like it. I have been playing with replicating inlay (which i do not have the skill or patients for) with patternweld which I guess I do!
    4 points
  10. A friend ordered a kitchen knife as a Christmas present for his future father-in-law, so I made him this - clay hardened CS70, bubinga and copper, with a bit of filework: let me know what you think...
    4 points
  11. Aim for the top, there's more room there. Quoted this morning by Senator Lamar Alexander.
    4 points
  12. As time goes by things change! however this place still has a large place in my heart and was part of an awakening I will always be gratefull for. It still stands as a rare example of how one should behave and interact on the internet ...with passion , understanding and a leash on the ego.
    4 points
  13. Hey everyone! I'm working on a kind of general Viking woman's knife. I drew inspiration from a bunch of different types of seaxes and knives, and distilled it into what you'll see here! It's maybe not quite a seax, but I don't think it's just a knife either. It's being made for a friend of mine in Iceland who gifted me some really amazing material when I was over there last year. She asked for 'a simple viking woman's knife' and I think I may have missed the mark on the 'simple' part, but it is what it is! I'll attach a bunch of photos like usual and maybe some reference I used fo
    3 points
  14. If you're interested in medieval European knives, you probably know Cowgill et al.'s book on knives from London and the Archaeology of York volumes on early medieval and late medieval knives from Coppergate, York. A little less famous in the English-speaking world is a PhD thesis by Gerhard Folke Wulf Holtmann. It covers 1300 knives from the Netherlands, both Germanies, Poland, the western former USSR, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The typology is a bit opaque (88 categories with names like IIIb1.1 which become 17 Auswertungsgruppen!) and the drawings are not as nice as in Cowgill's book, but i
    3 points
  15. Everybody has to start somewhere, and experimentation is part of the fun! Out of the sources of information you listed, this forum is by far the best. FIF is good for what it is, and there is a lot of talent that has appeared on the show, but the need to make it an entertaining TV show gets in the way of some of the important information so I wouldn't really call it educational. YouTube is great once you figure out which of the content creators to actually listen to, and which ones are repeating misinformation they heard from another creator. Hint: watch the videos folks on her
    3 points
  16. Heated the furnace to a good yellow heat to firm up the chalky nature of the old castable refractory shell. I tossed in a few low carbon pieces of bloom iron and created melt #3 an 800 gram ingot with a lobe of low carbon steel attached to one side. That lobe was removed and the remaining weight of high carbon steel is about 500 grams. Today I processed Oroshigane bloom #4 staying mostly within the guidelines suggested by Emiliano. Just short of 2000 grams ( low carbon bloom ) was put into the furnace and about 1650 grams of high carbon steel was produced. Not included in this weig
    3 points
  17. Still futzing with this one that I've been working on for the past few days as a distraction from the basket hilt that's breaking me (hopefully more on that front soon...). 1095 blade, hammered copper habaki, brass seppas, bog oak fuchi and kashira, stained and lacquered poplar burl tsuka, buffalo horn mekugi, stained elm saya sealed with shellac. Still got to play with the polish a bit and maybe make some menuki. And I still need to buy a new camera, but my car's in the shop, and it'll be another week before I find out how poor I am... let me know what yo
    3 points
  18. Hey everyone. I tried my first hamon 2 days ago. I used Rutland refractory cement and .041 wire. It looked like the hamon half took after many hours of sanding. Like a dummy I decided I wanted to try to quench again to get a full hamon. What I didnt pay attention to was how lean the edge was after all that sanding. Again, like a dummy I decided to water quench it. Im sure you're cringing already. Yes it blew up lol. Ive been working on another blade already and the last picture is how it sits right now. It is currently sanded to 1200 and just got a wiped with lemon juice for about 10
    2 points
  19. Welcome to the madness! and Nice Start! Listen to these guys, they know what they're doing! The only thing I might throw in the mix is to start drawing and DO NOT ERASE ANYTHING. This may help in the template saving department too. But once you start drawing out designs, even if you have no intention to make them all, they start showing you lines and curves you do and don't like, and you'll start getting an eye for how to get the profiles to a place you like. Don't worry about "I can't draw", just sketch whats in your brain cause that's whats gonna come out in your forge.
    2 points
  20. That's fantastic! Well done! You do see spearheads of this length from more periods. There's a 84cm long bronze age spearhead from Belfast, Ireland (top one): http://research.ucc.ie/doi/worsaae/figures/Image03.jpg
    2 points
  21. If they are the run of the mill retail store stainless knives, you would be better off using the steel in the blades to make the canister instead of using it to make a blade. If they are high quality stainless knives you may run into some weldability challenges, but it might be fun to try. Then again, if they are good quality knives, I'd hate to cut them up.
    2 points
  22. Thanks for the Pin! trying to fit this one in around other work in the shop but got a little done when I had my current commission soaking in vinegar to break the scale down. I got the pommel finish ground , the risers added to the grip core and started the hand polishing on the guard. PXL_20201202_210711780.mp4
    2 points
  23. The Viennese bloggers at https://neuesausdergotik.blogspot.com/p/messerertisch.html have a series of posts on their replica knife projects. They concentrate on Austria in the 13th and early 14th century and on the style of knife most associated with that place and time: whittle tang / hidden tang / Griffangel knives with the handle assembled from many discs of different materials (Griffplättchentechnik). If you read German, the knifemaker has a good post on the development of the Griffplättchentechnik which is clearer and more complete on this style of knife than some of the academic studie
    2 points
  24. It's been kind of traditional the last few years to have a thread for all of the completed submissions. Our adjusted and final deadline is Monday the 30th this year. Please add your name to this list so that the lovely Dr. King (Alan's better half) can draw the names! Pics are nice too 1. Brian Dougherty 2. 3.
    2 points
  25. I agree 100% (which is why I don't go through the effort of posting there.) I've wondered if this phenomenon is the cause or the effect of our society that overuses (IMO) superlatives. Everything new, it seems, is "The best!!!"...or "Awesome!!!"...or.... We need to get back to a place where a critique isn't criticism.
    2 points
  26. There is one longer :-) but older (Celtic), 80 cm.
    2 points
  27. Hey all, these blades have been in the works for some time now, but my job has kept me plenty busy. With work slowed down and 4 days off in a row for Thanksgiving, I lit a fire under my ass and got to finishing some projects. Both of these blades are forged from 1084. First, is a mezzaluna that is about 9 in wide and a 1.75" tall. It took a bit of ingenuity to get that much curve in my 3-in diameter forge. Especially with the tangs poking out the way they do. I used some medium sized file handles on it, along with a mustard patina. This one went to a student at a local culinary sch
    2 points
  28. I thought I'd share this email I got regarding this topic: Hi, Thanks for responding. In short, I bumped on "Serbian cleaver/chef's knife?" https://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?/topic/41130-serbian-cleaverchefs-knife/ and since I’m not a member of the forum I decided to contact you directly. I'm from Croatia (ex Yugoslavia same as Serbia) and recently I seen a lot about Serbian cleaver. In beginning I was shocked and thought some local jerk was selling snake oil, but then I realized from other YouTube videos they sell them on AliExpress, so I guess its Chinese jerks
    2 points
  29. OK, I've been tempted to post these for the last few years every time one of y'all start bragging about your fishing prowess. I literally caught these two fish back to back a few years ago. Keep in mind that I live in a region where a body of water over an acre or two is called a lake First a mighty bluegill: Then a massive large mouth on the next cast... Do you have any idea how hard it is to set a hook when it is bigger than the fish
    2 points
  30. Hello all. Here's the first episode of the NWBA's KnifeMaker's Corner:
    2 points
  31. After the hunt is done and the meat processed and bought to the table a good knife is needed to help enjoy the fruits of your endevours. I have been working on a table knife/steak knife design over the last couple of years and now have it where I convinced that it is worthy of presenting to my customer base. There is a His'n'Hers in the pair with the Hers being a fraction shorter in both handle and blade. Blades is NitroV SS with the first pair being spalted buckeye and the second pair with maple burl. These are some of the trial knives I have done and rejec
    2 points
  32. Where I live in Tennessee, our second biggest fish is the Blue Catfish, some catches easily exceed 100 pounds. They are my favorite fish to catch, they are like a bull when they get a hook into them and hug the bottom like crazy. But I still remember the day one snapped my line. I was actually just sitting on a dock fishing for Bluegill, a type of sunfish which averages a couple of pounds for a "good one". I like to catch a fingerling or two and use them for fresh bait. I had my line out and was talking to some kid who had walked up, when my rod twitched. I looked and my line had went under a
    2 points
  33. Finished. Just got to add some leather straps. Thanks for the feedback and advice along the way.
    2 points
  34. This is such a great thread. The first knife is when I started back in 2010: and the second is one that I made I believe four years ago of which I am still very proud. The last knife is one of my most recent but personally most significant.
    2 points
  35. Clamped up and waiting for the epoxy to dry.
    1 point
  36. Went out near home fishing today. The boat ramp is 25 mins from home. Trolled for 3 hours with nothing and the day seemed to be a fizzer. I was on my own and was trolling 2 rods and trying to cast into snags with a third rod. I was getting tangled and snagged until I decided to stop trying everything and make a decision on one thing and stick to it. I put a little lure on and started just casting the to every nook and cranny and started catching fish. Just another case of less is more. Ended up with 1 Barramundi, 1 Mangrove Jack, 2 pikey bream and ab
    1 point
  37. Personally I would skip the stainless, even if you can get it to weld in the can most stainless is much harder to forge (as in it doesn't want to move under the hammer) than carbon steels, and chances are you will pull your billet apart by forging it to shape.
    1 point
  38. I make mostly stick tangs. One of the things I like about them is the ability to work on the handle and the fit before assembly. I think there is a WIP of that in the pinned topics. Wow, this is from 2008! Nearly all of us have to develop an eye for detail, and some times it takes someone with a better eye to point things out. I'm an ABS JS (look that up if the alphabet salad doesn't mean anything to you) and it took the ABS judges to point out a major flaw in my work. I just didn't have the skills to see the problem. These are all pretty good first efforts, but they
    1 point
  39. I've been on a lot of forums over the years as I have a lot of hands-on hobbies. It's actually unusual for me to stay as passionate about a hobby as long as I have with this one, so I understand why people move on. People who do this for a living generally don't have time to "Play" on a forum, so I can see why those people move on as well. The social media shift has bothered me for years. FB and Insta are neat and a better place for revenue, but do not replace a forum like this in my opinion. For me forums are a place to: 1. Learn quickly because of a massive amount
    1 point
  40. Thank you all! I really appreciate it! Hopefully I didn't skip over too much important stuff! Joshua, this one is actually kind of my 'standard' seax shape. To be honest I haven't looked at any historical blade shapes and studied them in a long time, which I suppose I should change! At this point I'm just kind of making the shapes from memory. I just checked it against a seax I have that is supposed to be from ~7th cent France, and the shapes are fairly close, although the antique one has a bit of a sweep in the clip which I quite like.
    1 point
  41. if you put tape on the file it might work better than tape on the workpiece, you can file through tape on the workpiece but if the tape is stuck to the file it wont be cut. its what i do for this kind of thing, but because of the curves on that area your knife i would use a needle file and tape might not stick to a tiny little file. tape on the workpiece will work but be careful as alan said, it only takes one bad stroke to go through the tape. your looks good for a first few tries, ill have to give it a shot someday.
    1 point
  42. Thanks Alan and Billy. I used carnauba wax. I will clean, etch again and try oil. To be clear, I have had several failed attempts that looked like a run over rusty soup can. This time I used stainless hose clamps to hold the bars and more heat less hammer to set the weld.
    1 point
  43. I took a couple of days off work to spend time with Jim Austin in Oakland and take his axe forging class. The objective was to transform the bar of steel into that axe head: This is basically all forging work without really much grinding and or filing afterwards. We made two axes and here is the one I made (under Jim's excellent tutelage): If you are interested, I can also post some photos from all the forging stages.
    1 point
  44. I don't have any help on finding it, but you can mention the shop here. We don't ban people for spam unless they're actually spamming. Good luck! Surely there's an Australian office for Uddeholm-Bohler?
    1 point
  45. If you guys lived closer I would do you up a fish feast and try my hardest to find Gerald a large snake or crocodile. Now I’m getting hungry! There sits the mighty “Silver Catfish” an I be her Captain! A cod I did not get to eat. There is always a bigger fish!
    1 point
  46. I came here after being insulted by the elitist attitudes on IFI that developed after I joined. The respect and courtesy given to all here is the key for it's popularity. May that, and the free flow of knowledge never end here...........................
    1 point
  47. I took my first blacksmithing class 22 years ago this month, October of 1998. Did a lot of ornamental stuff before trying blades. Here's #1 (the little one with sheath) and #3: You can't tell from the pics, but the blade and guard of #1 are welded cable. What am I most proud of? Let's see... there's this repro of the last tomahawk presented to Meriwether Lewis, accurately dimensioned and using antique wrought iron: and the blades of the Maldon Foes collab between me and Petr Florianek (Petr did the handles and scabbards): And my trowel:
    1 point
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