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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/03/2021 in Posts

  1. Just put this one together - another facebook makers challenge that got out of hand: clay hardened 1095 blade - I haven't measured it but it's about 8", and thin, not much over 1/8th", with a false edge on one side. Wrought iron bolster and mild steel guard, with mild steel and nickel silver spacers. the steel has been oil-blued, and the ns is sculpted and polished. Oil-blued steel pommel plate with carved mammoth ivory panels. Macassar ebony handle carved with high relief knotwork, with steel pins. Scabbard is laminated millboard covered in lambskin, wi
    14 points
  2. This one of my more interesting (at least to me) recent projects. It's a gift for someone who was born and raised on a farm in (then) Czechoslovakia in the first half of the 20th century which got me into learning about some of the knife styles from the area throughout history. I settled on the Pastiersky Nož (shepherd's knife), which in silhouette looks pretty standard but is adorned with ornate tin alloy decorations. I had previously seen these on knives from Siberia and Finland but didn't quite get how they were made. Luckily, I personally know a number of native Slovak (an by extension mor
    14 points
  3. Hi All Finally something worth showing here. I really enjoyed making this Bowie. Pattern welded blade, 1095, 1075 and 15N20 Deer antler handle, oxidized Sterling Silver fittings Guard Iron/Nickel deeply etched. Total length 43 cm, Blade 28.5 cm
    10 points
  4. Yesterday finished up this forged wrought iron letter opener with a Mesquite handle. It's a Christmas gift for a family member. I gave it a slight antique finish.
    8 points
  5. Finished a couple dozen knives past 2 months, and will post a few but this one I am quite pleased with. I inside finish could have been better done with better welding but the exterior fit and finish works nicely. The blade is W2 steel, thick and shiny. Originally planned clay quench and hamon but I didn’t like it, so took it to 2000 grit with mirror polish. The handle is Arizona Desert Ironwood, tough, heavy wood which helped maintain the sanding between the fittings of 410 stainless and N/S. The pommel nut is an 8-32 hex stainless stand-off. There is room for improvement but for today, I’
    8 points
  6. 1080/15N20 twisted crushed W's ,stainless dovetailed bolster.
    7 points
  7. Making Kitchen knives is no fun........change my mind. I got these handles ready to mount on these blade today.
    7 points
  8. Probably the last sword I'll finish this year as there's so much else I need to make before Christmas. This was a good exercise for making fullers and filework and I've really started to enjoy silver brazing things together Peening the nagel did require a little more creativity than usual with this setup Overall length 110cm Blade 82cm 8mm thick at the guard with a convex distal taper to 3mm 4cm from the tip Crossguard is 30cm wide Point of balance 11cm in front of guard Point og percussion ~60cm from guard Grip is cord bound leather over wood
    7 points
  9. There's a makers challenge on the book of faces that got me out of my messer dominated dreamland Started by going to the ever growing pile of half hammered things I forget about and found a suitably sizes piece drew out a tang and shape a bit and then ground bevels. I usually like fully sanded surfaces but wanted to see how an as forged finish would look I've never really bothered with getting perfectly square shoulders as I find it a lot less frustrating to file the bolster to shape Walnut grip drilled and then
    6 points
  10. This is the video of welding of rather hefty initial packet. The sword will be for my friend Erik, who is helping on the press. And the welding of the tip. The tip cut.
    6 points
  11. Here's a set of four capers/skinners that I made for a customer by request: 1084 with camel bone and black G-10, brass pins. I had never done anything like this before, so they took forever, especially trying to get all four perfectly matched. It was fun while it lasted, but I'm glad to have them finished. They should get some field testing this weekend.
    6 points
  12. Graphic content below, so go away now if you're squeamish. No blood, that came about ten minutes later... So we all know that a belt grinder is capable of removing body parts (I didn't lose anything but skin and dignity) faster and even more easily than they remove steel. This means we usually treat them with the respect they deserve. A 36 grit belt at high speed will lay your knuckle open to the bone with a single slight touch. A 400 grit J-flex can slice you open like a bandsaw if you touch the edge of a slack belt at speed. Up until today, I'd never been mauled
    6 points
  13. Being that was only 20 bags, might be your body telling you that you're living too easy and you need some physical activity. Try moving the bags from one side of the shop to the other every two days until the soreness is gone :-)
    6 points
  14. Believe it or not, this is a 30 ton hydraulic press. It lacks no character that's for sure. I put a little paint on it today, hopefully I will have a video of it up and running by the end if the week. It weighs probably 300+ pounds. I learned a valuable and expensive life lesson when I picked it up. Always strap things down, even when you aren't going very far, especially on rough roads. My cute press tried to join me in the front seat of my truck and brought the back window with it in very small peices. So my "free" press is gonna cost me more than a Damascus hatchet, but by golly
    6 points
  15. I have tried to weld and draw another billet, this is is all O1, edges and all "dark" steel, the white is soft "iron". I think the weld of the tip came out nicely, this time pretty symetrical on both sides.
    5 points
  16. Just finished this up for a good friend of mine: 7 1/2" blade, .135" thick, 15n20. Handle is Jarrah. He wanted it to be able to both cleave, and slice vegetables. I wasn't quite sure how to accomplish that so I decided to bring the bevels up higher than I thought appropriate for a cleaver and then roll them back in with a slack belt to appleseed out the edge. Time will tell how well it works, but the bit of testing I did with it seemed to do both jobs adequately. Comments and critiques are always welcome. Thanks for looking!
    5 points
  17. Up front, I’m not completely happy with this guy. A couple reasons for that; I’m an idiot and used stainless pin stock in the nickel silver bolsters, the bolsters I stubbornly decided to add to the knife after I’d already drilled my scales, and some fit and finish stuff that I really have to make myself spend the time in to get right. All that said, I’m still reasonably happy with this 4” EDC I forged out of 1084. 3 normalization cycles, quenched in warm canola oil, and tempered @ 325*F for two 1-hr cycles. Stabilized ironwood scales, felt liners/spacers , nickel silver bolster
    5 points
  18. Finally finished the cu Mai knife this was my first try at it and I was very happy with the results. The blade is A203,copper,15N20,copper and a 26C3 core. The handle is African blackwood with a peened copper pin and an A203/copper bolster. My photography is still lacking ,but I'm working at it. Wow I just figured out drag and drop.
    5 points
  19. I've made my own heat-treating kiln. Had to adjust a few things, but today I was able to do my normalizations, heat for quench, and temper on 2 different batches of blades. I'm thrilled!
    5 points
  20. So colder weather is upon us and I now have a chance to fire back up the hearth furnace. During the break away from this I made a new base for holding the bricks. It's made from cast-o-lite 3000 with a core (not shown) of inswool 2600. Molded spaces for the bricks to fit them nice and tight to make it easier to get the wire around without having to struggle. Worked so well I almost didn't need the wire. Used it today for its maiden voyage and it worked beautifully. Had planned on 5 runs but due to mishaps with an experiment I tried, I only got four completed runs in. The exper
    5 points
  21. Not a scramaseax, but scrapaseax, forged from the cutoff tip of my latest sword blade. I think its kind of nice, altough rather thin (4mm).
    5 points
  22. I've been interested in debas for a while, and have made a number of them over the past few years. The width and thickness combination (almost 1/2" thick at the spine and 2" wide for larger ones) makes them pretty hard to forge, especially getting good welds between a thick piece of mild steel and a thin piece of edge steel. It seems like there's not nearly as much out there about making these as other kinds of Japanese style kitchen knives, so I figured my mistakes may also help anyone else trying to make these. These are my first and second, the left is 1095 and some old scrap mild ste
    5 points
  23. Thanks everyone, I'm glad I'm not the only person interested in these! As some of you have noticed these are almost paradoxical knives. Like Brian mentioned, Japanese kitchen knives are often meant to be very well tuned to a specific task and often quite delicate. Debas are so different because they are meant for a task that requires two very different things from a knife, essentially a cleaver with a fillet knife cut into the end of it. There are thinner debas for just filleting and funayuki which are basically a deba thin enough to cut vegetables (meant as as an all purpose knife for fisherm
    5 points
  24. Well, I guided my niece to her first whitetail harvest a few weeks back. It's safe to say that she's hooked on hunting now, so I decided to make he a "real" general purpose hunting knife. The pictures kind of suck, but she has it now so they are the best I'm going to get. 3.5" blade of 1084. Brass fittings with African Blackwood and figured Black Walnut. The handle was a challenge as I tried to fit it to her tiny hand. Normally I just make them feel right to me and move on. Comments and critiques are alway welcome.
    5 points
  25. I realized that I never posted the progress on the nakiri. I just wrapped it up, so here it is: Trying a slightly different process here. It still starts with drilling a hole in the horn and expanding/tapering with a round and jeweler’s ring files. Next is cutting the tenon with a saw, chisel, and rasp. This time with a matching taper plus a very small undercut. Here’s the new thing I’m trying. Heating the horn to reduce the stiffness and hopefully get a bit of plasticity. No glue, just drive it home after fitting to where it is in the previous picture.
    5 points
  26. Much appreciated guys. @Charles dP, that effect is actually much easier than it looks. It's a result of a simple 90 degree groove machined into the guard, with a matching angle cut onto the wood with a miter saw. Once you start sanding the profile of the handle it naturally takes on that nice swooping curve. This pic shows it a little better from the top.
    5 points
  27. As i promised last time, i am attaching a "brother" of the last presented knife. It is more inspired by northern knives and i have used a birch bark for the first time here. And i have to say it certainly was not for the last time, i think it´s very nice material and i love the scent of it.
    5 points
  28. Hi guys, I was talking to a client on the phone a couple of weeks ago regarding a project I am working on for him, when I mentioned that I was going to make some jewelry for my wife for Christmas... Well, not five seconds passed before he asked if I could make something for his woman while I was at it. Well, I agreed to make his woman a little "something" - and I just now finished the photographs. Thought it might be of interest to you guys as well knowing we all like shiny things.. Unfortunately though, this one isn't much for cutting...
    4 points
  29. That was a cross-guard. Also, it was only a flesh wound!
    4 points
  30. It's alive, IT'S ALIVE! MWAHAHAHAHA!!!! I had an old face mount pump motor sitting on the shelf. Turns out that one was reversible. The temporary mounting system is somewhat, "custom". But now that I know it works I can fab up a new mounting plate for it.
    4 points
  31. Bought a new multi process welder the other day to upgrade frommthe 1930's stick welder so have a bit of learning the new and hopefully better weld process. Most likely have to break the shed rules and read the instruction book to figure out some of its likes and dislikes. Will do gasless for a start but most probably get gas later on for the small delicate work I often need. Also bought a pressure pot to make the stabilising process a bit more time eficient. It usually takes a few days in the vaccume pot and the understanding is that twice that time is needed after the vacuu
    4 points
  32. I got a chance to get out to the shop after a few weeks away. I managed to get a spiralized handle mostly done on a sword, and got started on the pommel.
    4 points
  33. I have always liked Sydney Pollack´s film and when I found there is a bowie from sheffield by Butcher and Wade, that Johnson used roughly since 1860 till 1905 I have tried to make an inspired piece. It has not a hollow grind, because the wheel the original was ground must have been around 60 cm and more ( my own 30 cm contact wheel was too small as I have found trying). The preforged piece was over 9 mm thick at the guard and forged down both towards the tip and the end of the handle. I have included (entirelly fantastical) guard which seems to be missing from the original and used moose sca
    4 points
  34. Dry Fit up and handle work on the kitchen knife today It's a bronze bolster to give some heft (as per the customer's request), a micarta spacer (because I can't seem to get anything flat without removing too much material.....and needed to fill space), and Orange Osage. For my second kitchen knife I'll take it...but there are many places to improve on the next
    4 points
  35. Another knife with design led by the customer - 6" W-2 clay hardened blade, African blackwood handle, G10 bolster. Clint
    4 points
  36. Similar to Jaro's Jeremia Johnson knife posted recently, a fella requested a "Mountain Man" style bowie and this is what I came up with. Blade forged from 2 horseshoe rasps forge welded together to get some thickness, clay hardened. Guard is forged stainless, damascus spacer and whitetail shed handle. Sheath has a bit of beaver tail hide for that "frontier" flavor. Clint
    4 points
  37. First knives to be sold. Was asked to make a set for a bigger guy and his petite wife. So one smaller than the other. Didn't get them to match exactly, but close. His mom ordered them as Christmas gifts.
    4 points
  38. Been using this setup for years. I don’t fold up for the traditional polishing position anymore, getting old. The tray that catches the water under the stone drains into the bucket. The clamp hold whatever size stone you want. I copied the design from a buddy who’s been polishing for 30+ years. Dan
    4 points
  39. Hello i would like to tease you a little for my another project. It is going to be rohirrim pattern welded spear with brazed bronze inlayed wings. I will show just a part of the blade yet (the best part, because it has lot of mistakes again :/). The progress of castings is very slow and inlaying is even slower for me . I hope i will finish it to the end of the year :D
    4 points
  40. Did a test run on my new press. It smashed a 1/2" round bar into a 1/4" inch flat bar. 20211111_152741.mp4
    4 points
  41. Pay no attention to Wayne, he forgets to see where you are before offering to sell you stuff. A couple weeks ago John N. mentioned these guys out of Manchester: https://manchestergrinders.co.uk/ Looks like good stuff!
    4 points
  42. The axe I forged last month. Copy of the F-type axe found in Birka grave 750. The weight of the corroded original is 1260 g. My replica has 1700 g, the size of both is the same: 180x222 mm. I used 19century wrought iron and old steel. The eye of the axe is folded and welded. Before i started to forge i print it in scale. To forge body of the axe i used 19cent. wrought iron round bar (part of the steam engine). Cutting age is 1045 steel etching in nitric acid showed a very heterogeneous structure of the wrought iron (crystals up to 3 mm).
    4 points
  43. Had a reasonable Heritage day with sales and some positive prospects going forward but while there are a couple in the order book the last post (shipping times) for the year will be here before they are done so there is not the urgency to complete them which allows me to have a play with something I have been contemplating for some time. I have seen a number of long swords on the forum and without getting into a longer tempering oven, I am limited (length wise) in what I can attempt. The Hunting Sword is what I have set out to make, and with an 18 inch blade, I can make it with what I have o
    4 points
  44. Have a pair of bearded chefs, a heavy hunter and four of the new 5 inch filliting stainless blades ready for hardening so away to town tomorrow to pick up the liquid nitrgen. Finished out the day by grinding the bevels on the sheep shear blades so they are ready for handles now.
    3 points
  45. Today I tried to layout the handle. I have a nice piece of boxwood that should fit the ticket. I start by drawing the blade profile, including the tang. The blade here is at 600 grit finish. Add some layout lines and scale the components off of a photo I found in another post by @jake cleland Erase the layout lines and tweak the profile a bit. Add some knot work design ideas. I'm basically copying the embellishments in that same Dirk photo. Let me know what you think of this. Are the haunc
    3 points
  46. Now on my YT channel, my cutting test standard for chef's and kitchen knives:
    3 points
  47. Now the piece has lots of structure, seems to hold well together. I shall cut and weld the tip, flatten and straighten on tommorow, because now I look like demon out of hell. Or very autistic Orang-outang.
    3 points
  48. I ended up buying a grinder. I have my new Reeder grinder up and running. Man this thing is great. Haven't had a chance to use it on a blade yet but I did bevel a piece of scrap. I can't believe how much time it cut from the old 1x30. I have used it for bolster material and a few other things. I just love it. The one pic I didn't move the work rest into the right position for the large contact wheel. The folks at Reeder especially Greg are great to work with. E-mails and phone are always answered within hours.
    3 points
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