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  1. 16 points
    “Far over the misty mountains cold, To dungeons deep and caverns old, We must away, Ere break of day, To claim our long forgotten Gold the latest Seax by Myself and Petr Florianek... My blade but Petr has surpassed himself with the blade carving , handle and sheath ...My fave to date. hope you like it. [
  2. 14 points
    I have been working on the idea of this for a while...patternwelded inlay(ish) ...this is patternweld with sterling silver spacers and inlay/
  3. 14 points
    This is lhe latest colaberation knife made by myself and Petr Florianek. Inspired by saxon swords the 11" blade and handle are made by me and the carving and Sterling silver handle ornamentation is by Petr. going for the bling bling! Hope you like it.
  4. 14 points
    Forging the Blade The raw material for this blade spent most of the last century on a former homestead. A large portion of the steel was used for another blade, this was the piece cut from half of the left side. Slowly drying the clay for yaki-ire over the embers in the charcoal forge. After yaki-ire, an #80 grit Sun Tiger stone reveals the approximate hamon as the geometry is set. Habaki Habaki forged to shape in preparation for silver soldering in the charcoal forge. The habaki is textured with files and patinated using a blend of copper salts similar to rokusho. Ireko Saya A two part black buffalo horn (ura) and blond cow horn (omote) lock keeps the two halves aligned when joined. The omote half contains the edge entirely and has an oil collecting reservoir at the tip. The ura half does not contain the edge, keeping it entirely in the omote half. Kataki Tsuka & Saya The hardwood block is split and carved out to fit the ireko saya and the tang and then rejoined using sokui (rice paste glue). This wood is very hard on tools and they require frequent sharpening. Nori-urushi, a mixture of natural urushi lacquer and sokui is used to reinforce certain areas, particularly the koiguchi where the wood is thinner. Mixing the urushi and sokui along with a bit of extra water to help it cure inside the joint. It can take at least a month to fully cure nori-urushi inside a wood joint, more time is better for strength. After the nori-urushi is fully cured the tsuka and saya are shaped with kanna and smoothed with fine rasps and the horn mekugi peg is fitted. An antler crown and tip are used to form a very organic kurikata (栗形, a cord loop) and obidome (帯留, “belt stop”), usually called kaerizuno (返角, “turn-back horn”). The antler kurikata is fit to the saya using a carved sliding dovetail, with no room to spare! The kurikata slides in from one side and then tightens as it reaches the final position. The obidome has a tenon that fits into a mortise carved in the saya, again carved right to the ireko saya. The obidome/kaerizuno will be attached with sokui after the saya is lacquered. In preparation for lacquering, the open grain is cleared of dust using a stiff brush. Ready for fukiurushi, the thin layer of wiped on urushi will preserve the interesting surface texture of the wood. After the lacquer has cured the surface has become a rich, glossy dark chocolate colour. Polishing Once all the parts are made and fitted the blade can be taken through the final polishing stages using Japanese waterstones. The natural #700 used to remove the last of the arato/kongo-do stone scratches. Several stones later, hazuya and jizuya fingerstones made from flakes of uchigumori-do and narutaki-do koppa attached to washi paper with natural urushi are used to even the surface and add depth. This stage is very time consuming as is the uchigumori-do before it. The fine surface grain of the steel brought out by the uchigumori stone throws multiple colours in sunlight. Final Assembly A look at all the koshirae parts before assembly Antler kurikata and obidome attached using sokui and tapped into place with a small mallet. Inserting the ireko saya into the koshirae. Completed aikuchi koshirae. Furusato tanto forged from reclaimed antique steel. View of the spine with peaked iori mune. Macro detail of the interesting texture of the Tshikalakala wood pores.
  5. 13 points
    Blade: 1080 & 15N20 Handle: cocobolo Fittings: 416
  6. 13 points
    All: It's been about two years since the death of my father. He died unexpectedly and suddenly. Him and I were working on our jointly owned boat in Cordova, Ak and he got a stomach ache. A few days later he was diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic Cancer. Ten days later he died. We had a few days to say goodbye. The very last beer I shared with my Dad was sitting on the flying bridge of his Boat in what was going to be his retirement home in Florida. I asked him what he wanted done at his funeral. In my Dad's characteristic humor he said he wanted me to build a Viking ship and put him on it, pushing it out to sea. i laughed and said that I'd probably go to jail for that. Then we hatched this plan. My family are commercial fishermen from Cordova, Alaska. We lived on the water. My dad always hoped he was of Viking descent. He was intensely disappointed to find out we were not when DNA tests became available. I wanted to share these pics and the video with you guys (my brothers in craftsmanship), but it was too close to the event. It was too personal. Enough time has passed, and I think it's okay to show you what we did. I say "we," because this build was like a long goodbye to my Dad. He was the woodworker. I was the metal guy. I had never built anything more complex than a small cabin out of wood. I had a lot of long conversations with him during this build. Most of them were in the form of: "I know, Dad! But we don't have time to redo that bit. Your funeral is in like seven days!" My buddy Shane Harvey designed this scale model of a Viking Longship from blueprints obtained from the Copenhagen museum in Denmark in CAD and then cut the keel and ribs on his CNC plywood cutter. He also did the dragon head and the small shields with my Dad's initials (RS) on them. The cutting of the cedar planks (each one cut on a table saw by me), the glue up, etc. took almost 20 days of intense work. I totally underestimated the amount of time it would take. All the lessons I had to learn as I went . . . Just in time I had it stained, varnished, and loaded onto my truck for the ferry ride to Cordova. We loaded the boat up with things my Dad loved. Including the very first sword I ever made when I was 12 with his help (ground from a long file), his favorite hat, a jar of peanut butter (his favorite food), and a gin and tonic in a viking horn (not traditional, but it was his drink). And then we set it on fire. It burned until it swamped, and then we sunk it in a bay that he loved. Anyway, hope you like the build. It's not a blade, but I know you guys well enough to know you'll be okay with this off topic post. Cheers, Dave PS: Drone footage by Shane Harvey.
  7. 12 points
    First go at one if these, just too cool not to try. had some issues that were mostly as a result of rushing or not paying attention but I’m happy with it over all. Would like to make another with some twists and stuff. Inlay on the socket would be cool too but I only have so much patience! wrought socket and core, wrought and mild teeth, en42j and 15N20 edge.
  8. 12 points
    It only took 5-6 years. The blade is a two-core interrupted twist. The handle is sea cow bone, the fittings are about 2lbs of silver with niello inlay, and there are two opals set into the sheath, which is the same from front to back. The stand is black walnut.
  9. 12 points
    Hi all! After a long time I signed there because I made new knife which is available. It is small knife overall lenght is 22,5 cm, blade 10 cm and handle 12,5. Welded blade is forged from old, broken springs of agriculture machine and from the bearings. These springs I found unders old oaks on Kovalovec meadows. Guard is from patinated bronze and on handle is small patch of cow bone, which I found on the way to the Skalica hills. Last part I bought from my friend and it is Palisander Honduras burl wood. Hand sewn scandinavian type sheath with leather inserts in the blade part. Leather, knitted lanyard with small decoration from same wood as on handle. Price 370 USD with shipping. Paypal accepted. Contact on me: jakubpetras.noze@gmail.com
  10. 11 points
    hi everyone! Alright, so I'm spending somewhat of an eternity working on the sheath of this thing - so I've decided to post at least half of the thing... the knife itself. Let me present - Draumr Gripnir - the "Dream Grip" - with some unintended fingermarks and all! Blade in two bars of folded and twisted railroad steel, with a third bar (edge) of 15n20 and ferrier's rasps. Handle i copper, brass, camel bone and vulcanized fiber. The runes engraved in the brass reads "keep your blade sharp, but your mind sharper". The nut on the end really tested my skills as an aspiring "jewler". Anyhow - sheath and complete measurements to come. Needless to say, this is one heavy knife due to the massive materials in the handle. Sincerely, Alveprins.
  11. 11 points
    Finished another folder. Little bitty bugger, 2.5" / 63mm closed, 4.5" / 112mm open. O-1, brass liners, nickel silver bolsters and pins, ebony scales. Still needs an edge and some cleanup, but it's assembled.
  12. 11 points
    Hello everyone, The last month or so I have been working on a Damascus hunting knife with a stabilized beech handle. Since I am taking pictures for my Instagram account anyway, I figured it would be nice to post this on the ‘’old fashioned’’ forums as well. For this hunting knife I am going for a more traditional design than I would normally do, this is a ‘’simple’’ drop point hunter with a guard and hopefully a takedown handle. On this knife I really want to focus on my fit and finish, normally one of my weaker points in knifemaking. As I normally make historically inspired knives doing a modern knife comes with a lot of firsts and I have really enjoyed working on it so far. For instance: this is the first time I’m trying sweeping plunges, a takedown design or working with stabilized wood. I went through several different designs and did a lot of tweaking to get this knife exactly where I want it. Carbon tracing paper is a huge help in trying out different handle shapes. The blade material is 450 layer random pattern Damascus, the steels are O2 and 75Ni8. To test if the grind lines I’d drawn were actually possible I ground a test knife out of mild steel, the plunges turned out to not be as difficult as I had feared. The mild steel also made a great template to use when forging. Normally I would forge closer to shape, but I didn’t want to risk a stray hammer blow messing up my plunges. After a bit of grinding I heat treated the blade to +- 61 Hrc and tempered the spine and ricasso back with a torch, this gives extra toughness and also allows me to file in my tang shoulders very precisely. I tend to do most of my grinding post Heat treat, the O2 is deep hardening enough and with fresh belts there is not much risk involved. After the knife is ground, I start on the fittings, there is a guard and two spacers, the middle spacer is bronze I cast myself and the other is mild steel. The spacer assembly is held together with drilled and reamed pins, a bit of extra work, but it makes alignment very easy. A threaded piece is silver brazed to the tang, I made a bronze nut for it on my lathe to keep the entire assembly together. This allows me to pull the knife apart as many times as I want, when the knife is finished this will make re-finishing a lot easier also. The handle is made from spalted beech wood, this stabilized wood is very nice to work with, and just needs a buff to get to a nice shine. The only downside is that it really stinks when grinding. From here on it was a lot of boring polishing to get the surfaces good enough. The last thing is sharpening and making a leather sheath, and it is time to take some pictures with an actual camera.
  13. 11 points
    Finished this just this afternoon. Haven't put an edge on it yet, but just couldn't wait to show it off! Time for critiques.
  14. 10 points
    Antiquity and Early Middle Ages, axes. Four of the engravings are forged from old-welded iron.
  15. 10 points
    Finished this today. 10.5 inch blade forged from a 7 layer billet of bandsaw blade, horseshoe rasp and center core of chainsaw bar that hardened nicely. Guard is a scrap of 300 layer, spacer blade material, and buttcap an endcut from a radial pattern billet I made forever ago. Handle African blackwood. Through tang construction with a nut welded underside the buttcap to squeeze it all together. Had to try fullers after seeing Jason Knight grind them into an apocalypse tanto in one of his recent youtube videos. Thanks for looking, Clint
  16. 10 points
    I'm on day 27 of not leaving my property. Thank god I've got a blade project to putter with. Here is a blade I just finished grinding/etching. I started it up in Alaska last Summer and mailed it down to FL for the post heat treat work. Standard 1095/15n20 mix. Twisted crushed W's make up the alternating bars under the fuller. Edge bar is a san-mai type w/ a 1000 layer core and 200 layer wrapping. Some highlight stripes between the bars. More when the fittings and grip are applied. I'm not going to rush, however. It's the only blade I have to work on, so once it's done I'm stuck w/ just mowing the lawn and pushups for entertainment. OAL is around 16" Anyone recognize this blade shape? It may seem familiar. Grins, Dave
  17. 10 points
    Just finished this up. I'll try and get proper pics and say more about it at the weekend, but It's 1075+Cr, bogoak, steel, copper and silver: let me know what you think...
  18. 10 points
    I have made a few of these recently with riveted pivots but getting the action right is very tricky, so I have used a threaded pivot pin and nylon washers which has made a world of difference. Smooth as silk now. The blade is approx 3" and about 6 1/2" overall.
  19. 10 points
    All Finished I decided against copper spacers. I call this one "Smoke and Mirrors" I made it for my wife for Easter.
  20. 10 points
    Hello: Here is the first sword I finished in 2020...The blade is 1070..the Hamon.. well, I dunno what to call it... Togari Gunome maybe?? finished with temple lion motif fittings from my art foundry guys in Taiwan..They do a great job..yes they do!! Much better than an old ham handed reprobate like I could do..... Black samegawa under that black and gold Chevron Tsuka-ito that I adore.. This is another proto for book IV which is coming along splendidly even if I do say so myself.. The siya is black lacquer that I dripped/ "flicked" Testors model airplane paint (metallic gold) on and then sealed with 6 coats of hard, clear lac.. I got the idea from a siya that one of my friends down here showed me a while back...turned out non too shabby but there is still room to improve on that...I do know I need to find a better price on that stuff..it is $$$...Hope the photos work out... Note: This Hamon didn't turn out like I wanted.. I was going for more of a crashing/breaking ocean wave/surf sort of thing but that isn't what happened.. Like I have said before...Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted to.. Happy 2020... JPH
  21. 10 points
    I wanted to make a very traditional folder, something as traditional as quaffing mead, boar hunting, getting into a long boat and raiding the coastlines of Europe. So I designed and made a pocket seax. This is the second one, the first had the thicker, more rounded handle of a fixed blade seax, so I decided to trim the handle down while retaining a bit of a rise towards the end. This one is 4" long from bolster to the end of the lanyard loop. I am thinking of doing a smaller, 3 1/2" version as well. SAE1070 blade and spring, Brass bolsters and liners, pink ivory scales. I did the carving on the bolsters. Questions and comments welcome!
  22. 10 points
    How to Carve Netsuke and Miniature Sculpture: Free PDF Download This is a link to a detailed 361 page instruction book on how to carve netsuke and miniature sculpture. The file is in Adobe Acrobat PDF format.

It requires Adobe Acrobat Reader http://sterlingsculptures.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Carving_Netsuke.pdf
  23. 10 points
    For many years now I was business partners with Peter Swarz-Burt and watched him making wootz . I learned a ton from him over the years. Well Peter left the shop last June,moved to HI infact. After peter left I got an order for a wootz knife . There were a few bars laying around I could use so I took the job.. the bars failed .. so I began my dissent into wootz making . This is the first piece completed from My wootz
  24. 9 points
    This type of blade construction was rather common in early medieval in central and northern Europe during Viking age. The blade consists of three parts: high carbon steel on the cutting edge, a twisted pattern-welded bar in the middle, and a simple pattern-welded bar on the back of the knife. To forge it I used a scrap metal (as usual in my projects) but this time the scrap metal was very special. I used old bloomery iron and wrought iron nails/bolts/rivets which were found in the Dziwna River in Wolin in the place of the old shipyard/harbor during the building of the new marina (Wolin is the historical site (Viking age city)), every new investment must be supervised by archeologist. This was also the case here but they were not interested of nails :-), so I collected it.
  25. 9 points
    Hi all, I have just joined here but been reading and browsing for quite a while. I've been making knives for around half a year now, with this being number ten (and eleven), but this is my first big one that isn't a simple little eating knife so wanted to share. This is 15th/16th century German style Bauernwehr, I say style as it is not copied from anything in particular and i'm sure there will be something i have not done quite right, but I hope it looks the part. I have done this as a three piece set in the manner of medieval hunting sets, so there is a little byknife and pricker too. The blades are forged from 1075+cr (bauernwehr) and 1080 (other two), with mild steel fittings and yew handle scales. The sheath is multi pocketed to hold all three pieces, and has tooled vine decoration and a simple fabricated steel chape. The whole point of this was as an experimental learning process really so I tried to pick a knife with as many new things as possible. Probably took much longer than it should have done but I am pleased with the final result and lots learnt for the next one. Any critiques much appreciated as I am very new to this and finding my way a bit, I hope you like it! Cheers Alex
  26. 9 points
    I recently completed this as a retirement gift for the president of the company that I work for. 21 layers of 1084/15n20, 6.25" blade, black walnut handle w/ African blackwood spacer and mild steel fittings. He told me that whatever I made him would end up in his showcase that he has in his trophy room. Given the caliber of knives that he has in that showcase already, it really pushed me to get outside of my comfort zone with this build and take on things that I had never tried before.
  27. 9 points
    Blade: W1 Spinal Wrap: Damascus Handle: Desert Ironwood w/ Fossil Walrus Ivory Spacer Fittings: 416
  28. 9 points
    Finishing this up. Water quenched 1095 blade, copper guard plate, antler bolster with carved birds head cartouches , carved box burl handle, leather sheath: let me know what you think...
  29. 9 points
    My latest sword a patternwelded single edged viking with patternwelded fittings. hope you like it. stay safe out there.
  30. 9 points
    Hello.... For over 11 years I have been working on traditional Japanese edged weapon, specifically grinding and polishing blades and making rim of swords. I use traditional materials and their modern modified analogues. Forging and heat treatment of blades are done by my friend Dmitry, he is a professional blacksmith and gunsmith with experience over 10 years. Since 2016, i began making art knives, in the styles: cyberpunk / bio-mechanics, using some of the best materials and precious metals. I try to do all the work in the highest quality, studying new technologies and do various experiments with design. Showing my last work, just as interesting, I will show my later work ... Aikuchi "The Black Moon" Authors: Daniil Izotov / Dmitry Chebukin. Blade: steel 9xs, 305/30/5 mm (length with handle 45 cm, in sheath 49)traditional grinding / polishing. Frame: magnolia, epoxy enamel, silver, copper. Sageo cord, kara-kumi weaving style.
  31. 9 points
    Hi all! I hope you are well, here I bring you the second part of a work that began with Gib Frid, a sword that we showed earlier and that served as a school sword to perform Dark Sister. Dark Sister is a famous Valyrian steel longsword, one of two ancestral swords of House Targaryen. Not having Valyrian steel, we forged the blade in 400 layer of 5160 and 15n20 in an Oakeshott type XVIIIc designed geometrically as its sister Gib Frid in proportion of 4/1 blade / hilt. Configured with the usual taper distal for this swords. The grip is made of leather lined with leather, finished in silver wires and topped by a fishtail pommel with floral ornament chiseled with silver inlays. The scabbard is made of wood covered in leather embellishing with chiselled Italian Renaissance garnish, made according to techniques of the time. The total weight is 1,400 grams. Total length: 123.5 cm Blade Length: 93 cm Balance point: 14 cm from the cross Percussion point: 66 cm from the cross Blade width on the defense: 5 cm Note: The fishtail pommel has a slight clockwise rotation of a few degrees product of the deviation when riveting the spike on the pommel. The photos are taken by a photographer friend. I hope you like it as much as we like it. thanks for watching
  32. 9 points
    Hello: Just finished this one for book IV...what a nightmare this one was...the polish is deadly....cut myself a bunch of times but double edges can get yas.. Still it turned out OK I guess.. Not too bad for a broken down old man.. blade length 13 3/4"...1095 and L6 laminate... This one could really benefit from a pro grade polish.. A bunch of stuff going on in there... Hope the photos work JPH
  33. 9 points
    Hey guys! Here is a knife I made as a gift for William Short, the leader of Hurstwic, as a thank you for inviting me to Iceland on an iron making expedition this summer. We went and created iron for the first time since the 1250's in Iceland, after Norway forced them to start importing iron instead of making it. There are however, about a bazillion (scientific term) iron rich streams and bogs in Iceland, and naturally occurring Kaolite, plus many archaeological sites where a lot of iron was produced, such as Eidar where ~1000 tons of iron were produced over about 300 years. Added to the fact that there are other sites where bloomery furnaces are found, on farms with an iron rich stream nearby, and where forest used to be, on a body of water connecting to or on the ocean, it seems iron production and export was very common in Iceland. Bill first got interested in all of this after seeing Eidar, and after some experimenting at home it was time to go. I'll probably post something more about that trip in the bloomers and buttons forum or something, but at any rate! He was kind enough to bring me in as a consultant during the experiments and learning at home, in preparation for the event in Iceland, and he invited me to go with them. As a thank you, I wanted to make him something in the style of what an imagined settler of Iceland could have carried. We had a feast in the reconstructed longhouse of Eirik the Red and gifts were given, which is when I presented this secret gift to him! Without further ado, here's the photo essay! One of the bloomery furnaces we ran at Bills house during the year of prep for the festival. The actual material for his knife came from maybe the second or third smelt I believe. A small collection of the bloom we had made over the year, sliced up into easily workable sections for forging. Most of it was steely bloom as opposed to iron, so this particular material needed a bit of extra careful folding and forging. I chose a piece I liked the look of and began to fold it. Two folds in! Looking surprisingly good considering the nature of this material. Some nice sparks from the bar 6 folds in. After 5 more folds (total of 11) it was ready for forging. I forged and ground the blade quickly and then hardened it in water. You can see the artifacts of hardening, which will be visible in the final product. Skip forward another 6 hours or so, and you have a finished knife! Sitting on a piece of bloom and a chunk of boxwood. I started designing some carvings based off a Norwegian church carving. I designed on the sheath in pencil and then began the carving, the entire process from starting the design to finished carving took maybe 2.5 hours which I am very pleased with! I am beginning to feel more comfortable with these styles of decoration Half way there. Here I am about to complicate the knots on the right side of the sheath nearest where the leather strings will sit, and I chose to make some unresolved lines as well. Most of the period art I have seen seems to have some lines that don't quite go anywhere. I think this is wonderful, and wanted to add some of that into this piece. A shot in more natural light showing how well the stippling brings out the definition in the carving. And done! Aside from dye that is. The runes say who it was made by and for whom. I also added the grace lines, to visually complicate the knots. Above the runes you can see the extra knots I added that aren't resolved. It was definitely odd making the carving 'imperfect' but I quite like the result! Dyed! After a few minutes when it is dry you can buff with a paper towel or some other soft rag to brighten the high spots and matte the lower ones. And some finished shots/video! The second video shows the blade moving in the light a bit, showing the hamon. IMG_2066.mov IMG_2048.mov Anyway, hope you guys enjoy the knife! -Emiliano
  34. 9 points
    Some people might remember my first "Seax knife" that was actually a tanto... This is my second atempt, much better considering I sharpened the right side this time. My grandparents wanted something to display on the mantle, I thought this one would do nicely. The blade is 1080 and 15n20, with a brass guard, elk antler spacer with black fiber gaskets, and brazilian ebony. Overall length is 8 1/2", with a blade length of 4". I made this in master bladesmith Audra Drapers shop, under her close supervision. Hope you all enjoy.
  35. 9 points
    A recent piece of work. A pattern welded tomahawk with a 5 bar construction with each bar having 14 layers. The cutting edge is approx 500 layers. The edge is 2 1/4" and the head is 6" long.
  36. 8 points
    Hi everyone, Though't I'd throw this one out there... Finished it during my "summer vacation" - effectively canceled thanks to Mr. Covid-19.... Long story short though. I've got a colleague of sorts who has helped me quite a bit throughout my career, and as he is leaving due to retirement, I thought he'd need something for his future free time in the wild. I give you "The Knuckle" - which incidentally is his nickname through many years in the industry. Blade is in a san-mai lamination with tool-steel for the core, and the folded steel is a mixture of tool-steel and jet-engine super-alloy which I've yet to identify. Handle is in buckeye burl, with copper bolster, brass and vulcanized fiber spacers. I decided to leave the blade a bit "raw" as it were, as this colleague of mine is both rough and sharp. I thought it fitting that the blade reflects his personality. Only thing that I am not satisfied with is the placement of the plaque on the sheath. It feels... I don't know... "out of place" to me... But.. lesson for the future I guess. A current knife I'm working on has a similar plaque in the middle of the sheath, although in that case I've made the sheath symmetrical even though the knife itself is single edged... Oh, and I decided to put my "logo" on the butt of the knife in this case. I doubt my etching would have penetrated the scales left on the body of the blade. The logo is basically my initials engraved into the wood and filled in with a copper-epoxy mixture. I am pretty happy with it. Anyhow, that's all for now. :) Chiao!
  37. 8 points
    A sad day. I finished this . . . no project to work on in quarantine now. So, the hell with this: I'm driving to Alaska. I start tomorrow. I just bought a 5th wheel camper and got diesel truck to tow her. Should take me 12 days. Wish me luck crossing the US/Canada border. They have closed it, but rumor has it they are letting Alaskan's through if they can prove they are residents. I'll post some photos. The handle on this one is copper, African Blackwood, moose antler, and more copper. Hope you guys like it. Dave
  38. 8 points
  39. 8 points
    Howdy again folks. Following along the same knife pattern as my most recent post, I've gone to my comfort zone and tried to create something clean, sleek, and classy. I think I did alright! Hope yall enjoy!
  40. 8 points
    Hello everyone !!! I hope they are well and are taking care of these difficult times. I want to show you this 17th century Spanish style rapier with an iron cup garnish, decorated with a mixed technique, engraved with pneumatic airgraver and opus interrasile (openwork work) with foliar motifs. It has a thin and straight blade, forged style, made of 5160 steel, two-sided, with two edges throughout. Wooden scabbard lined in black velvet with curb and brass tip. Total weight 900 grs Blade length 100 centimeters from the cup. 6.5mm at the fort and drops to 3m at the tip. the total length 117 Centimeters Balance point seven centimeters from the cup. it feels light and fast in the hand. hope you like!!!! best regards
  41. 8 points
    I often mention using alignment pins and a drywall screw to hold the handle piece together while finishing the handle off the blade. I just did a search and realized I never posted the technique on this forum. So here it is. My alignment pins are laid out in relation to the tang, and I purposely offset them in relation to both center lines so that there is only one way to assemble the spacer to the handle once it is made. (pretend this spacer is not shaped yet)Now, the drywall (DW) screw will not fit through that slot. So, you have to grind off the teeth on opposite sides of the screw to make it thin enough to pass through the slot.Hopefully, your slot in the handle is not much wider than the slot in the spacer, but if it is (like this one) you will need some wood shim material. I use thin pieces of cedar shims from Home Depot.Slide them down the handle slot (fat end first) and break them off. They should be loose in the hole, but wide enough to overlap center.Now put your spacers or spacers & guard in place using the alignment pins.Slip a couple of washers over the screw, (put a leather one against the guard face so not to scratch it up), slip the screw through the slot and in between the wood shims. Tap it down until it is tight against the face and give it a 1/4 turn. It will hold everything together tightly.
  42. 8 points
    There you go! Some hand sanding required and a forced patina after.
  43. 8 points
    And the pommel goes like this..... Take a piece of 1-1/2" round 416 bar and lightly forge it to shape. Surface the sides and cut out my profile drawing, super glue it to one face to rough out the shape. Set the height gage and mark a reference line for the tips at the curve junctions. Slot the bottom to fit the tang nice and tight. And get it fit to the tang.
  44. 8 points
    So it's about time for bi-yearly photo dump I mean to just post more often here and it never happens... so I apologize again for the flurry of photos that is to come, but hopefully you guys enjoy! I'll start with a smelt that Matt Berry and I did in January as a follow up to a previous smelt at Dragon's Breath that I ran for their yearly hammer-in. We used local iron sand from the beach a la Japanese and ended up with some really nice steel. I wanted to up the ante with the second smelt and built the furnace to provide a better yield (theoretically). It worked a charm! We charged 19.2 kg of ore and got 6.8 kg of steel out of it. A 35% yield! And not just any steel, it's as high quality as the tamahagane I have forged from Japan. At three folds it was already nearly flawless and forged like butter! So first is the bloom! We had to build the furnace in 16 degree weather and built a fire inside to mitigate freezing and cracking. The next day we fired it up and somehow managed to get the furnace through the whole smelt! That was a trial in and of itself. The aftermath of the furnace. This was how it ended up post extraction, the furnace fell during the night. Preliminary spark check! I didn't think the whole thing could be like this, but it certainly was. We had to heat it back up and cut it under the power hammer because it was too solid to cut by hand. Nice and solid inside! One half as is, and the other half forged out prior to any folding. First fold done! 3 folds... I forged a small replica of a knife Peter Johnsson had made and hardened it without clay to see what the steel would do. And success! Over 64 RC out of the water. This one is making its (overly complicated) trip to Peter now! IMG_5131.mov With success behind me, I decided next thing to do was forge a tango from the rest of the bar. I chose a Bizen school shape which I am drawn to and prepared the blade. This one still has a fair ways to go, it still needs a habaki and proper mountings. This is the first blade I'm happy enough with to give it the full treatment. There are a few things to change, like the spine it a little too tall, but that can be fixed! It has exceptional activities present in the blade and the hardening is actually pretty reminiscent of some Soshu work that must also have been done without clay! This one also reached over 64 RC out of the water and ended up nice and straight. For blades like this you introduce a downward curve during forging/normalizing so that the blade ends up straight out of the water, instead of curved, basically you're adding negative sori. IMG_5219.mov While we're still in forging territory, I played around with fire strikers while working on a sword blade for another project that will likely be posted soon! I made a top and bottom tool with some round 'teeth's forge the squiggly iron and then took some 1075 and folded it on itself. Afterwards a little flux! And presto! There was some grinding to clean up the ends afterwards, but not too much! I also cracked it during the hardening but it makes some nice sparks! I plan on making more of these soon, they're a greta shape to forge and will make a great addition to a viking kit! Jumping forward to the end of February I went down to NYC with some of the usual suspects and enjoyed the opening of Peter's amazing dedication to the goddesses! There was a lot of time spent at the Met enjoying some recent additions to the arms and armor gallery. From left to right the man of the hour Peter Johnsson, Owen Bush, Jordan LaMothe, Dakota Slack, and Rusty Griffin! And the group shot during the opening! Out of frame is Rusty but there's Jordan, Dakota, me, Sixt, Peter, Owen, Brett, Scott, Isabel, Michael, Zack and Rasmus. A rowdy group for sure! Jump forward a couple more weeks and I went to Maine to NESM for a seax class! Here you have Eric doing the initial forging of the edge billet we made. We folded to 480 layers of 15n20 and 1084. Man having access to a power hammer makes for fast work! We made a few different kinds of twist bars so students could choose what they liked! These twists are all based on historical Viking Age or earlier patterns. Cory doing some twisting! Most people assembled their billets from 4+ bars. Jay holding his monster seax! Once we had blades forged and cleaned up we hardened and tempered them overnight! From left to right is Jay, Matthew, Eric, Cory, and then two I made as different demos. I wanted to do bolster construction with these. I brought a moose antler that we divided up into small chunks for bolster making. Here I am fitting the bolster with a couple of drilled holes, a jewelers saw, and some needle rasps. This one was meant to be a through tang construction as a demo on making a seax with peened construction. And glued! Kind of... We bedded the tangs in the handle once things were fit up so that we could remove the blade during the shaping process to make sure everything was perfect. A shot of Cory doing the front detail on his bolster. A useful trick is to trace the blade shape with pencil before doing this so you can make sure things are staying even in case of a slightly uneven fit of the bolster to the blade. And finished! A class photo on the last day. From top to bottom, Cory, Eric, Matthew, me, and Jay! And some closeups! Cory's first Then Eric's! He used a sweet piece of steel made in a previous NESM course for the edge. Look at those nicely matched interrupted twists! And Matthews! And Jay's! What a crazy piece of work! Next up I was supposed to go to Germany in a few weeks time for the KNIFE show hosted by the Deutches Klingenmuseum. Of course, with recent world events that wasn't; going to happen! Though they did decide to keep the kitchen knife contest open! Basically the prompt was 'the perfect cooking knife', so here's what I came up with! I started with some oroshigane made with Pavel Bolf during Ashokan. I made a 7 inch Japanese style knife, a sujihiki. It was hardened with no clay into water using a technique called zubuyaki that I learned from Pavel. Once polished you can see all the fun stuff in the steel! Once the blade was finished it was time for the rest! I had a sudden thought while driving from the shop one day about how I should finish this up, but it seemed ridiculous. I haven't ever seen someone do something like this for a kitchen knife, so I figured it wouldn't hurt to try! Worst case scenario it doesn't work out! I decided to make a traditional style of handle, a D shaped grip, using iron, bog oak, and silver. First was making the tenon. The collar isn't round, it is forged oval, so I had to rough in the tenon and then clean up to match the ferrule by hand. Then file finished and inlaid using ten-zogan! Applying the patina, little by little. It is a forced rusting called sabitsuke. A little bit of fussing and assembling and you have a finished knife! Next is a slightly older project that recently found a new home. It was a collaboration with Jordan LaMothe. He made the blade and sent it my way for finishing. I choose some dark dreamlike themes based the blade, kind of light a 'starry night' with fewer stars! Seeing these two one after another actually makes me realize there's a lot of common motifs between these pieces I've made lately. Well to be honest you can't go wrong with bog oak and silver! Next we come to the most recent couple weeks, the quarantine! My job has me working from home 30 hours a week (my regular schedule) so I've been doing a lot of bladesmithing related work at home as well, just because I'm already there! So I have jumped headfirst into some sheath work and other various projects that needed finishing. First off, a hairpin for my girlfriend for her birthday based off an original from somewhere that's escaping my brain at the moment... Carved from cow bone with a garnet in a silver bezel. Next is a couple of sheaths made for some knives, the zoomorphic one for the seax made at NESM and the other two for some other pieces! The one on the left is for a seax Luke Shearer made and sent to me for finishing, and the rightmost is for a piece made from bloom I just finished recently. And now dyed! I finished out the black one with silver rings and silver fittings. The blade is made from bloomery steel for the edge, high and low carbon iron and steel for the twist, and an iron spine. The bolster is finished the same way the ferrule of the kitchen knife was. I am super happy with how this one turned out, and honestly may just keep it for myself! Next one is the sheath for the demo piece from the NESM class! Based on the sheath fittings of a broad seax I found in some archaeological PDF! The tooling is based on some zoomorphic art from the Viking Age. The two together. A pretty handsome pair I think! Next a little guy made from some unknown antique tool steel I found at my old shop. Hardened with no clay as is becoming my custom. The carving is rough but a good step towards making decent carvings! I got some really fantastic help from Jeff Helmes in regards to carving better. A garnet is inset in the handle in a silver bezel. I'll probably make a simple sheath for this one and use it as a letter opener Some cool cloudy activity in the blade. And last but not least the most recent one! I made this one yesterday. I'm getting pretty quick at this! Pretty proud of myself, the whole handle and assembly took me about 5 and a half hours! Made from the same billet as the zoomorphic one. It's based on a German seax from the 6-7th century. The fittings are mild steel with diver salvaged white oak for the handle. It has a very nice flat profile for the handle as is evinced by the shapes of the front and back plates on these seaxes! The peen on the back end is ground flat and polished again. The handle actually feels really good, the narrow section fits in the crooks of your hands really well! The blade is etched deep for really nice chatoyance, and shows a nice hamon in the right light. And a 'family' shot showing a bunch of them together! Anyway, as usual, my profuse apologies for the 100,000 photos and the book of text, but hopefully you guys enjoy! -Emiliano
  45. 8 points
  46. 8 points
    Well here it is all done, I am happy with how this turned out in the end esp since it is my first sheath of this type and also my first go at leather tooling (thanks Josh). I have a confession....I had become a bit stale and board with making knives and I feel this has lit a fire again and inspired me to delve into the artist within me. I am really looking forward to my next project which will be a sheath for my pattern welded broken back seax. I also got some 90cm lengths of 15n20 and 1075 so this year I hope to get creative with my blades too. Thank you to all who have come along for the ride and for those who have posted invaluable info throughout this forum esp in history. Anyhow it is Friday night in Australia and I am about to crack a beer and light the BBQ. looking forward to any feedback etc. Oh...one more thing. I would appreciate any info/suggestions on your preferred suspension for this type of sheath as it might very well see active service on my bow hunts.
  47. 8 points
    All done except for the leather work. I heat blued all the stainless fittings except the guard.
  48. 8 points
    Hi all. So this is a knife my uncle commissioned from me for my cousins graduation. Steel is 5160, brass hardware, African blackwood handle. All on a through tang (but not take down) construction. And yes, the thickest "blocky" handle was intentional. My uncle "likes them chunky", his words not mine all in all, it's very comfortable in hand, indexs fantastically and my uncle is thrilled with it. Thoughts and critique, as always, are welcome.
  49. 8 points
    Scottish Dirk, 318 Layer pattern welded, sterling silver fittings with Bog Rata handle, I did use some black dye to get the wood a bit blackerTotal length 47 cm blade 33cmI still have to make the scabbard.
  50. 8 points
    My fencing coach never taught me that parry. I suspect that particular technique was forgotten because it generally sucked.
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