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  1. And here is the result. I'm pretty happy with it, taking into account that this is a learning piece. I've learned a lot, both about the original seax and the techniques learned to make the reproduction. Things I would change for the next one: correct the section profile, and change the cross hatched engravings near the hilt on the left side of the blade. That looks out of place. I'd als skive the edges of the leather even thinner. It was now about 0.2mm. And maybe try dyeing the leather with a natural dye. I'd also use a sandwich construction next time, with shear steel edge between
    13 points
  2. finished riveting up basket hilt attempt number three. Finally got one I'm pretty happy with. my original plan was to braze it after riveting, but honestly the risk/reward doesn't seem worth it...
    12 points
  3. This took quite a while, the blades on these are relatively simple but oh the ridiculous amount of small individually shaped pieces in the hilt add up in all there are 49 individually shaped and finished pieces in the sword Some time in the far far future I might hope to be able to do something even half as inticrate and detailed as the originals. They are just utterly mind boggling once you take a good hard look at them and how they are made
    10 points
  4. I did four hearth runs, all wagon tire scraps charge as one piece each, stuck vertically in the fire: I also decided to cook a steak! I was skeptical when I first heard of this method, but it’s not a crazy as it looks! No ash really stuck and it mostly just tasted like steak.
    8 points
  5. Here’s my take on a bird and trout knife 1084 and box elder burl. Definitely going to be testing it out on some trout in the next few weeks! Thanks
    8 points
  6. I haven't posted much stuff here lately, and that's because I have been working on one knife since February and the design elements have given me a lot of .....experience. This is built to the customer's specifications and contains many things I typically do not do, but c'est la vie. It is finally ready to show and I'll start making the sheath on Wednesday. The blade is O1 and about 5.375" long. The ring guard is a single piece of 416 SS forged to shape from a 1/2" slice (maybe 3/4"?) of round bar 1.5" in diameter. Frame and pommel cap are 410 SS and the turned finial nut is 416 SS.
    8 points
  7. I've used this pattern several times, but I tried something different on one of these: We often speak of "mystery steel", but this is "mystery wood". I salvaged it from a warehouse parts tray 20+ years ago. I don't know if it's tropical or composite. The dust had a unique smell and was kinda sticky. It was worth the try though. It looks great and polished out nicely with just some 0000 steel wool and olive oil. The blade is 4.5" and about 8.5" overall. It's made from 1084. This is from the same pattern and steel
    8 points
  8. Here's my latest design using as-forged shanks and bows. The round cross-section is easy on the fingers. I shape the bows on a mandrel, so I can change the size and shape to fit. The long tail that forms the wrap is a little tedious to forge. Since it ends up under 1/8” diameter, it's like forging wire. As a dedicated hobbyist, I've lurked on this and other forums for years. I never felt qualified to comment on much of anything. When I started playing with scissors, I expected to find inspiration and ideas to steal online. I found next to nothing to
    8 points
  9. Here is a new one approx 240 layer 1084 & 15N20 Total length 24.5 cm, blade 12 cm. Bocote handle with blue liner brass guard and corby bolts.
    6 points
  10. Sunrise at my place this monring
    6 points
  11. Hey Everyone, I just want to make all those interested in Wootz Steel aware that we have now launched the International Wootz Society. It has been almost a year in planning and setting up, and we are now open and accepting members. The Society is for smiths, collectors, historians, researchers and anyone who is interested in the production, history or identification of historical crucible steels. We will be having testing of smiths and certification of standards of skill level for those who desire it. We also aim to educate the public with correct historical and technical information concern
    5 points
  12. This is getting somewhere. I found out that it's 14 years since I cast this blade. The blade was cast using a bronze age process, while I was still doing living history in Archeon. Back then the intention was to also finish the sword with authentic means. But the cast was not refined enough to do that, and would have cost me a hundred hours or so to finish the blade alone to a good enough reproduction. But with modern files it's a piece of cake. I rough ground one surface. The other side requires some more material removal, so I first take the mechanical shape corrector (angle grinder) to it,
    5 points
  13. Started another basket hilt for my dad's birthday in August. He'd made a blade for one maybe 15 years ago, but never got any further, so I borrowed it from him. It's a reproduction of the William Cleland sword from the 1670's, which was owned by a distant ancestor. It's an older style, and I figured it would be easier to make as it's simpler, but it turns out that trying to make a faithful copy of a particular piece is much more challenging than just making something in the same general style, as you're trying to intentionally reproduce a bunch of stuff that just kinda happened by accident on
    5 points
  14. Before you file flush, make sure all the points of the star are as far into the inlet as they'll go. Gentle hammering with a chasing hammer is okay, but the chasing burnisher used to smear the silver to fit the inlets back when I was inlaying silver into the iron head is better. It's more accurate and the force is concentrated. The burnisher, driven with a small chasing hammer. The inlay after burnishing down the points. File flush and sand as usual. And one thing I didn't show on the other inlay, but since I'm sharing so many lit
    5 points
  15. I haven't been very active at the forge for the last year, so I thought I'd give myself a kick in the pants by doing a WIP for my KITH entry this year. I've learned that unzipping the preverbal fly in front of the all-mighty interweb seems to motivate me to do my best work. Having never played with wrought iron before, let alone welding a piece of high carbon steel to it, I thought I'd do a simple wood chisel. Everyone needs a good 1" chisel, right? I started with a piece of 3/4" square wrought That I ordered from a guy up in Canada. I was advised to forge it mostly
    5 points
  16. Best work to date I think. 1084 and box elder burl. Still much to improve on! This is the first time I’ve stitched leather, quite a learning process Thanks
    5 points
  17. I had a pro pic done of this one at bladeshow, just got the image back from Sharp By Coop, This one also won the ABS Moran award (best knife in the style of Bill Moran)
    5 points
  18. got the Pro pic back from sharp by coop, managed to get the pattern to pop way better than I could in pics
    5 points
  19. Hello, i recently got that knife into my hands. Probably it is a knife from Dale, the city which was destroyed by dragon Smaug and after his death it was rebuilt. The knife comes from times after the city was restored. My opinion about its origin is based on two main things. First is obvious, it is a dragon head which is on top of the "locking mechanism". Second one is the style of decoration which we can see on the knife. Acording those sharp edges of the inlayed parts and a little carving in scales, i assume that it is influenced by the art of dwarfs who have their kingdom under the Mountain
    5 points
  20. Awright. Crossguard next. After sleeping in & motorbike ride.
    5 points
  21. Getting a press has made this go much faster, I actually have my first finished knife made from this material now. These two bars are both 8 layers of hearth steel made from wrought iron wagon tires. The sparks look like approximately 1% C, but hard to tell exactly. This nakiri is welded up from a piece of anchor chain with a piece of hearth steel welded in warikomi fashion. I decided not to etch it, I may try some stones or possibly just leave it to patinate in the kitchen. These two blades are through heat treatment, but likely won’t be finishe
    5 points
  22. Then things started to speed up a lot the last days! I peened the tang, so the indivual parts became one: Unfortunately there still was a little play between the grip and the tang as the slot was a bit too wide on this one. I fixed it by drilling two small holes through the wood, and injecting beeswax. The wood was going to be covered up, so I could hide the evidence Next up is covering the grip in leather. I've seen various narrow and broad seaxes that have been preserved with a thin layer of leather around the wooden grip. So I wanted to do that here too. One of these
    5 points
  23. Making a new batch of honing steels for attaching to knife sheaths I had about run out of the honing steels and had a few orders so set out to replenish the supply. I ordered in 4 x1 meter lengths of the 1/4 in spring steel wire and as it is cut off a coil it comes with the curve from the coil. First step is to cut the 4 lengths in to the shorter lengths needed to fit the two sheath sizes. next step is to straighten the lengths and to do that they are into the forge untill at sub critical temp of about 1450f and a few light taps with the ham
    5 points
  24. good evening I present the work of a friend Tony Nancey French cutler a folding knife with a Sandwich blade in 90mcv8/pure silver/90mcv8/pure silver/90mcv8 Has this kind of work been done before?
    4 points
  25. I said I won’t be able to do anything until next week but it kept calling me every time I looked at it. I contacted the Fisher museum and got some good info. I was made in the early 20’s and sold in 1932 . If it was sold in the year it was made they ground off the last two digits and rest amped it the year it was sold because they warranted it for one year. He also said it was a 350 / 400 pounder. He told me it was okay to wire wheel it lightly and give it a coat of light oil. so here’s what it looks like now.
    4 points
  26. Done. The blade is actually ball bearing encased in AK5 stainless, which I first overforged somehow, as its quite bit softer under hammer than 52100 and then it etched also quite dark, which I didnt expected. The chloride eats it like nothing. Well well. Next time.
    4 points
  27. It's been a long time since I have posted anything here, I thought it would be fun to show off some of my student's recent projects! Here are a variety of blades forged at the shop by our students - from a 16 year old forging a wakazashi to a septuagenarian with a bowie we have folks from all walks of life making blades :) I want to thank our wonderful teachers Justin Kirck, Stephanie Aiuto, Devon James, and Tahoma Hauptman for their diligence in helping students forge to their best ability. Coincidentally, Stephanie competed on Forged In Fire just two weeks ago and did fantastically
    4 points
  28. Thanks, the team of surgeons are positive that I'll make a full recovery, ironically I caught my overall sleeve caught while turning off the industrial size belt grinder I was using, a press of a button, a large jolt and a chopper ride later, Already planing and trying to draw left handed in my hospital bed
    4 points
  29. Kiridashi I made for a friend. 1084 steel, maple handle.
    4 points
  30. It's finally finished! 13 years since I started it. It's been quite a learning project, where I took my time until I felt confident (and had the time) to do the next steps. It's certainly not perfect, and I consider it a learning project, which could enable me to make a better one next time I attempt one. For reference, here is the original which is located in the depot of the National Museum of Antiquities in Leiden, Netherlands. It's a type I narrow seax, dating to roughly around 700AD. The blade started out as an antique leafspring, probably from a hand cart us
    4 points
  31. And it keeps coming together... Following are some random thoughts, feel free to comment or question. Had a productive meeting yesterday at the venue, determined the placement of the main tent, arranged potential food offerings for breakfast and lunch and got the schedule a bit more settled. The place is even prettier than I remembered it. The owners are craftspeople and understand what we're trying to do, and the primitive camping spots are awesome! No showers yet, but they're working on that. The schedule is, as these things are, open to change, substit
    4 points
  32. Then comes the eternal question: Do I punch a hole so it will be neat, scribe around the end on some sheet, cut it out, and then solder it on? Or do I just solder the thing to a bit of sheet, cut it out, and carefully drill an undersized hole to be cleaned up with files later? Since the hole is not exactly centered, and I'm not the most precise with the saw, I chose option two. Soldered to sheet: The side seam is done with hard, which flows around 1800 degrees F, and the end was attached with medium, which flows at about 1650 F, so as not to risk bad lang
    4 points
  33. I took some time on Wednesday for some forge therapy and added a few buttons and folds for more consolidation. Here is the process I developed. Cut the bar in preparation for folding and place a button on the bar. When it starts to melt, remove from the fire, smear with a piece of cold mild, and fold. Weld it. Draw out, and repeat as desired. I think I've added about 3 or 4 more buttons.. I decided to try a little manipulation and forged it on the bias. Then I reflattend it and let it cool.
    4 points
  34. Time for a little thread necromancy. Life has been really hectic lately and there hasn't been much shop time other than this complex commission I've been working on. Work has been rediculously crazy and I needed some forge therapy. So, I grabbed a hunk of this and went to town. The starting hunk. This has asome voids and pockets that need to be closed up with forge welding. It gets drawn out into a bar about 1 inch thick and 1.5 inches wide. This I hot cut and fold in three. Weld, draw out and normalize. Then
    4 points
  35. Still not fully in control of the pattern with 26c3, but I'm starting to get more activity. W2 steel is definitely easier.
    4 points
  36. I finished up a mushroom hunting knife with red canvas liner and Yew scales from a 140 year old tree. The scales have 160 growth rings from end to end. When making the sheath, I tried heating it up in the microwave for 15 seconds. That was a really bad idea.
    4 points
  37. Calling that a day. Lots of minor details cleaned up, and all sprued up. I’ll think on the crossguard, and figure it out moments before falling asleep, when the backbrain likes to fill the rest of us in. I’ll invest tomorrow morning, hit the motorbike for an afternoon of investment curing & mental reprieve, and cast tomorrow night. Film at 11.
    4 points
  38. I'm going to call this a win. I learned quit a bit for next time I did a quick dunk in some ferric. Looks like the wrought is going to have some patterning to it.
    4 points
  39. I got the surface grinder attachment I bought a couple of weeks back sorted today. It comes with a tool arm that has the wheel with a 20mm stand off from the tool arm byut my belt runs at 40mm from the tool arm so an arm with an extra 20mm stand off was added an no extra cost. Very pleased with the tool.
    4 points
  40. The is the 4th and last of the reproductions of the giant ceremonial bronze age dirk from Ommerschands reproductions. I cast this one nearly 3 years ago, but it's been held back by many things taking more priority in life. Now this is finished and delivered, I'm free to do whatever I want again So starting new projects, or finishing shelf warmers that have been waiting for up to and over 10 years. Note: these giant dirks were never intended to be hilted or sharpened. 6 of these type were found in spread the Netherlands, France and UK. They all have the exact same alloy including
    4 points
  41. This is an idea I've been fiddling with in my head. I had the forge hot and decided to go for it. It's a mezzaluna challenge coin thingee. End of a bar, forged out to silver dollar size. I gave it an overnight etch in white vinegar and a hand scrub at 600. It's not sharp yet, and it's going to need a little pocket protector. What do you think?
    3 points
  42. Speaking of lightening the casting, I’ll be grinding out the hollow space somewhat to dial in the balance point to that of the original. It’s very close, but at this point, I want to nail it.
    3 points
  43. Once it's pretty much flush with the wood and level on the back so there's no deeper pockets (if there's a deep spot in the middle the ends of the long points will raise up when you nail it on!), nail that sucker on. Adjust the outer points by gently hammering them down with a small hammer and file it truly flush. Fitted: Nailed: Flush. That's it for today. I'll do the other one tomorrow, and maybe some other stuff. I might take more pics of making the nails, if anyone's interested. It's much easier tha
    3 points
  44. And the assembly video is now live:
    3 points
  45. Small paring knife for my cousin. 3 1/2” blade. Poplar saya, thanks for the tip Alan.
    3 points
  46. Sometimes it is the small ones that take the most to get right and this letter opener and stand proved that again. Knife is NitroV with black paper micarta and resin ivory with the stand being a piece of black ivory with the resin ivory holder set into it.
    3 points
  47. Today I used my drawplate for the first time. I got one years back, just in case. I needed some bronze rod just under 2mm thick, and I only had 2.4mm. The first attempt was quite a struggle and took several hours. Having a headache and not slept well in two weeks didn't help either. Ok, so yeah, annealing between each pass helps as does being able to pull at full strength without the vise moving allover the place Second attempt went smooth and fast. And quiet. This time I didn't hammer the end thinner, but filed it instead. Not only much quieter, so I can do it in the evening while everyone s
    3 points
  48. This is ball bearing core with two strips of thick saw and some stainless over it. But I kind of overforged the stainless. Its gonna be interesting etched though.
    3 points
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