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  1. 13 points
    All: It's been about two years since the death of my father. He died unexpectedly and suddenly. Him and I were working on our jointly owned boat in Cordova, Ak and he got a stomach ache. A few days later he was diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic Cancer. Ten days later he died. We had a few days to say goodbye. The very last beer I shared with my Dad was sitting on the flying bridge of his Boat in what was going to be his retirement home in Florida. I asked him what he wanted done at his funeral. In my Dad's characteristic humor he said he wanted me to build a Viking ship and put him on it, pushing it out to sea. i laughed and said that I'd probably go to jail for that. Then we hatched this plan. My family are commercial fishermen from Cordova, Alaska. We lived on the water. My dad always hoped he was of Viking descent. He was intensely disappointed to find out we were not when DNA tests became available. I wanted to share these pics and the video with you guys (my brothers in craftsmanship), but it was too close to the event. It was too personal. Enough time has passed, and I think it's okay to show you what we did. I say "we," because this build was like a long goodbye to my Dad. He was the woodworker. I was the metal guy. I had never built anything more complex than a small cabin out of wood. I had a lot of long conversations with him during this build. Most of them were in the form of: "I know, Dad! But we don't have time to redo that bit. Your funeral is in like seven days!" My buddy Shane Harvey designed this scale model of a Viking Longship from blueprints obtained from the Copenhagen museum in Denmark in CAD and then cut the keel and ribs on his CNC plywood cutter. He also did the dragon head and the small shields with my Dad's initials (RS) on them. The cutting of the cedar planks (each one cut on a table saw by me), the glue up, etc. took almost 20 days of intense work. I totally underestimated the amount of time it would take. All the lessons I had to learn as I went . . . Just in time I had it stained, varnished, and loaded onto my truck for the ferry ride to Cordova. We loaded the boat up with things my Dad loved. Including the very first sword I ever made when I was 12 with his help (ground from a long file), his favorite hat, a jar of peanut butter (his favorite food), and a gin and tonic in a viking horn (not traditional, but it was his drink). And then we set it on fire. It burned until it swamped, and then we sunk it in a bay that he loved. Anyway, hope you like the build. It's not a blade, but I know you guys well enough to know you'll be okay with this off topic post. Cheers, Dave PS: Drone footage by Shane Harvey.
  2. 11 points
    Finished this just this afternoon. Haven't put an edge on it yet, but just couldn't wait to show it off! Time for critiques.
  3. 11 points
    When I first got interested in mustard patinas, I asked around how it was done and the answer I got was "you put mustard on the blade". While I understand it meant there was no wrong ways to do it, I was hoping for a bit more details . Now that I've done a few patinas and had A LOT of requests on how I get this stonewashed look, I'm going to give you the details in this short tutorial. This bladesport'ish blade was not intended to have a patina but it was the only one I had around that's large enough for a good demo. In case you wondered, it is 80CrV2 steel. This patina will work pretty good on any simple carbon or tool steels, as long as they don't contain too much nickel like 15n20 or L6. The nickel increases the steel's resistance to acid. So, what I first do is hand sand the blade to #800. It may not be necessary but I like how, after the patina is done, the blade is still shiny from a certain angle of view and shows how good the finish is. After the blade is finished and cleaned with acetone or brake cleaner, I use these cotton pads to dab the mustard. Only a small amount of mustard is necessary. The thinner the layer, the darker the finish. I dab a LOT to get an even layout. Now is the time to let it dry. Wait at least 30 minutes. Then clean thoroughly in soapy water and dry. Here's what it looks like after just one layer. You may be satisfied and stop there or do a second layer for a darker and more homogeneous finish. Everywhere there was tiny mustard spikes is where the blade did barely etch and shows those lighter spots. Now a second coat. And how it looks after a good cleaning. I have found that applying a thin film of food grade mineral oil darkens the finish even further. It's not been applied yet on these photos. If you have any questions, please ask and I'll update the tutorial if needed.
  4. 10 points
    Hi all! After a long time I signed there because I made new knife which is available. It is small knife overall lenght is 22,5 cm, blade 10 cm and handle 12,5. Welded blade is forged from old, broken springs of agriculture machine and from the bearings. These springs I found unders old oaks on Kovalovec meadows. Guard is from patinated bronze and on handle is small patch of cow bone, which I found on the way to the Skalica hills. Last part I bought from my friend and it is Palisander Honduras burl wood. Hand sewn scandinavian type sheath with leather inserts in the blade part. Leather, knitted lanyard with small decoration from same wood as on handle. Price 370 USD with shipping. Paypal accepted. Contact on me: jakubpetras.noze@gmail.com
  5. 10 points
    Hello: Here is the first sword I finished in 2020...The blade is 1070..the Hamon.. well, I dunno what to call it... Togari Gunome maybe?? finished with temple lion motif fittings from my art foundry guys in Taiwan..They do a great job..yes they do!! Much better than an old ham handed reprobate like I could do..... Black samegawa under that black and gold Chevron Tsuka-ito that I adore.. This is another proto for book IV which is coming along splendidly even if I do say so myself.. The siya is black lacquer that I dripped/ "flicked" Testors model airplane paint (metallic gold) on and then sealed with 6 coats of hard, clear lac.. I got the idea from a siya that one of my friends down here showed me a while back...turned out non too shabby but there is still room to improve on that...I do know I need to find a better price on that stuff..it is $$$...Hope the photos work out... Note: This Hamon didn't turn out like I wanted.. I was going for more of a crashing/breaking ocean wave/surf sort of thing but that isn't what happened.. Like I have said before...Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted to.. Happy 2020... JPH
  6. 10 points
    I wanted to make a very traditional folder, something as traditional as quaffing mead, boar hunting, getting into a long boat and raiding the coastlines of Europe. So I designed and made a pocket seax. This is the second one, the first had the thicker, more rounded handle of a fixed blade seax, so I decided to trim the handle down while retaining a bit of a rise towards the end. This one is 4" long from bolster to the end of the lanyard loop. I am thinking of doing a smaller, 3 1/2" version as well. SAE1070 blade and spring, Brass bolsters and liners, pink ivory scales. I did the carving on the bolsters. Questions and comments welcome!
  7. 10 points
    How to Carve Netsuke and Miniature Sculpture: Free PDF Download This is a link to a detailed 361 page instruction book on how to carve netsuke and miniature sculpture. The file is in Adobe Acrobat PDF format.

It requires Adobe Acrobat Reader http://sterlingsculptures.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Carving_Netsuke.pdf
  8. 10 points
    For many years now I was business partners with Peter Swarz-Burt and watched him making wootz . I learned a ton from him over the years. Well Peter left the shop last June,moved to HI infact. After peter left I got an order for a wootz knife . There were a few bars laying around I could use so I took the job.. the bars failed .. so I began my dissent into wootz making . This is the first piece completed from My wootz
  9. 10 points
    Hello: Been sorta busy around here with family stuff since we have a brand new granddaughter so this is something I whipped out real quick.. This one is welded from a mix of 1095, L-6 and a bit of meteoric iron thrown in ..8 1/4" Maiden Hair blade...Phosphor bronze mounts...Some of that bowling ball material for the fluted grip..This piece looks like a deep reddish maple burl! Turned out OK...at least I think so... The sheath is set with a 17.65 Ct star ruby.. cut this one myself.. All in all I think it didn't turn out too bad.. Hope the photos work... This one is website stock and is currently listed there... JPH
  10. 10 points
    This is the latest collaboration sword from myself Petr Florianek . We wanted to make another fantasy sword yet at the same time keeping a firm grip on reality. This a very much a “real” sword but also a dragon slaying hero’s sword! The sword blade takes inspiration from early Saxon blades, marrying that history into Tolkien’s middle earth and the world of the Rohirrim horse lords. The blade was made by myself and the handle and scabbard are Petr’s work. The blade takes inspiration from early Saxon patternwelded blades and has a lenticular section giving it the heft and strength needed when fighting dragons! It is important for me that anything I make has a functional reality to it. A reality based upon the imagined purpose of the object . This is the sword of a mighty horselord hero with the pride and fate of his people behind him. A sword for battling a dragon. Bryneleoma has a patternwelded blade 3 core bars twisted anticlockwise, clockwise and anticlockwise, the core bars are wrapped in a high layer damascus edge . The bold core pattern contrasting the fine layers of the edge. In Petr’s words… I wanted to make a truly heroic sword and when given Owen’s mighty blade, I had enough inspiration to get the feel of it. The blade is hefty and long so I immediately started to picture a mounted warrior; a hero on a horse, a proto knight if you will. The inspiration for this sword is firmly set in Tolkien’s Middle Earth, in the world of the Rohirrim horse lord. The motives for ornamentation are simple – he dragon on the pommel as the most powerful enemy but also a symbol to ward off evil. On the handle a series of knots representing fate being spun by higher beings. The knot on the guard symbolises oath, the oath of the horse lord bound to his people as their protector. An oath from sword to swordsman, the guard of the sword being there to protect its heroic master. I love doing these pieces with Petr, and always look forward to getting the finished piece. He has a way of bringing a blade to life.....
  11. 10 points
    Hunter , 1095, brass, leather, deer antler, total length 25.5 cm blade 13 cm.
  12. 10 points
    It seems Brian and I both had the idea to follow Steve Culver's instruction book on how to built a slipjoint folder without making patterns first. Like Brian, I know this is not going to be my last one! This one is bound for Knife in the Hat, and I will use what I learned making it to make the next one even better. Specs: Blade and backspring, 3/32" precision ground O-1 flat bar Brass liners with Nickel Silver bolsters and pins. Jigged bone scales from Culpepper & Co., Amber dyed, Catalina pattern. Open length 5 7/8" / 147mm, blade length 2 5/8" / 66mm. Closed length 3 1/4" / 82mm Maximum thickness 3/8" / 11mm I made two changes from Culver's design. I omitted the scale pin near the peak of the liners because I thought it was unnecessary and distracting, and I rounded the tang because I've never liked a knife with a half-stop. It just seems ridiculous to me and serves no purpose except to break your thumbnail if the spring is too strong. Speaking of which, I am really happy with the spring. It isn't too heavy, and the knife snaps open and closed with authority. The judge of how strong to make the spring is my wife, if she thinks it's too strong, back to the grinder! It feels much like any good factory knife of its size, spring strength-wise. And now for the pics! The problems I had with this one: 1. The pivot pin is not invisible on one side. 2. The blade is not dead center when closed. 3. A minor slip at the grinder moved the left-hand plunge line back into the kick. 4. While soldering the bolsters, the scribed line on the right bolster was not where I thought it was, resulting in a mismatch between the two sides. Much colorful language and careful filing followed. There has been a bit more cleanup on it after these pics were taken, mostly to remove that facet on the underside of the bolsters. I also engraved that spot with my initials since I forgot to do the blade prior to hardening...
  13. 10 points
    Id like to credit this award to all the foundation work and help i acquired over the last couple years directly from this forum! Without you guys I don't know how far i would have progressed but i wouldn't be where i'm at for sure. Anyway, Im still in shock. I wanted to show and give credit to Alan and salem and the other 100 guys on here that have given me A LOTTTT of their time answering dumb questions. Also, to encourage the newer guys to keep cranking out stuff and trying and making knives! 320 layers Laddered (appears random until you see the chatoyance) -trippy forged integral 2.5" tall at the heel 9.25" long Amboyna 5 stack of g10 spacers 5.5 oz
  14. 10 points
    Don gave me this blade five or six years ago and said, "Make something beautiful with it". Hmm, ok, so it rumbled around in my mind until last fall. It was a slow process figuring out the transition, theme and all the details, but I think it came good in the end. I didn't find out until it was almost finished that it was Don's last patterned blade. I knew it had to be one of the last, but THE last. I'm glad I didn't know as I was working on it. Below is a little of what I've written. More to be read here: Kelso Journal And a slide show with more photos here: Fogg/Kelso In keeping with the persona of a hunting knife, I chose to represent features of the Vermont woodlands that would be familiar to a skilled, observant woodsman. These include tracks of the Red Fox, leaves of Red Maple, Beech, and Red and White Oaks, and a feather. The feather was modeled from the Ruffed Grouse, but altered in shape and color to fit the surroundings. I chose a feather as a sign of passage, which in the case of birds, could be molting, conflict, flight or death. Feathers have such deep and subtle beauty. My wife Jean and I have a collection and I always wonder, when finding a single feather, what the story was. The tracks, leaves and feather are all signs, marking activity and transition, the meaning of which is read by the skilled woodsman. This project has been very satisfying for a number of reasons. I was touched and honored when Don gave me the blade to finish. I did not realize until the piece was nearly finished that it was his last patterned blade, which greatly enhances the meaning for me. Don is a legend in the smithing world, and rightly so. Apart from his technical innovations, he has an artistic eye, both for pattern and form, which is rarely, if ever matched. In addition, his Bladesmith’s Forum stands as an unparalleled online resource for beginning and accomplished knifemakers.
  15. 10 points
    Let me present Roðinn Hrafn - the Red or "Bloodstained Raven". Blade in folded and twisted railroad steel, in a san-mai lamination with Øberg steel for the core. Handle in stabilized Maple, with Holly for the core, copper, brass and vulcanized fiber. The Holly is engraved with Elder Futhark runes - written in old Norse - and filled with ashes. Any and all critique, is ... as always - most welcome. :) Sincerely, Alveprins.
  16. 9 points
    Hi all! I hope you are well, here I bring you the second part of a work that began with Gib Frid, a sword that we showed earlier and that served as a school sword to perform Dark Sister. Dark Sister is a famous Valyrian steel longsword, one of two ancestral swords of House Targaryen. Not having Valyrian steel, we forged the blade in 400 layer of 5160 and 15n20 in an Oakeshott type XVIIIc designed geometrically as its sister Gib Frid in proportion of 4/1 blade / hilt. Configured with the usual taper distal for this swords. The grip is made of leather lined with leather, finished in silver wires and topped by a fishtail pommel with floral ornament chiseled with silver inlays. The scabbard is made of wood covered in leather embellishing with chiselled Italian Renaissance garnish, made according to techniques of the time. The total weight is 1,400 grams. Total length: 123.5 cm Blade Length: 93 cm Balance point: 14 cm from the cross Percussion point: 66 cm from the cross Blade width on the defense: 5 cm Note: The fishtail pommel has a slight clockwise rotation of a few degrees product of the deviation when riveting the spike on the pommel. The photos are taken by a photographer friend. I hope you like it as much as we like it. thanks for watching
  17. 9 points
    Hello: Just finished this one for book IV...what a nightmare this one was...the polish is deadly....cut myself a bunch of times but double edges can get yas.. Still it turned out OK I guess.. Not too bad for a broken down old man.. blade length 13 3/4"...1095 and L6 laminate... This one could really benefit from a pro grade polish.. A bunch of stuff going on in there... Hope the photos work JPH
  18. 9 points
    Hey guys! Here is a knife I made as a gift for William Short, the leader of Hurstwic, as a thank you for inviting me to Iceland on an iron making expedition this summer. We went and created iron for the first time since the 1250's in Iceland, after Norway forced them to start importing iron instead of making it. There are however, about a bazillion (scientific term) iron rich streams and bogs in Iceland, and naturally occurring Kaolite, plus many archaeological sites where a lot of iron was produced, such as Eidar where ~1000 tons of iron were produced over about 300 years. Added to the fact that there are other sites where bloomery furnaces are found, on farms with an iron rich stream nearby, and where forest used to be, on a body of water connecting to or on the ocean, it seems iron production and export was very common in Iceland. Bill first got interested in all of this after seeing Eidar, and after some experimenting at home it was time to go. I'll probably post something more about that trip in the bloomers and buttons forum or something, but at any rate! He was kind enough to bring me in as a consultant during the experiments and learning at home, in preparation for the event in Iceland, and he invited me to go with them. As a thank you, I wanted to make him something in the style of what an imagined settler of Iceland could have carried. We had a feast in the reconstructed longhouse of Eirik the Red and gifts were given, which is when I presented this secret gift to him! Without further ado, here's the photo essay! One of the bloomery furnaces we ran at Bills house during the year of prep for the festival. The actual material for his knife came from maybe the second or third smelt I believe. A small collection of the bloom we had made over the year, sliced up into easily workable sections for forging. Most of it was steely bloom as opposed to iron, so this particular material needed a bit of extra careful folding and forging. I chose a piece I liked the look of and began to fold it. Two folds in! Looking surprisingly good considering the nature of this material. Some nice sparks from the bar 6 folds in. After 5 more folds (total of 11) it was ready for forging. I forged and ground the blade quickly and then hardened it in water. You can see the artifacts of hardening, which will be visible in the final product. Skip forward another 6 hours or so, and you have a finished knife! Sitting on a piece of bloom and a chunk of boxwood. I started designing some carvings based off a Norwegian church carving. I designed on the sheath in pencil and then began the carving, the entire process from starting the design to finished carving took maybe 2.5 hours which I am very pleased with! I am beginning to feel more comfortable with these styles of decoration Half way there. Here I am about to complicate the knots on the right side of the sheath nearest where the leather strings will sit, and I chose to make some unresolved lines as well. Most of the period art I have seen seems to have some lines that don't quite go anywhere. I think this is wonderful, and wanted to add some of that into this piece. A shot in more natural light showing how well the stippling brings out the definition in the carving. And done! Aside from dye that is. The runes say who it was made by and for whom. I also added the grace lines, to visually complicate the knots. Above the runes you can see the extra knots I added that aren't resolved. It was definitely odd making the carving 'imperfect' but I quite like the result! Dyed! After a few minutes when it is dry you can buff with a paper towel or some other soft rag to brighten the high spots and matte the lower ones. And some finished shots/video! The second video shows the blade moving in the light a bit, showing the hamon. IMG_2066.mov IMG_2048.mov Anyway, hope you guys enjoy the knife! -Emiliano
  19. 9 points
    Some people might remember my first "Seax knife" that was actually a tanto... This is my second atempt, much better considering I sharpened the right side this time. My grandparents wanted something to display on the mantle, I thought this one would do nicely. The blade is 1080 and 15n20, with a brass guard, elk antler spacer with black fiber gaskets, and brazilian ebony. Overall length is 8 1/2", with a blade length of 4". I made this in master bladesmith Audra Drapers shop, under her close supervision. Hope you all enjoy.
  20. 9 points
    A recent piece of work. A pattern welded tomahawk with a 5 bar construction with each bar having 14 layers. The cutting edge is approx 500 layers. The edge is 2 1/4" and the head is 6" long.
  21. 9 points
    Some quick iPhone pics to prove it so I can finally say this project is DONE! Summer gets crazy busy with almost no shop time but I eked out enough time to put on the finishing touches. I think I’ll try to get some good pictures and then these go to the intended recipients. Without further ado: Pretty proud of the result. Quite a few things I will tweak on the next go around. Always room for improvement. Hope you all enjoyed the WIP. Adam
  22. 9 points
    Hello!! Here are a few pieces I whipped out this last week or so....yes I committed forgery! All are hilted with some of my Bovine Ivory (I love using that stuff..very nice material when done right)... Pic heavy so...with out further adieu ..away we go!! JPH
  23. 9 points
  24. 9 points
    I didn't get in much shop time today but did manage to get the first of eight dogwood flowers roughed out. These will all get inlaid side-by-side into a billet of 1084 using a canoe & 1084 powder.
  25. 9 points
    Here's my finished Arkansas Toothpick/Dagger: Custom Damascus, stabilized mastodon ivory bark, 416 stainless w/blade steel inlays:
  26. 8 points
    Hello, I want to show you my latest project. This Falchion is inspired by 14th century originals. Specifications: - length 80,5 cm - blade length 64 cm - blade width at crossguard 3,9 cm - max blade width 5,35 cm - weight 1051 g - CoB 9 cm - nz3 steel -copper inlays on the pommel - wood and leather scabbard - brass handmade buckle and strap ending
  27. 8 points
  28. 8 points
  29. 8 points
    All done except for the leather work. I heat blued all the stainless fittings except the guard.
  30. 8 points
    Hi all. So this is a knife my uncle commissioned from me for my cousins graduation. Steel is 5160, brass hardware, African blackwood handle. All on a through tang (but not take down) construction. And yes, the thickest "blocky" handle was intentional. My uncle "likes them chunky", his words not mine all in all, it's very comfortable in hand, indexs fantastically and my uncle is thrilled with it. Thoughts and critique, as always, are welcome.
  31. 8 points
    I've had this chunk of meteorite laying in my shop for some time and decided it's time to use it. I've made two blades from this chunk already. I'm not sure just what type of blade I will make from it but that's still a long way off. There are two things that you must keep in mind when working a meteorite. One is that they have no carbon content so you must weld them to steel that has too much carbon in order to sacrifice some of it through migration in order to end up with a billet that will harden then way that you want. For this one I'm welding it to two pieces of W1 steel which has 1.05 C. Also you must remember that most meteorites are very "red short". This means that you must do most of the forging to the blade after welding it between two pieces of steel so that it can't crumble & flake off. This is a chunk of "Campo de Cielo" meteorite. It is 92% iron & 8% nickel.
  32. 8 points
    Scottish Dirk, 318 Layer pattern welded, sterling silver fittings with Bog Rata handle, I did use some black dye to get the wood a bit blackerTotal length 47 cm blade 33cmI still have to make the scabbard.
  33. 8 points
    My fencing coach never taught me that parry. I suspect that particular technique was forgotten because it generally sucked.
  34. 8 points
    I finally bowed to the peer pressure of a friend and made him a chef knife. It is 88 layers of 1080 and 15N20 laddered with a bronze bolster, black G10 spacer, and a pretty stabilized Redwood burl handle. Caleb Royer did the picture. Anyhow, here is it. Let me know what you think gentlemen.
  35. 8 points
    I have been playing with patterns...I took an iron jewelry class with Janos Gabor Varga earlier this year ( a great class) and it got me thinking about some patterns...a bit of experimentation and a few cockups later this came along! Helter skelter pattern... what do you recon?
  36. 8 points
    Finishing this up for a friend. She wanted a seax with some Japanese flavour, and this is what I came up with. 7 1/2" blade, 1" wide and 1/4" thick at the break, 13" overall. Sculpted copper blade collar, buffalo horn fuchi and kashira with copper accents. Carved walnut handle in a take down construction secured by a copper pin. The blade needs a light buffing to brighten it, and I need to finish the sheath tomorrow, so I'll try and get some better pics then... let me know what you think...
  37. 8 points
    I have been playing with feather patterns recently, started up looking at illerup idal blade fern patterns and later evolved to a feather pattern , trying to get a stand alone feather...Its been fun. and has lots of spin offs running in my mind. firy , flamy frondy stuff!
  38. 8 points
    I've been wanting to make one of these for ages and finally got around to it. The body of the knife is made from 2mm thick copper sheet which I've beaten and filed the top then applied liver of sulphur to patina the surface. The blade is made from Shiro 2 with a white paper steel core, blade thickness is 3mm, blade length is 75mm, that's cutting edge, overall length of the knife is 186mm and the closed length including the flipper is 135mm. I've called her Tombo, dragonfly, I hope you like her. Thank you for taking the time to look guys and all comments are really appreciated. Steve
  39. 8 points
    I wanted to share some photos from a recent hearth steel experiment we ran. The setup replicated how Emiliano has been producing hearth steel. Our protocol may have been slightly different: Input: Mild Steel (1in x 1/2in x 5/16in) and charcoal (1in pieces) 7 charges (150g mild steel + 400g charcoal). 1 charge every 4 minutes. One additional charge of 400g charcoal. Output: ~950g of high carbon stuff Here are some pictures of the setup: 7 Firebricks standing up; 1in tyuere at roughly 3/4 the height of a firebrick angled slightly downward. In action video Extracting the puck. After quick consolidation on the power hammer. Spark test. Looking good. Knife after heat treatment. Unfortunately, I made the tang transition below where I forge welded some mild steel. Oops.
  40. 8 points
    Not exactly blades, but they have edges and points so I thought they might still be of interest. I needed to make a new set of arrows for myself (I am making 24 but these are the first 8) that I didn't mind shooting and that I knew would hold up. I had made arrows before, but never forged my own points and never forged a socket before so this has been valuable practice. The heads are hardened and burned in. The shafts are barrel tapered port orford cedar spined for a 50lb bow, stained and sealed. The nocks were reinforced with ebony wedges. Turkey feather fletching with artificial sinew spiral wrap. Overall I am pretty happy with the first batch, though I definitely learned that I need to make the sockets a bit wider than it seems I should while forging.
  41. 7 points
    To celebrate my Christmas time off, I forged two seaxes from bloom (iron and steel). I smelted the steel (right, in the photo above) back in March from powdered hematite ore ("Spanish Red"). I helped Mark Green and Daniel Cauble make the iron (left, above) at an SCA event in October, using Mark's "easy ore" (NC limonite). Mark and I, feeding charcoal and ore into the smelting furnace: First, I had to compact the iron bloom into a bar: After doing the same to the steel, I forge welded the two together into a billet for the two blades: I decided to copy two 6-7th century seaxes from a cemetery at Finglesham, Kent (UK): I cut the billet in half and forged the blades (also, a chef's knife from 1075): Lots of grinding... ...and ready to harden! Water got them hard enough to skate a file on the first try, so I didn't have to resort to brine this time. They came out blessedly straight, which is never guaranteed with bloomery steel. And the patterns started to show! 9 hours of hand sanding later (up to 1500), they're ready for a ferric bath. Etched: For the handles, I used horn (like the originals). And, finished! The seax on the left is 35cm long; on the right 37cm. I set the iron perpendicular to the blade's edge when I welded the billet, so the folds show as stripes on the sides of the blade's spine:
  42. 7 points
    Best I can do for today! Needs more grind work, sanding, and heat treatment. I just couldn't resist getting an etch on it before shutting the shop up.
  43. 7 points
    Hi all, i don’t usually post work, at least not often. With the last KITH, I was inspired to do a couple of folders. Have not tried slipjoints for a long time and it felt good for a change. The first one is a coke bottle with nickel silver and blood wood. Yes my logo is too large and I am ordering a smaller stencil. I have a young grandson who has a birthday late November so this one goes there. The second one I really like, as I had a couple of small slabs of fossilized mammoth tooth for years. I think I got these at the Blade show, can’t remember. Being super careful not to crack or burn this stuff, the slabs are one. Pretty to me anyway. Nickel Silver bolsters. One pin is not nickel silver as I wanted to keep the pin smaller. Both blades are angled downward in the open position, so I need to work on that. But still functional and with snap.
  44. 7 points
  45. 7 points
    I see all you responsible adults managed to avoid making the very obvious joke that goes with this thread title
  46. 7 points
    Pattern welded Kitchen knife, 275 layer,Handle Bog Rata (NZ Native) capped with sterling silver bolster.Total length 33.5 cm, blade21 cm
  47. 7 points
    Hello Forum, Its been too long since I posted here ! - still pop in for a browse quite often though. Ive been fairly productive making wise (by my standards) for the last year or so, and seem to be finding my groove with chefs knives. I have a strong bias on the forging of the blade, and forging as much geometry into them as I can, I am finding my way with grinding and handles, but a bit of me still views them as necessary evils so I can do more forging! This is one of the last ones I have done, the cladding is about 80 layers of wrought iron, mild, and bandsaw blade, over a core of Takefu Blue paper steel. This one has got a pure Ni barrier layer as well. The handle is Bog Oak.
  48. 7 points
    I thought it would be advantageous to have a thread to reference for the benefit of beginners (or anyone under equipt). In this we are only going to look only at our beginner safe steels. Being that I am highly underqualified to direct anyone on metallurgy, correct me at will, and add what you think, or any questions! First up; steel selection . What makes a beginner safe steel? The answer is to keep it simple. A general rule of thumb is the less complex the steel; the less complex heat treatment is (with exceptions). High chromium steels who's carbides require long soak times in order to get into solution are not safe for beginner's. However, Alloys like 5160 with a moderate amount of chromium are easy for beginners to use and are a fan favorite for its attributes such as toughness, wear resistance, and edge retention alongside harder to heat treat steels like 1095. Alloys like vanadium can actually help keep grain size small. Manganese can have an effect on the depth of hardness. Low manganese steels are shallow hardening (use for hamons) and classified as a water quenched steel (don't try water). Higher manganese steels are deep hardening and classified as an oil quenchable steel (definitely don't try water). A lower-high range of carbon content (.75-.84%) can use a slower speed quenchant (such as 120°F canola oil) and are less sensitive to overheating. So our favorite begginners steels are: From the 10xx group: from 1075, 1080, and 1084. Unrelated to those; 5160, 80crv2, 15n20. How to work these steels There is no doubt some will want to try forging a blade. Anything heat wise you do to a blade is a part of its heat treatment. These steels need to be forged at what I see as a high orange color to a mid orange color. To me, red is around 1,100°F- 1,300°F. Don't forge anything more than to straighten a blade at this heat. You want to be at a temperature of around 1,900°- 1600°F for forging. This can be tricky to go by. Some claim the steel is "cherry red" others claim it is yellow or orange. We all see it differently. Normalization It is next, but not until we learn the big word below. Decalescence "De"as a prefix means "to be away from", or "without" and "calescence" means "to warm up" in Latin. So, "decalescence" means (roughly) "to be without warming up". Since energy is matter, and matter is energy; the steel will release light and heat energy When heated. When you heat the steel to a certain point, the steel begins to change its atomic arrangement. Such a change requires energy to accomplish, so the steel cannot emit its light energy, and heating may slow down. This creates a visible "shadow" in the steel that can be used as a waypoint in the normalization and hardening processes. Recalescence is the same thing as decalescence but in reverse. So you see it as the blade is cooling. Here's a video by our own @Wes Detrick (hope you don't mind Wes ). For a closer look, I'm gonna quote the guy who explained it to me in another thread; Alan Longmire. (On recalescence)- "It's not heat, nor is it grains. It's photons and individual crystal structure. When the crystal goes from face-centered cubic to body-centered cubic it takes energy to accomplish, thus the momentary darkening. It does not cool off (much), and when it brightens again after transformation is complete it is because the photons are being emitted again rather than absorbed. Exactly the same thing happens in reverse (decalescence) when you heat it up. The swirling shadows you see are the crystals transforming from body-centered to face-centered, absorbing energy. This is the dimming via lack of photon release, it is not cooling off. We're in the realm of subatomic phenomena here; where visible light is due to electrons jumping up or down one step in energy level, releasing or absorbing photons in the process. Matter is energy and energy is matter, light becomes solid and vice-versa. E=mc^2 and all that. Grains are just groups of crystals growing in the same alignment, not unlike quartz crystals. You can have big ones you can see or tiny ones you can't, but that make up a large mass anyway." Remember, decalescence happens on a rising heat; recalescence happens on as it cools. Think of it this way, using "re" before a word usually means its the second go around. Recalescence is the second shadow. Back to Decalescense So, if you couldnt make sense of that; the steel darkens or forms a "shadow" at the temperature right before you would be ready to quench. You continue to heat the steel until the shadow brightens until it becomes the same color as the area just outside of the shadow. You want to heat as evenly as possible until the shadow is gone. Heat thicker areas first, and then move to thinner areas. I pull my blade in and out of my forge's hot spot to achieve even heat. Some use a pipe capped on one end inside of the forge to create an even heat. This phenomenon is best seen in low light conditions and is used for both normalization and hardening. Normalization continued We're going to skip annealing as I see it as unessesary and difficult for a beginner to accomplish. To soften the steel for stock removal and drilling as well as grain refinement prior to hardening; we normalize. Using decalescence, we typically (using these beginner steels) run 3 cycles to refine grain after forging or annealing. To do this, you take the first heat a little above "critical" (the point after decalescence) and let cool in still air until no color is left. I typically quench in oil at this point, others like to wait until it's just about cool enough to grab. Then, another heat is taken to right at critical temp and then allowed to cool in still air. Lastly; the blade is taken to a dull red heat and allowed to cool in still air. Note: if this project was taken to welding heat or fully annealed more cycles of normalization won't hurt. I typically do 3 sets of each cycle above. Hardening This is just about the same as the second step of normalizing with the addition of quenching. The above steels can all be heat treated using canola, or peanut oil. You'll need to heat the oil in a metal container to around 120°F. I judge this as uncomfortable to hold my finger in for more than a second. If you wanna get fancy; buy a meat thermometer. Scrap metal can be heated and dunked in the oil to heat it. Have your oil warm and just a step away. Heat your blade to critical, and without lollygaggin, put it tip first into the oil and make slight cutting motions through the oil with the blade. Wait 12 seconds to pull it out. Any warps you have can be fixed in the temper. Tempering This is what softens the brittle blade and should be done immediately after hardening. The right temperature for tempering should be decided with the design of the blade in mind. A blade with a lot of force and leverage applied to a robust edge should be tempered hotter for toughness. A chef's knife might be left harder to maintain an edge longer. This is a compromise between toughness and edge retention. You can temper in a toaster oven, a conventional oven, or even a real tempering oven. If you choose a conventional oven or toaster oven, use a meat thermometer to measure heat. Most ovens are out of calibration, and have temperature swings. To combat this; use a heat sink such as a tray of sand, or a firebrick. Flip the blade each cycle. The cycles should be one hour minimum for 3 cycles minimum. I do three 2 hour cycles. Leave it alone for one cycle, take it out, and quench in water. Repeat that until you are done. The point behind cycles is: When you harden a blade; you heat it to critical which forms a grain structure called austinite. The austinite is converted to martensite when quenched. Some austinite is left. Retained austinite turns into untempered martensite while tempering, so you temper in cycles just to try and get everything tempered. Now you're done!
  49. 7 points
    Made this one a few months ago. Blade is 10" and forged to shape from a billet I made with a centre core of 80CRV2 and 15N20/1084 mix. Guard is stainless, handle is African blackwood, pommel is low layer damascus. Thanks for looking. Clint
  50. 7 points
    After posting asking for help and advice in making my first knife (and realising I was in way over my head), I have finally finished it! Yes I have made mistakes along the way, and it took far longer than i could have ever guessed, but all that aside I am super pleased with how this has turned out. It has been a very steep learning curve, and now I want to do it again... Thanks to everyone who contributed to my original plea for help. I couldn't have done it without your input! Adam
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