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  1. Hey everyone! I taught a class at the New England School of Metalwork over the last week and thought I would share some images here! I took a ton of photos over the class, but will kind of pair it down to the images of the demo spear I made, and a few shots of all of the spears together. We studied and made three pattern welded billets based on historical patterns seen on various originals. We also drew out a bunch of wrought iron sheet from round stock for the sockets. We also made some really nice edge steel, 480 layers of 15n20 and 1095 The wrought iron sheet with the templates ready for cutting. A few of the twist bars for my spear, 24 twists on the left, and one of the interrupted twists for the other side of the spear. Beginning to square the twist bars to assemble the spear. 5 bars welded into one! I like to do my welding sequences as close together as possible. I laid the twist bars and wrought iron core together, and forge welded the five bars in the same step. A quick, and apparently out of focus, test etch of the side of the spear with the interrupted twists in it. The edge bar has been wrapped around the core and forge welded in place, then drawn out! Test etch on the other side of the spear. Wrought iron socket ready for forge welding. The plan! And the result! Next to the demo I made in preparation for the class. Something kind of interesting! I left my spear thick to account for grinding into the center of my pattern and to avoid drawing it out too long. I am a big fan of complex multibar patterns, and this was a fun exercise in making precise patterns in a different blade shape than what I'm usually doing. The finish ground weight! This was after hardening and tempering of course. And here's the finished piece! Made from 7 separate parts, an iron core, 4 twist bars, a wrapped around edge, and the socket! The twists are 11 layers of 1095 and 15n20 and the edge is 480 layers of the same. It was finished by being put on a 7 foot Ash haft, and its kind of amazing to hold something this alive on a 7 foot pole! We're in the process of figuring out where to display it in the shop now! And a shot of all of the spears finished during the week! All have different patterns and constructions and showcase each students creativity beautifully! I'm super proud of the work these guys did, and will share a shot of all of us together in a bit. I don't think I've ever seen this many newly made spears in one place, and much less of this quality! IMG_4738.MOV
    18 points
  2. Just put this one together - another facebook makers challenge that got out of hand: clay hardened 1095 blade - I haven't measured it but it's about 8", and thin, not much over 1/8th", with a false edge on one side. Wrought iron bolster and mild steel guard, with mild steel and nickel silver spacers. the steel has been oil-blued, and the ns is sculpted and polished. Oil-blued steel pommel plate with carved mammoth ivory panels. Macassar ebony handle carved with high relief knotwork, with steel pins. Scabbard is laminated millboard covered in lambskin, with a forged and polished mild steel chape, with a knurled bog oak bead at the tip, and a turned steel Sam Browne stud mounted on a sculpted NS face plate. This one took way to much time, but it was a lot of fun. Let me know what you think...
    17 points
  3. A few weeks ago a kid (I say kid, college senior doing an honors thesis, probably 21 or so ) came to my local guild meeting to ask if anyone could help him with a sword. His honors thesis involves hand-making everything that appears in a portrait of a Scots nobleman of the mid-18th century. He's already made the shoes and belts, woven the fabric for the hose and jacket, made the hat, and all sorts of other things. Since he also makes flintlock rifles by hand, and as such proved he's no idiot, I agreed to see what he could do with the equipment I have that he needed to help with the sword blade. Eight shop hours over the last two days, and here he is with a completed backsword blade, ground to 120. He did most of the forging and all the grinding except for a couple of tricky bits. 5/16" x 1.3" 1084 starting stock. Forged yesterday, ground and partially drawfiled today. I think he looks kinda proud.
    16 points
  4. Hello, i finished my friction folder with wolf´s tooth pattern edge. The blade is made of wrought and K720. I used bronze disc for a "stopping" part of the blade which is decorated with silver inlay. The handle is made of antler. The knife is great companion for light travelers for preparing their snacks and their battle against hunger. Probably it is some gift from rohirrim for their hobbit friends I hope you like it
    15 points
  5. This is the other knife I got out of the damascus San Mai billet. My forging was considerably better on this one, but the bevel grinding less so. It's got a 4" blade and a 4 1/2" handle. The handle is brass, desert ironwood, and deer antler. It has the one and only gut hook I hope to ever make, and it is functional only thanks to the gentleman on this forum. This is one of those projects that I am happy to see done. However, critiques are still more than welcomed.
    15 points
  6. finished riveting up basket hilt attempt number three. Finally got one I'm pretty happy with. my original plan was to braze it after riveting, but honestly the risk/reward doesn't seem worth it...
    14 points
  7. Hi All Finally something worth showing here. I really enjoyed making this Bowie. Pattern welded blade, 1095, 1075 and 15N20 Deer antler handle, oxidized Sterling Silver fittings Guard Iron/Nickel deeply etched. Total length 43 cm, Blade 28.5 cm
    14 points
  8. This one of my more interesting (at least to me) recent projects. It's a gift for someone who was born and raised on a farm in (then) Czechoslovakia in the first half of the 20th century which got me into learning about some of the knife styles from the area throughout history. I settled on the Pastiersky Nož (shepherd's knife), which in silhouette looks pretty standard but is adorned with ornate tin alloy decorations. I had previously seen these on knives from Siberia and Finland but didn't quite get how they were made. Luckily, I personally know a number of native Slovak (an by extension more or less Czech) speakers. With this luxury I haven't had for a lot of other knife styles, I was able to find a few tutorials on how to do this. Here is my basic process: First the handle (walnut) is shaped 90% of the way to the final form. I used a saw and narrow chisel to carve in the grooves for the tin. Here is the bar of alloy I used, "Alloy R92" which is a lead-free tin/antimony pewter. For perspective on how soft this stuff is, I made this cut with a hammer and chisel cold. Next I wrapped the handle in masking tape with a "reservoir" on top, melted the tin, and poured it in. The second photo shows the handle after removing the excess tin. And here it is finished! It could be a bit cleaner and much more intricate, but I'm pretty happy with it for a first pass. Thanks for looking!
    14 points
  9. And here is the result. I'm pretty happy with it, taking into account that this is a learning piece. I've learned a lot, both about the original seax and the techniques learned to make the reproduction. Things I would change for the next one: correct the section profile, and change the cross hatched engravings near the hilt on the left side of the blade. That looks out of place. I'd als skive the edges of the leather even thinner. It was now about 0.2mm. And maybe try dyeing the leather with a natural dye. I'd also use a sandwich construction next time, with shear steel edge between wrought. Not sure if that's the original, but seems more likely. Also since the layering appears to be through the thickness, due to parts of the original having been delaminated like that. Now to make the sheath, and then on to an improved version (some day)
    13 points
  10. Finally got it done. It's been quite the challenge to dry fit each part independently, especially since the bolster tapers in thickness too, but it kept me busy during quarantine too
    13 points
  11. 1080/15N20 forged by maker, eyed crushed W's with stainless fittings and a Walrus handle.
    13 points
  12. It's been what, 3.5 years since I first posted here, working with a file jig? And now I'm being published in Blade. This is crazy... And mostly because of this forum. The knife pictured was supposed to be in the KITH and I couldn't finish it in time. Thanks to everyone here who took the time to answer my questions with patience and respect.
    13 points
  13. Taking a pause on the Norwich saber to get the carving form ready for this piece. It will be a falcata with a tiger theme… so we’ll see where that ends up. Forged this blade almost 20 years ago!
    12 points
  14. And a Gralloching Dirk. 1075 blade with filework and shallow scraped fullers. Hand carved bog oak handle. Copper ferrule. hand tooled and stitched leather scabbard. let me know what you think...
    12 points
  15. Hello, i would like to show you my last work. Blade is made from wrought iron, mild steel and my favourite K720 and the handle materials are bronze and subfosil oak. Ihope you like it and i will post its "brother" very soon .
    12 points
  16. Hello all, Long time lurker, first time posting! I wanted to share with you the first blade that I forged from some crucible steel. I first found wootz about 8 months ago and instantly fell in love with the watered pattern, I had to make a knife. I watched tons of youtube videos, read research articles until my brain went numb and got lost on sketchy Russian/Ukrainian websites searching for bulat with google translate. In the end I followed pretty closely to what is outlined in the Verhoeven and Pendray research articles about wootz. However, I pulled significant amounts of information from the people of this forum and youtube videos posted by Niels Provos, Richard Furrer, and I know there was at least one more person but I cant think of it atm... Well enough of that, here are some pictures! According to the calculations, should be about 1.5% C. I used powdered mild steel bought online, cast iron from old plumbing pipes and bits of O1 tool steel for Vanadium and Chromium. I know you only need one but I got both . The wootz cake was a little over 2 kg Wootz Cake This is about my 12th wootz cake. All of the others were done with a charcoal fire and either fell apart when forging (Initially I was shooting for 1.8%C and then found out that much carbon in steel makes it a pain to forge!!!!) or had air bubbles.... This particular wootz cake was done in a propane furnace that I built. It has dendritic patterns on the surface but they were quite small. I ran the furnace up to temp then backed off a bit and finally killed the burner and sealed the furnace. Seems to of gotten a bit of annealing from the extra long cool down. Cut the cake in half and broke the center to show grain structure. Forging out the bar. The final bar was almost 2 feet long and I still have the other half of the cake left! Blade cut out of the finished bar and lightly etched Other side And here is the blade!! I have plans for a brass and maple burl handle And here is a close-up of the pattern. I feel that I got a pretty nice watered steel out of this! I only used about 6 inches of the bar for this knife. A lot of the people on this forum have publicly posted wootz content and I want to say thank you!
    12 points
  17. This is not what I was hoping to post but that will come soon. Just finished this little Hunter, 476 layer 1084 & 15N20, Brass, Bog Rata. Total length 22.5 cm, Blade 11 cm.
    12 points
  18. Yesterday was long but rewarding Finished filing the ball of the chape Then a few hours of final sanding and sharpening the blade. It was getting late but realized just how little there was left so decided to keep going and peened the guard onto the blade I have never liked the idea of using the compression from the grip and pommel to hold everything tight as wood is natural and soft. Oh and my vise in a vise setup to hold the blade Peening Then low tech stropping setup that actually works great for long blades And assembled! And got unusually dry and cloudy weather today to get petter pictures of it. That doesn't improve my photography though it ended up 60 grams heavier than the original and a centimeter longer but I am still overall quite happy with it
    12 points
  19. My humble beginnings began when I was just a kid. Always fascinated by fantasy, I made some wooden Legolas swords from the Lord of the Rings, and Aragorn's elvish dagger out of metal. Unfortunately this was before I had a camera, much less a camera phone (they didn't exist) so I don't have a photo of those. Moving on to 2014, halfway through college, the knife making bug bit me when I made the knife in the first photo. Un-hardened stainless steel from some scrap with plenty of scratch marks and mistakes.... but it looked cool I guess! Started a low output business, ran it successfully for a few years, and went off to be an adult after failing out of college. So here we are, 2022. I do it as a hobby for supplemental income now. No custom work unless I like ya. The other photos are some if my favorites, although maybe not my best or the most intricate, they are my cleanest work. This forum is what started it, and what has kept me going, albeit, a little slower these days due to life. Love you guys and am glad to be apart of everyone's journey and excited to see what everyone else is making from all experience levels. Cheers folks! -Austin
    12 points
  20. My mother commissioned me to make this one as a gift for her grandson (my nephew). He likes to fish and hunt, and my sister actually picked out a pattern from one I'd made years ago. It has contemporary elements like the ricasso and and etched logo, but I had to incorporate the seven pin bird-head handle to keep a little 18th century vibe going. I forged the blade from 1084. The handles are, as Dr. Jim would say, bovine ivory (cow bone). The pins are 6p finish nails. Leather sheath dyed with iron acetate and hardened with heat and bee's wax. 4.25" blade, 8" overall. I hate that I didn't get a good spine shot. I was extremely pleased with the distal taper in the tang and blade.
    12 points
  21. Just finished putting this one together. 1095 blade with hamon, fullers and filework. Carved yew handle. Fileworked copper fittings with bog oak throat insert and hand cut Skye Marble pommel setting. Brazed copper scabbard lined with felt and covered in lambskin. Storage box with copper accents, lined with leather and felt, with bog oak inserts. Let me know what you think...
    12 points
  22. Just finished this small narrow sax. Wrought iron and silver steel for the blade, box wood bolster and bog oak handle, carved with a bind rune for the recipient and a geometric border. Riveted copper draw ring with bronze bail. Tooled leather sheath with copper and bronze fittings. let me know what you think.
    12 points
  23. It’s been a long time since I posted anything this is the latest off my bench FullSizeRender.mov
    12 points
  24. Made this for the missus. Maybe 20 inches wide, forged the leafs at each end and then fold and forge weld to the bar. This isn't one of my designs, but I used to sell a lot of leafy hooks at the farmer's markets.
    11 points
  25. A few weeks ago I got asked to make a pattern welded migration sword. Well that kind of escalated and before I knew I had somehow got convinced to do a sutton hoo inspired sword which is well outside my comfort zone Here I'm starting with some billets, one destined to become the edge bar and the other the core rods Got three types of steel in the core rods for some added contrast hopefully And by this point the original idea of only three continuously twisted rods had changed into the four rod interrupted twists of the sutton hoo so had to make another billet for more rods, hence the differing sizes The rods are roughly 1cm squares, marked and punched for the twisting And twisted Then carefully squared up again By this point the edge bar had been drawn out and stacked a couple of times up to 336 layers so I cut a small piece of it off and forged a small knife to better see how that layer count would look. It's alright but could be finer so cut the bar kn half and welded again for 672 instead and forged another small knife to see and think it will look about right core bars were tack welded on the ends and then forge welded I have this obsession with vinegar soaking all my stuff in between forging rounds to clear out and scale and stuff that could contaminate later forge weldings. Does it make a difference? I have no idea but it makes me feel better. Then I drew out the edgebar into the same ca 1cm square. 1.5 meters of fun Edge bar wrapped around the core and tied in place Never done a wrap like this so spent half a day stressing over it before lighting up the forge and just do it. And everything forge welded albeit a bit rough right here Did some vinegar soaking and grinding before forging it better into shape. Then some more grinding and vinegar to get to this point. Am quite pleased how little the pattern distorted even though I ended up drawing and widening the piece a lot after the initial forge welding Then came a few days of grinding and even more draw filing followed by sanding it to 400 grit before applying some anti scale paint I'm still a complete noob when it comes to these paints and how thick or thin they should be applied so the results were less than stellar. Not that it mattered as now it was time to do some more grinding and blending the bevels into the flats Getting the blade to 240grit for now and will then wait with finer sanding and etchinf until scabbard and hilt are well on their way Talking about hilt. The guy who commissioned it ordered these very pretty things from Danegeld in the UK and had them sent to me. Some day I might venture into making these myself but that is not today.
    11 points
  26. Apologies for my spare participation here. The inspiration for the form of this knife is the Japanese kogatana/kozuka. I have long admired the simple form of these knives and the often sublimely beautiful art found on the kozuka handle. My desire to work in iron on the handle led to the idea of forging the iron to the blade, resulting in a one-piece knife with integral handle. Having recently begun collaborating with Nick Anger, I asked him about making a wood-grain (mokume) patterned blade and strategically forging iron to the back in the handle area. Nick’s highly skilled merging of the iron with the steel was impeccable and just what I had hoped for as a canvas for my engraving/inlay. The wrought iron has a lovely natural, earthy grain. The subject of my engraving is a pairing of pine and plum design. The style of engraving for the plum branch and blossoms is called kosuki-bori, practiced by Goto Ichijo (1791-1876) and passed to his student Funada Ikkin (1812-1863). It was mostly used to portray plum branch design. The plum blossoms are inlayed pure silver with rose-gold centers, which have engraved details and punched raised dot stamen-tips. The pine design served as a transition from the patterned blade steel to the iron handle with one small pine branch on the iron and another forward on the steel. The steel and iron both needed specific etch and patina, which were done after all shaping, engraving and polishing was completed. The blade etch was done by Nick with ferric chloride. I did the iron patina with the technique given to me by Toshimasa-sensei as outlined on my website. The shibuichi throat piece was carved in a wood-grain pattern and has 24k gold inlaid lichen. It was patinated with the traditional Japanese niage process. The saya/sheath is made from Wenge wood and was chosen for its pattern and colors harmonious to the iron patina.
    11 points
  27. Small friction folder I finished up awhile back I hate sawdust in my shop and waiting for glue to dry so I am always looking for ways to avoid using wood. Blade forged from 1084 and the rest is mild steel reverse twisted. IMG_1668.MOV IMG_1657.heic
    11 points
  28. This is a small "herb chopper" I made recently from one of my recent ingots. 1.6% C with a lamellar water pattern. Bog oak and titanium pants.
    11 points
  29. This took quite a while, the blades on these are relatively simple but oh the ridiculous amount of small individually shaped pieces in the hilt add up in all there are 49 individually shaped and finished pieces in the sword Some time in the far far future I might hope to be able to do something even half as inticrate and detailed as the originals. They are just utterly mind boggling once you take a good hard look at them and how they are made
    11 points
  30. Dubbed "The Fang of Caerbannog" for the rabbit tooling. This is what I would call a Type XVa/XVIIIc (open to feedback if you think it's mis-classed). It has a wide diamond blade with reasonably generous profile and distal taper. The tooling is a combination of vegetable vine and marginalia murder rabbit. The 6.5" grip is of poplar with a thread underwrap, and cord embossed leather overwrap. Hexagonal guard with tapered, upturned quillons. Tapered Type J with a slightly domed peen: This one is 8670 with mild steel fittings. Blade length: 33 3/4" Grip length: 6 1/2" Total length: 42 5/8" Mass: 1444g
    11 points
  31. Hello there, I finally finished the oyster knoife. It was fun and I tried and learned some new stuff on the way. The blade is 80CrV2 tempered as soft as I could without TME. It's got flat grinds and convex "edges". The "tentacle" guard is cold blued mild steel with copper sucker inserts. The spacer is acid aged copper and handle is myrtle.
    11 points
  32. And here is the finished sword. I can't quite stress enough how the pictures do not do it justice because the hilt is very light and the blade is very dark so no matter what I did, the contrast always looks off. I'm tempted to get it professionally photographed, but for now this is the best I can capture it. Here are the overall stats for the finished sword: - Overall Length: 51.875" (131.8cm) - Blade Length: 40.0" (101.6cm) - Blade Width at Base: 1.389" (3.527cm) - Blade Thickness at base: 0.260" (0.660cm) - Blade Width at Tip: 0.924" (2.346cm) - Blade Thickness at Tip: 0.080" (0.202cm) - Guard Width: 9.750" (24.765cm) - Grip Length: 7.750" (19.685cm) - Guard/Grip Thickness: 0.874" (2.220cm) - Pommel Length (Bottom Section): 1.852" (4.705cm) - Pommel Diameter (Bottom Section): 1.940" (4.928cm) - Pommel Thickness (Bottom Section): 1.433" (3.641cm) - Pommel Length (Top Section): 1.496" (3.800cm) - Pommel Diameter (Top Section): 1.512" (3.841cm) - Pommel Thickness (Top Section): 0.620" (1.576cm) - Weight: 3lbs 8.2oz (1.593kg) - Center of Gravity: 3.008" (7.640cm) - Primary Node (Center of Percussion): 25" (63.5cm) forward from guard - Secondary Node: 1.630" (4.140cm) back from guard - Forward Pivot Point: At point - Aft Pivot Point: 7" (17.8cm) forward of guard Thank you all for watching! -A.J.
    11 points
  33. Alright, finally managed to get the handle together and finalized the damn thing with a pommel nut today. My 2nd pommel nut ever, and first in pattern welded steel w. gold inlay. So, the handle wood is stabilized maple, with 925 silver and vulcanized fiber spacers. The bolster, pommel and mid-section are forged from railroad steel, engraved in a deep relief with 24k. gold inlay and set with two 0.03ct diamonds, four rubies and four sapphires. The runes of bolster and pommel reads: Hrothlitnir synir Sons of the Famous Wolf Skol ok Hati Skol and Hati. Mid-section reads: Surname of client.. and name of the blade - Ljos Sloknir, or in English - "Extinguisher of Light". A fitting name, as these two wolves - sons of the famous wolf, who you maybe already know - Fenris; will devour the sun and moon at Ragnarok. And.. I suppose.. here's the pics: Alright, that's it folks... And now I start on the sheath.. need to forge a new damasc billet for that one... Chiao! Alveprins.
    11 points
  34. Hi, i finally finished another long time project. Rohirrim spear. It is made of k720 steel and wrought iron. Horse heads are bronze, silver inlayed and they are brazed to the socket. I hope you will like it!
    11 points
  35. I'm working on these two machines at the moment! they are just so pretty I thought they should get their own thread! The 2 cwt is my personal hammer, now rebuilt after the fire. The 1 cwt is off to a customer. In the UK both of these machines are regarded as 'Rolls Royce' Not often you see them side by side in nice condition They are both ready for testing next week. Busy busy!
    11 points
  36. Hello Everyone, I am still making things. I have also been restoring antiques for the past couple of years. I can't post pictures of them, though. The people that own them are often pretty picky about who knows they own them. But, it has made me better, I think. Here is a Qing Dynasty Willow Leaf Dao with a blade with a medial ridge. I hope you like it.
    10 points
  37. Those that know , know. Last year at the Ashoken seminar Kevin Cashen started a New tradition by donating a knife to raffle off in support of the Saturday night whiskey Tasting/ Memorial I volunteered to continue the tradition and to do this years knife. This is an experimental pattern weld I did for my donation , the steels are 15n20 1080 and 1075, the handle is stabilized Koa and the bolster/ pin are bronze, the edge bard is 150 layer the spine 1075 the rest is mosaic tiles of 1080/15n20. the Idea is a moon lit tree line with a roaring camp fire, the image in my mind, represents some of my fondest memories of the fellowship I have felt attending Ashoken.. There is a more detail build through forth coming on my Pateron but i am happy to answer any question on how i did any of this. I will not be about to make ashoken this year (double booked with a teaching job) but the knife will be there and will be raffled off.. Tim Nue already mentioned how he is looking forward t it being in him kitchen I suspect he will be buying more than a few tickets. MP PXL_20220913_211809783.mp4
    10 points
  38. Good evening folks! Yet another 8" ktip in 26c3. Tempered a little harder this time at 64hrc. Weighting in at 8oz with point of balance straight at heel. I liked the look of the blued steel/copper/dark wood I used on the oyster knoife so I used that combo again on this one . I played maybe a bit too much with facets, but it ended up quite comfortable despite the sharp looking edges.
    10 points
  39. Hello, i recently got that knife into my hands. Probably it is a knife from Dale, the city which was destroyed by dragon Smaug and after his death it was rebuilt. The knife comes from times after the city was restored. My opinion about its origin is based on two main things. First is obvious, it is a dragon head which is on top of the "locking mechanism". Second one is the style of decoration which we can see on the knife. Acording those sharp edges of the inlayed parts and a little carving in scales, i assume that it is influenced by the art of dwarfs who have their kingdom under the Mountain which is quite close to the Dale. Certainly it is not a dwarven work because it doesn' t reach to their craft level. Now to knife itself: Blade is made if wrought iron with high carbon steel edge and it is decorated by light carving, silver eye and copper teeth of the dragon. The handle has wrought iron bolsters with deep etch and silver inlay. Scales are made of swamp oak and they are decorated by beaded silver wire.
    10 points
  40. Early style knife forged from 5160, walnut scales and pewter bolsters
    10 points
  41. It's been a loooong time since I have posted anything and frankly a long time since I have made anything interesting, so I thought I would share this as a WIP. I am getting remarried this fall and wanted to make something special for the occasion. I decided to go with a cake server. I was having trouble finding inspiration from existing cake servers so I instead took inspiration from stilettos. At this point the blade is solid sterling silver, a "neck" of bronze, and the handle will be faux ivory g10. Some of these design elements will change over the course of the process as frankly I'm being indecisive. But enough of that and on to the photos. The starting materials, 1/2 round bronze rod and 1 inch round: And the silver for the blade with bronze for inserts on the blade. I do not have a lathe or mill anymore since I stopped doing knifemaking fulltime and have downsized the shop. So I used the old poverty lathe in the form of my drill press to rough out some details. Then I moved on to files to add in the facets: Then I put a 1/2 inch diameter hole in a slice of the 1 inch round. Then I faceted the 1 inch round to prepare for drilling: Then I was able to drill holes in all the facets: I then textured the faces of the facets and attached the pins: This is now ready for bending the neck and joining to the silver blade. More to come soon.
    10 points
  42. Started this one last year sometime and spent the past couple of days making a sheath finishing up the details. Blade is about 7" light and fast clay hardened 1095. Blackened steel sculpted guard and pommel nut with sculpted brass washers and hammer textured ferrule. Turned bubinga handle. Scabbard is laminated millboard covered in pigskin with a frogged belt loop and copper chape and locket: let me know what you think...
    10 points
  43. another couple I'm finishing up after starting them years ago. 1095 sycamore and copper: let me know what you think...
    10 points
  44. This was my first attempt at a split & drifted axe. I uses a chisel I had and forged the eye drift out of a piece of 1" round stock. My grandson had a birthday coming up and his father had given me a big piece of dump truck leaf spring, so I thought I would give it a try. I didn't have a suitable hold-down, so I tacked a piece of 1" angle to the back of it so I could keep it in my hardee hole white I split it. (I also drilled a couple cheater holes to keep things straight). This is what I wound up with: This was based loosely on what 18th Century reenactors know as a "Fort Miegs belt axe". The original (repro, not artifact) I have is smaller. This was to be a beefed up version. Unfortunately, I didn't get any good "as finished" pictures. You can tell from the tree sap and finger prints that it had already entered into field testing. Handle from an old hickory sledge hammer handle with an osage wedge. You could pretty much read his mind when he first unwrapped it. I doubt it will look as good the next time I see it, but I'm sure it will undergo rigorous testing. So I'll find out soon enough if I did my job right.
    10 points
  45. Hi everyone! Hope you've all survived the Holiday feasting without too much abdominal pain! (and yet we have New-Year eve right around the corner! ) Anyhow, I've been working on this Seax inspired blade... It is not exactly historically correct - but I weighed my need for self expression higher than historically accuracy in this project. Below is a preview of the blade itself. Currently I am working on the handle - more specifically the rear bolster. Engraving is a time consuming process I'm afraid... The blade length from where the tang meets the blade and to the tip is approx. 38 cm. All inlay is 24k gold wire, with the exception of the wolf's tongue - which is in copper. It is engraved like this on both sides of the blades, with the verse 40 of the Voluspá. English: Side A: 40. In the east sat the old in Ironwood and there gave birth to Fenris children; Side B: Just one of these of all of them becomes the moon-thief in troll's guise. Old Norse: Side A: 40. Austr sat in aldna í Járnviði ok fœddi þar Fenris kindir; Side B: verðr af þeim öllum einna nökkurr tungls tjúgari í trolls hami. And here's the pics: And that's it for now. Enjoy the New-Year festivities everyone, and wish you all good health and prosperity in the year to come! Sincerely, Alveprins.
    10 points
  46. Hi, I based on the archaeological find from Gniezo (Poland). It is dated to early-medieval. Blade length is 20 cm. Wolf's teeth have been made "unplugged", I used only basic and historical tools. I used several kind of the materials, mostly scrap.
    10 points
  47. 1080/15N20 twisted crushed W's ,stainless dovetailed bolster.
    10 points
  48. just finishing these up. 1075, mild steel copper and bog oak: let me know what you think...
    9 points
  49. Forged this guy from 5160. Scotchbrite finish on the bevels, 320-grit on the flats and false edges. 316 stainless steel guard with black fiber spacer. Black micarta pin and European red stag handle. The blade is .220” at the guard, with a very slight distal taper.
    9 points
  50. I know everyone has blades they forged and maybe even heat treated laying around waiting for inspiration to finish them out. I've got blades that have been waiting ten years or more. Here are three of a batch of four I finished up a while back. I sold the forth one without getting a picture, and it was probably the best looking of the lot. This is the big one... 1084, copper, and stag: This is the middle one. 1084, copper, and stag: And this is the baby of the bunch. I don't know how long this has been in my "to do" box. It is an old Black Diamond file, steel pins, and as Dr. Jim would say, "bovine ivory" slabs (sounds so much more dignified than "cow bone"): And here's everybody all dressed up: That center-seam job looks a lot better in real life than in this picture. Hat's off to Mr. Ellerbe.
    9 points
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