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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/15/2021 in all areas

  1. Howdy.. Well it has been an interesting last bit...took a bit of maneuvering , wheeling/dealing and being creative to stay afloat with minimal (if any) studio time but now that things have turned around and orders are once again coming in..I am BACK!! I did get some serious writing done on book IV as well as figure out how to get a bigger chuck of that wavy feather pattern I have been worklng on..here is the reult of one blade for the cover photo of book IV.. I am keeping this one for myself. 31" blade, double fullers, file worked spine..(wore out 3 files do
    15 points
  2. And I am all done! I am really happy with how it turned out, the whole build went really smoothly. I bought a new file guide and almost immediately my guard fit improved a lot, it is still not totally perfect, but quite close. This is all takedown construction without a single drop of glue, though the guard doesn´t come off without removing the threaded rod. The low layer damascus was a pain to finish, in the end I removed all the oxides and went for a silvery gray instead of contrast. This was my first time working with stainless, and it really is pain t
    9 points
  3. Finished this commissioned piece the other day. Blade 11" long feather pattern of 1084/15N20. Guard made of railroad spike, 15N20 and couple end pieces of damascus. Handle stabilized redwood with centre core of mahogany that had some personal meaning for the customer. Was a challenge in may ways for me! Clint
    8 points
  4. This one was ordered by a friend's mother as a 40th birthday present for him. He's an ex recce sniper and a wilderness guide, so I inlayed some spent .308 brass in the handle (I wanted to use .337, but I don't shoot long guns, and could only buy them by the 100, which would have cost about as much as the knife. But .308 is the classic British Military sniper round, and Highland stalking round, so it's all good...) and used .22 and .22 magnum for the lanyard hole liner. 1095 blade, clay hardened with fileworked tang. Red deer antler scales, with copper pins. The lanyard is made of a fairly stil
    8 points
  5. Well, I really cannot believe it has been this long, but I finally did a test run on this puppy. Starting the fire was its own learning curve, but I got it lit. Once it was cooking pretty well we started to heat a big piece of 14 ga, sheet to raise a birdbath bowl. I was the shop boy and tended the fire while Liz did the shaping and forging.
    7 points
  6. The hawk is approx 19" long x 8" with a 2" cutting edge. The main body is made from 8 bars of twisted pattern weld with approx 20 layers in each bar with a 400 layer cutting edge. The smoke bowl is made from 9 bars of twisted pattern weld arranged in a 3x3 cube and worked to shape then hard silver soldered to the main body. Many Thanks to Alan for supplying the Curly Maple haft which I have treated with Aqua Fortis to bring out the figure and banding. The wooden beads are Californian Buckeye and Redwood and the smoke hole stopper is Buffalo horn.
    6 points
  7. Nearly there! I'm not a big fan of menuki. From what I read they are supposed to improve the grip, but in my opinion they make handles bulkier than they should be. Perhaps this is because I have really small hands. I also don't want to skip them, there seems to be a consensus that they really *should* be there, so I chose to have them very thin and narrow, so they only minimally impact the grip. I carved a couple of bamboo trunks out of copper, I figured they will add a bit of color on an otherwise black and white handle. I still di
    6 points
  8. I said patination was next but I guess I lied, I resumed work on the tsuka (handle) first. I took it to the belt grinder and thinned it down by about 1/8 inch on each side to make room for the ray skin and the ito wrap. When working on my wakizashi last year, I had drilled the "mekugiana" early (the hole in the blade handle), right as I finished the blade, picking an arbitrary spot that I thought to be balanced/pleasing to the eye. This caused me much headache later on when laying out the plan for the handle because there are many (*many*) variables to align, and that
    6 points
  9. A great pic of our wee town (pop 430) on the Lawrence Noticeboard page this morning. The arrow points down the gully we live in, on one of the three ways in and out of town. a couple taken last spring down the gully to our street and our spot on the 1/2 acre we call home. Shed (split block 6 car garrage) is above and behind the house. You may even see a couple of sheep in the paddock that are part of our meat supply
    6 points
  10. I started working on the tsuka (handle) core a while ago, I just couldn't make much progress until some of the fittings were further along and I knew my final dimensions. With the fuchi done, I was able to resume some of the work. Here I'm adjusting the fuchi-side to size, using the first knife I made a few years ago And with that, the handle is back on hold. For the kashira (buttcap) I started by making the punch and die jig. This was straightforward but not pretty. I used a die grinder for most of the die work, and I'm sure I'll
    6 points
  11. Made another one of these after someone saw a pic of the last one on here. 1080, copper and leather: let me know what you think...
    6 points
  12. Hi everyone - thought I'd share the latest one... I give you Sǫg Tǫnn (Saw Tooth) - forged in honor of the innumerable abandoned wood mills scattered around the country, left to rot as their purpose has been served long ago. How many a farm has been made possible due to the many-toothed high carbon blades - spinning tirelessly day and night, through summer and winter? How many noble trees has met their end at the sawblade's edge in order to fulfill an even higher purpose of keeping man and livestock dry and warm? Hail to you, old saw-mills covered in moss, wi
    5 points
  13. Made this as part of a makers challenge on facebook. Got a little carried away. 1075, maple, steel and copper: Not quite finished in this pic, but you get the idea. build album is here let me know what you think...
    5 points
  14. Very nice gal who requested a specific knife I made before wanted the same for her father as a wedding gift for her wedding. This was a pleasure to complete this and deal with a rather nice person. Rather simple design knife.... nothing elaborate. Gary LT
    5 points
  15. Hello All. I am finally back making knives,. In April, I sold my first knife in 30 years. Hard to believe. The pandemic got me off the road and looming retirement made me kick it in gear. I have been making blades over the past few years but they were mostly to test my clay coatings. At this stage in my life I have narrowed my scope-a lot. Japanese inspired with single bevel, urashi and hamon. The longer blades are trademarked as Texas BrisketSword™. Kind of a long story for another time. All W2. English Yew and Desert Ironwood handles Texas Oak stand
    5 points
  16. Got the blade finished up and etched this evening. The "flames" actually turned out better than I thought. Now I just have to keep from screwing it up tomorrow when I glue the scales on.
    5 points
  17. Perhaps nowhere is that more true than in bladesmithing. There are just infinite journeys within journeys available to us, depending on which aspect catches your interest. The trouble is it can distract you from your original goal. When I started down this road in 1998, my goal was to be able to make a perfect wrought nail (it's an archaeologist thing, don't ask). 23 years later I can make iron and steel from rocks and charcoal, I can forge axes and swords, engrave after a limited fashion, recreate migration-era pattern-welded blades, and even make stainless folding knives. I still can't
    5 points
  18. I believe this is the mystery anvil.
    5 points
  19. Annnnd that is a new milestone for me.
    5 points
  20. Took a little family portrait at the local guild meeting yesterday.
    4 points
  21. Past year has been busy, haven’t had tons of time for knives, but got this one done Old Nicholson file so probably w2 And curly pear handle, first time i ever tried a coke bottle shape besides a few minor issues, less than the previous knives though. onto the next !
    4 points
  22. After several attempts, each ending in an ingot thst didn't fully melt last night I finally got one that did. It's small 155 grams but it's my first success and I'm really excited about it. I melted this one in my forge, crucible suspended above my clinker breaker with tongs, piled up coal around it. Took about an hour to reach moltel though I probably got there sooner. Slowly ramped the blast down over half an hour and left it to cool till black. Structure looks good and it's not sparking as cast iron thankfully. Going to thermal cycle this today and attempt forging...gently. Pray my luck c
    4 points
  23. Hi all, i just begin my next custon seax. Here the draw i make with the customer : Blade from wrought iron / 1.3505 sanmai. 210mm long and 6mm thick. 40mm high at the broken back. Ruggero
    4 points
  24. 4 points
  25. 1084/15N20 with an attempt at a flame type pattern along the edge, stabilized* pine handle with brass pins. Blade is .140" thick at the spine, tapering to .040" at the butt of the handle. Pine is definitely not a typical handle choice. This particular knife was built as a gift to a friend and mentor who was one of the biggest influences on my firefighting career. The piece of pine that I used for the handle played a big part in one of the most memorable calls that we ever ran together. As always, comments and critiques are very welcome. Thanks for lookin
    4 points
  26. The 260mm long Gyuto right before I take it to my disc sander to true up surfaces and grind in the convexity. First time hitting it with a nital rub to see what's actually going on. Will deff. Do a nital dip instead. It's just a dirty polish on the grinder as I go back to 60 grit on the disc. The little bit of decarb towards tbe edge is tenacious and may not grind out, ah well.
    4 points
  27. Actually, that is a pretty good first attempt. You have what is a common problem for beginners, a short, steep, fat edge bevel. That sort of grind does not cut very well. If you were to cut an apple, for instance, it would cut up to the start of the flat, and then it would split the apple, tearing and cracking it. I assume that you cut this out and tried to grind an edge with an angle grinder? Draw filing would get you better results, but it's a tough go to draw file hard steel. But for a first try, you are miles ahead of my first knife. Of course back then, all we had were rocks, a
    4 points
  28. The dimension you couldn't see in that picture was the 1/4" thickness. She was pretty well drawn out there. Did a little profile grinding today, and test etch.
    4 points
  29. This time is not "wasted". It may seem like a glib comment, but I am fond of the saying "The real difference between a master and an apprentice is the master has failed more times than the apprentice has ever tried." Some of the most difficult things I had to learn came with multiple failures. These were all part of the learning process and now I know more things "not to do" than I know things "to do". Just wait until you finally reach the point where you are using a new blade steel and are curious as to whether you are getting the heat treat right. You will take a forged blade, grind i
    4 points
  30. In the 18 years or so I've been on the forum, you're only the second person I've seen make shitodome, and your explanation and process pics are much more clear than the first guy some 17 years ago. And stop laughing, guys, it's pronounced something like "Sheeto-domeh," not what you're thinking.
    4 points
  31. I finished up 9 sheaths I have been working on in preparation for the Blade Show. The one on the lower left is for that little by-knife I did. I shamelessly stole the knot carving design from Petr Floriniak. Actually, I stole the sewn-in belt loop design from him too. Same on both sides.
    4 points
  32. Pretty dang happy how this turned out, I'll be changing my forging of the next on to start above ACM to get a more wattered pattern but for my first time I'd say it's pretty good.
    3 points
  33. And even more. Slowly getting better at ending up with a cladding somewhat symmetrical between sides. Forging them very close to thickness to get the cladding close to the edge has had me sweating in the grinding room about actually finding the core steel
    3 points
  34. Haha for some reason these pictures were flipped by my phone, and they didn't want to straighten up. Modern technology is not really my thing. Thanks, The swage block was plasma cut from plate, and is the perfect horizontal surface for stuff like this to accumulate onto.
    3 points
  35. Facinating look at flintnapping through to a beautiful finished knife.
    3 points
  36. Hello fellows and happy Friday! I’d be more specific about the knife type if I had a clue as to what to call it. Finished it up and added it to my site. Sold on the second day! Nothing feels quite as nice as selling a knife. So 1084, local maple, bronze pins, and veg tanned leather. Thanks for looking and as always, constructive criticism is always appreciated.
    3 points
  37. Well I scrubbed as much of the black off that I could, it's not all gone but it's better. Between all the spring cow work I managed to get a sheath made for it and glam shots taken. It's all ready to go to blade show with me next week. Thank you to all the people who have helped me work through this knife. I've learned a lot with this build and wouldn't have even tried it if not for the encouragement from my fellow knifemakers to go beyond my skill level. I have plenty to improve on with the next one, this is just a small step in the journey.
    3 points
  38. Knife #7 1075 aldos 5.5 inch blade Cocobolo, ebony and elk enter handle. Differentially heat treated. Traded making this for a bandsaw and a planer. Having trouble letting it go now......
    3 points
  39. Finally got some time to work on my own stuff, and did some rough grinding on the Damascus blade. Had to do a quick etch to see how she is gonna look... now to clean her up and get ready for the heat treat
    3 points
  40. Ok! Everyone’s Suggestions were spot on to get this weld to work! I was able to keep both sides attached MUCH better! The downside is I made a critical error in the design, and thinned the socket down to WAY WAY too little material.... SO ON TO THE LAP WELDED VERSION! So far this guy seems to be holding up like a champ! Took forging well, and heat treat good. it is wrought Iron and 1065 though instead of the antique spring steel I was using, so that could be a big part of the success... My plan is to rivet him onto the haft and mayb
    3 points
  41. I only had an hour or so to play in the shop today. I did manage to get my new quench tube mounted in preparation for an upcoming machete build. Also had a bit to play on the grinder and got my current hunter project up to a 600 grit machine finish. A quick test etch because I never have the patience to wait : I was trying for a "flame" pattern along the edge. Not exactly what I wanted, but not too bad for a first try.
    3 points
  42. Clutha River Corromandel Cromwell Desert Road Devils Staircase Doubtfull soubnd Fiordland National Park
    3 points
  43. I stole this off the web, but it's a good place to start. A hollow grind is like what you see on razors (an extreme example) but also on some factory knives whose names I won't mention. A flat grind is the sort of thing you see on kitchen knives. A saber (or noob) grind is usually seen in jig ground blades done on large stone wheels. Chisel grinds are seen on chisels and some kinds of japanese knives. Convex, or appleseed, grinds have thin edges with some mass behind the edge for strength. Scandi grinds are not the best cutters, but make for good bushcraft tools. This is pretty gene
    3 points
  44. Get someone to show you the first time. It's one of those things where a practiced eye is worth more than thousands of words. Having said that, it would be good have a look at your forge setup. Everyone's eye sees color differently, and ambient conditions can alter what you're seeing. When I say that I want the billet to be a nice even butter color, that's what I'm seeing with my eyes (and being red/green colorblind, I see red spectra differently from many people), in my shop, in my equipment. I don't know what you will be looking at in your shop. That's where someone who has don
    3 points
  45. Matthew, from what we can tell at sites that produced crucible steel in the old days, the old crucibles were mostly one-shot deals. If they lasted long enough to produce a single good puck that was enough, then they were crushed and used again. I suspect a lot of the very early development (WAY pre-iron age) of metal casting was luck, in the same way as when the Navaho started casting silver in the 1700s they discovered that old pottery shards from one abandoned pueblo in Canyon de Chelly made decent, if small, crucibles. Not that the wootz producers were using old potsherds necessarily, but
    3 points
  46. Pots are serious business, and I don't even like clay ;-)
    3 points
  47. Back to the tsuba. It took me a while to decide on the actual design for the reverse side. I knew I wanted 1) a mirror image of the moon, waxing instead of waning, and 2) a young bamboo to contrast with the mature bamboo on the obverse. This is to tie this katana to her sister blade, a wakizashi I made last year that featured a young and a mature bamboo on the sides of its habaki. I worked on the mirror moon and clouds while still mulling over the young bamboo design: My issue was that a young bamboo meant thin shoots and slender leaves,
    3 points
  48. Seeing as how I'm not seeing any references to kitchen meat slicers in the last page of this thread, I'm thinking he's a spammer. Maybe @Alan Longmire can confirm one way or the other.
    3 points
  49. Haha, I've never actually made any. From my understanding over the years, you can spend as much time learning to make the perfect crucible as you would spend making the steel. To me it is just too much of an added variable whilst trying to reduce thr amount of variables possible. silicon carbide crucibles while expensive are a necessary cost. The assurance that it's far less likely to expel its contents so as long as you know when enough is enough with them is well worth it. The cost of making a new furnace kinda outweighs the savings jn crucibles to me. It's also easy. You buy it,
    3 points
  50. Simple solution: Drop the "r". Cows are much bigger targets, generally stand still a lot, and taste much better. More meat per shot, too!
    3 points
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