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  1. The blade here was made from six bars of irregular layers of 1080 & 15N20. The two in the center were twisted less(both left & right handed) than the top & bottom pairs, stacked and then welded like a Merovingian or Turkish pattern. I think that it gave it a very distinct and unique pattern. The handle scales are mastodon with fittings of 416 & some diagonally coin edged nickel silver with a guard forged from a bar of A36 & hot blued in 500 degree salts.
    12 points
  2. I recently finished something that would be nice to show here. I actually started this knife in june last year, this is the longest I've ever worked on anything. I actually started as a relaxing blade to make for myself between commission work, but it fought me every step of the way, and turned out to be super difficult to make the way I envisioned. As I was finally making some good progress I decided to move out of my parents house and go live on my own, it is super exciting but left me with little time to work on knives. Sadly I can't forge at my own place,
    10 points
  3. 3 is the number thou shalt count! been busy with some wildlife photography But made these for a friend just because I can...
    10 points
  4. This one has been on the books for a little while and it's rather poignant that I've got to do this Bowie just after the legend that was Bill Bagwell has unfortunately passed away. The original style that I call the San Antonio was based on the Bagwell Hell's Belle Bowie. The blade for this knife is made from W-1 high carbon tool steel, it's 258mm - 10 1/8" long, it is 5.5mm thick on the spine and the blade flats have a brushed satin finish. The overall length of the knife is 390mm - 15 5/16" and the clip has been sharpened. There are three coined nickel silver spacers and the forw
    9 points
  5. I had a small piece of low layer count 1095/15N20 leftover from a knife I made years ago. I squared it up, twisted it, and forged this scissors. My scissors usually have a cutting edge welded onto a mild steel body, so this one presented some problems for me. It took a lot of force to align the blades. I tried to keep the shanks out of the quench, but I don't think I was entirely successful. I sharpened the blades before etching, but the edge is pretty rough after. I decided to post pictures of it like this because it shows the contact point between the two blades. There's a bright
    9 points
  6. 9 points
  7. Finished these up in the last few months and thought I would share. 1 - Camp knife with a "bollo-ish" kinde of profile - ground from AEB-L with 2 tone G10 2 - Clip Point hunter 5" blade of chainsaw/1084 powder, blackwood spacers and mule deer crown 3 - Loveless style hunter in feather damascus and elk antler handle. Thanks for looking, Clint
    8 points
  8. I don’t typically forge much during the cold wet months as I do when it’s warmer, just can’t take the cold, (hands especially). Last October I took a seasonal job looking for part time work. During Thanksgiving week, woke up one morning and couldn’t raise my arm, turned out rotator cuff and long head bicep tendon were torn, so having surgery January 8th, I stayed in a padding sling for 8 weeks 24 hours a day. Now, (with PT), I am getting better. So that’s my seque in order to post stuff I’ve had to puts aside! I’ll post some of these here and there but bear with me, I don’t intend to hog
    8 points
  9. Hi. Recently I've finished a really exciting work. I've put it also on my blog: https://lipinskimetalart.blogspot.com/2021/04/brunewyrm-stream-serpent-wijacy-sie.html Brunewyrm – the owner named it like that and this means in old English “Serpent Stream”. The seax successfully landed in the owner's hands in Tennessee :) I forged the blade out of several elements: a serpent of 21 layers of soft and hard steel (S235 x 80CrV2) twisted in a classic “rope”. It winds between old fibrous wrought iron, and on the spine there is also a layered strip, but without twis
    8 points
  10. Here are two astrophotos that I took. The beauty in the night sky goes unrealized my most.
    8 points
  11. First time trying for an integral bolster. The blade shape is fairly unconventional... I'm not going to pretend that was all on purpose It's a very thin blade (for me anyway, distal taper to 1.4mm at the spine) and I let the heat get away from me at the grinder, so I had to do some re-profiling (it was originally wider and more triangular). It's growing on me though, and although I'm sure a chef would let me know in no uncertain terms why this is just wrong, cooking with it sure puts a smile on my face Mushrooms and parsley are my two favorite ingr
    7 points
  12. Several iron (but also flint, copper and bronze) tools, mainly axes, chisels from the first centuries of our era, based on bog finds from northern Europe.
    7 points
  13. Polished and etched.
    7 points
  14. Hi guys, I've been working on this little side-project for the past week - and thought I'd give a little sneak-peek. I've decided to go with a new makers mark for myself. This one is the first one of it's kind - and is in a deep relief with copper inlay. In the future all my makers marks will be 24k gold inlay. (still in the mail unfortunately...) Thought I'd give a shot at a dagger - and finished the blade in it's entirety today. about 40 hours work on the blade. (not including pattern welding. Had a bar lying around...) Have
    6 points
  15. Well,the title is more of a click-bait...In actuality what i'm shooting for here is an approximation of the work by an elusive and somewhat mysterious Swedish maker,Stefan Ronnquist. He produced a few heads for the wood-carvers' market some years ago,just enough to get them poor carvers all stirred up and aroused,and then kinda vanished,in spite of all the interest in his product. Unfortunately i don't know anything about the man himself,only that he reignited my own lust for that general shape. From photos of his work i want to say that he worked them up from a solid mon
    6 points
  16. Just a few quick phone photos of this one. O-1 blades, Nickel-silver guard, frame, pins, and large spacers around a smaller copper spacer. Stabilized and dyed giraffe bone scales. Blade is 7.125" long. 11.625" OAL.
    6 points
  17. This is a good example how vague plans have a tendency to go sideways I had made the blade with the idea of making a bushcraft knife. It's 15 twisted layers of C75 and 75Ni8. But rummaging through my wood shelf for something nice for a handle I remembered my box of boxwood and having recently gotten a set of fancy vallorbe needle rasps I had a sudden urge to try a barley twist. Let me tell you having nice rasps is amazing and they made short work of forming the handle. Hand sanding it smooth took a while though As this was turning out nothing like th
    6 points
  18. Hello! For a long time I posted nothing here. But recently made one sword with full finish and decided to share with you guys. This is replika of sword from Baltic, Curonian region. Full length - 68cm, edge - 56cm It is very light ~ 340g. Adomas S
    6 points
  19. Spent a couple of days making this for a friends kid. It's bubinga, about 3/4" thick, 26" blade including the integral habaki, 36" o/a. Steel tsuba, leather seppas, copper fuchi and kashira, with a couple of simple steel menuki. The fittings slide on from the end of the handle, so I bulked up the handle profile with laminated card before adding the wrap. The wrap is cotton ito, and it was a bit of a nightmare wrapping on a full length sword as opposed to just the tsuka, and I struggled to get it as tight as I would like. With that and wrapping onto bare wood instead of rayskin, which gives the
    5 points
  20. It’s been almost 3 years since I’ve touched anything to do with bladesmithing. An extended spell of poor mental health, somewhat kept in check by the creative outlet of forging came to a head after forging this blade for a friend nearly 3 years ago. I locked up my workshop and decided I needed to get away from everything so I built a camper and room a 4 month trip with my partner at the time only to find that on arriving home and moving in with her father ( we moved out of our rented house before travelling) I found that my mental health was in fact worse. The trip had taken a big to
    5 points
  21. Nice job on the handle, but the title pun is terrible!
    5 points
  22. Yesterday, I was sanding out file marks and scratches from coarser grit sandpapers. Today... <checks schedule> ... oh yeah: sanding out file marks and scratches from coarser grit sandpapers.
    5 points
  23. My elbows were acting up, so I decided to pick up a project for my daughter that I'd been thinking of just doing by stock removal. There's a lot I found that I would much rather have forged than cut/ground/filed... but hammer was just not a good idea this week. Basically, a cool looking if somewhat impractical fantasy dagger. I took one of my 3/16 bars of O1, put layout on it, and drew the outline out. I cut the rounds out with a carbide bit, angle-grindered where I could, and then used files to clean it up and cut in the bevels. I thought I took a
    5 points
  24. Today I made a habaki. Then I made another habaki. Tomorrow I'm making another habaki. Apparently I'm not very good at making habakis right. Good thing is I'll have several practice habakis for engraving before I commit to doing it on the real one.
    5 points
  25. Greetings fellows. Been a pretty rough couple of days, the kind of days that make good days shine. I came out to the hovel, flung the cap off a cold barley pop and fired up the forge with no plan. I used a scrap piece of 1084 that looked lonely and hammered out a blade shaped object that looked remarkably like my last knife.. doh. Used a stack of figured walnut bits that I was never quite sure what to do with and added a sheet of red brass. Some good rage draw filing and the blade was all pointy in the right places. A dive down the rabbit hole of drilling, filing, checking, repeat and this
    4 points
  26. I've got some progress to show again, I'm really enjoying myself with this one. the blade finish forged: The profile and flats ground before heat treat, and some filing done on the shoulders. I like to heat treat as soon as possible, this way I have room to grind out small warps and I like to do most of the work with 60 grit anyway. I never really understood why people grind knives to 220 grit before heat treat. And the knife finish ground ready for hand sanding, I also have a design now My plan is to use stainless for the g
    4 points
  27. Today I had a surprise free afternoon after work and I felt like forging instead of doing the things that I should be doing. I figured this would be the perfect time to start on this year´s Kith. So I rummaged around the shop and found an end piece of a Damascus billet, this billet is very low layer twist I originally made for Damascus rings, I have no idea if the pattern will look good on a knife, If it turns out ugly I will just start another. The billet was almost the right size so it wasn´t much work at all to forge it to a 1´´ x 0.5´´ x2 inch block.
    4 points
  28. Made some progress on @Dr Rays harpoon fighter today with all the work done pre heat treat now. I made a cutter to clean up the fuller from a piece of heavy spring steel and bent an old file to do the sanding.
    4 points
  29. Hey everyone! I’ve been bouncing around between forums trying to find a good one for me and I think this is it! I love the content here and everyone seems very respectful and helpful. So I’m excited to become part of the community! I started making knives through stock removal a few months ago and just recently got a makeshift anvil and other supplies to start forging. I’m really wanting to get into San Mai so I’ve been practicing just forge welding small three-layer billets. No forged knives yet.. but soon! Here are my two latest knives. My 9th and 10th I beli
    4 points
  30. I really shouldn't be left unsupervised . The dragon is 45 layers of 75Ni8 and 80CrV2 with a 23cm cutting edge and 53mm high at the heel. Starts at a chunky 5mm thick at the bolster and distal tapers to 1mm 2cm from the tip. Handle is of course ebony and brass. Thinking I really need to make a fancy sheath for it as well
    4 points
  31. A descent result for the day. Took them out of the clamps this morning and they are in the andle rack waiting for leather this afternoon
    4 points
  32. Possibly the final update, Owen and Tod have made a video about the sword. I'm sure it will be interesting to a lot of you!
    4 points
  33. Hi all Not been on here in along long time!! Yesterday I went to the bottom greenhouse to check on my overwintered Bonsai and saw two little furry fellas playing near the shed!, They ran and hid when they saw me but I stood still and they came back.. I couldn't get a pic as the sun was very bright behind me, I couldn't see the screen on my phone so I went in the greenhouse and snapped a couple of pics and a short video of them through the window! If anyone wants to view the vid it's HERE, It's only 11 seconds long! Cheers, John
    4 points
  34. @Jeroen Zuiderwijk posted this document in The Seax Files (a FB group). I have put it on my Google Drive for anyone who is interested. Get a copy while it's hot. I have changed the link and created a folder with several docs in it. I seems like a good idea to start storing these somewhere so folks can find them. Here is the new link with some other documents added. https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1XLVUFlDhZad92bmhjA10cLN-32d7hxpU?usp=sharing
    4 points
  35. Well I got it finally, and weighed it. 200lb, have it pictures next to my friends 75lb nc farrier for scale. Really a beautiful anvil. Going to cut a solid oak log trapezoidal for a base and router out for the feet. Use some horse mat or something and bolt it all together
    4 points
  36. Spent the day yesterday in the shed with a young lady who wanted to make a knife... her first ever. She made two! I didnt get into forging with her- just stock removal with a good sized saw blade steel. She designed two kiradashi style blades, cut them out, ground, and finished handles on both blades- with my coaching and help... but did most of her own work. Two completed, sharp blades in about 6-7 hours. Was a cool day. Don't mind my mess... been working on, and in the shed a bit.
    4 points
  37. So I got it operational. It really hits hard. It stands now on 4 pieces of wood not bigger than my palm, so I need to put something underneath. Also There are few small things to finish: 1) electric switch for the motor 2) To weld reinforcement on the square tube profile that is holding the guide assembly in its place 3) Cast the counterweight from lead and screw it on the back of the crank 4) Setup spanner for the pedal - the long shaft that is pulling motor needs to be adjustable. I m gonna use the same spanner like on the bones, just bigger diameter 5)
    4 points
  38. IMNSHO- Grinding the pieces across is much better than lengthwise, especially when you use flux. Flux will get in between the layers and you need to jettison it out when you hit it. The distance across is shorter than along the length, so the flux has less distance to travel and is less likely to get trapped. Far too coarse. You are asking for trouble by creating large grooves to trap flux. If the truth be told, I rarely grind my initial billets anymore other than cleaning any grease or marker off with acetone. Rusty pieces will get 100 grit sanding. With fresh clean
    4 points
  39. I started a new Damascus dagger project using low-layer count with thick layers of 1095 and 15N20. This is an end grain pattern, so I finished forging the billet, annealed it, and did my typical accordion cut. Some folks don' like the accordion cut method because it "wastes too much steel". I like the accordion cut because there is no visible seam between the pattern like you get with tiles. In the accordion cut, the pattern is continuous through the entire blade, In this particular billet, I cut it as close to a 45/45/90 right triangle as I could. You can
    4 points
  40. This is most elaborate trolling ever.
    4 points
  41. The local Dr is renovating an old home and yard here which had some 150year old Cypress trees that needed to come down and asked me to make a couple of knives with the cypress for handles. Of course the fresh cut trees were too wet to use but her last years firewood pile gave up a couple of dry blocks which I oven dried and stabilised before use. A 7 inch chef and a 5 inch general purpose kitchen knife will go to her at the weekend.
    4 points
  42. You have seen his ‘Interests’ under his profile pic? He’s not kidding
    3 points
  43. And made a simple sheath for it as well. Was tempted to make a belt loop for it because you never know when you might have to carve a steak or chop some onions
    3 points
  44. First time to finish an integral Pretty happy with it overall and ebony polishes up quite nicely
    3 points
  45. Some beautiful wood on the way. Spent some time (and lots of $) this morning selecting some lovely handle blocks. This is part of the selection with gold and dark Koa, box elder, spalted maple, and hickory burl among them. As always the pic does not really show the spectaculer colours and contrasts that is reveasled when it is in hand but Jason does short videos of the blocks I select, turning them in all directiosn so I can get a full picture of what is offered.
    3 points
  46. Well... that was fun. Just came in from shutting down the forge for the day. I think it was a good call. Have the new refractory to re-line her anyways. But, I cut, stacked, forge welded and cut my first "feather" pattern attempt. Remains to be seen how it holds up.
    3 points
  47. First, be sure the canola is heated to 130-150 degrees F to ensure it will harden the 1095. Put the blade straight into the oil edge-first, taking care not to tilt it to one side. You can move it lengthwise in the oil if you must, but never side-to-side. Give it about three or four seconds, then pull it out and check for warps. If it has warped, bend it back straight before it drops below around 450 degrees F. (wear heavy gloves), then cool completely, or at least to below 100 F. Water is fine at this point. Wipe the oil off and try to file the edge. Ideally, the quench will have blo
    3 points
  48. Let me see - One... Two... Five! Looking good Rob!
    3 points
  49. This one kind of started by accident. Had made two bars of low layer twisted C75 and 75Ni8 that I was planning to use for some hunting and camp style knives. I also had planned to use the time and hammer out a bauernwehr out of spring steel at the same time. So first bar ended up in a few knives then hammered out the bauernwehr and by that time I had completely forgotten what I was going to do with this bar of steel and all of a sudden I had a sword shape After some brainstorming I thought it might be a good idea to try something new so a hanger with some fantasy eleme
    3 points
  50. Having had an increasingly difficult time breathing over the last year and a half (not Covid related, thankfully), I decided to sell my coal forge and switch completely to propane. I made a coffee can forge last summer and that's been fine for blades less than 2" wide and that don't require forge welding. I decided to make a forge that would have 2 ribbon burners. I'm going to put a valve between them, so one can be shut off and have half of the forge chamber blocked off with a fire brick. The brick can either be slid over or removed completely to accommodate bigger blades or larg
    3 points
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