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  1. 10 points
    When I first got interested in mustard patinas, I asked around how it was done and the answer I got was "you put mustard on the blade". While I understand it meant there was no wrong ways to do it, I was hoping for a bit more details . Now that I've done a few patinas and had A LOT of requests on how I get this stonewashed look, I'm going to give you the details in this short tutorial. This bladesport'ish blade was not intended to have a patina but it was the only one I had around that's large enough for a good demo. In case you wondered, it is 80CrV2 steel. This patina will work pretty good on any simple carbon or tool steels, as long as they don't contain too much nickel like 15n20 or L6. The nickel increases the steel's resistance to acid. So, what I first do is hand sand the blade to #800. It may not be necessary but I like how, after the patina is done, the blade is still shiny from a certain angle of view and shows how good the finish is. After the blade is finished and cleaned with acetone or brake cleaner, I use these cotton pads to dab the mustard. Only a small amount of mustard is necessary. The thinner the layer, the darker the finish. I dab a LOT to get an even layout. Now is the time to let it dry. Wait at least 30 minutes. Then clean thoroughly in soapy water and dry. Here's what it looks like after just one layer. You may be satisfied and stop there or do a second layer for a darker and more homogeneous finish. Everywhere there was tiny mustard spikes is where the blade did barely etch and shows those lighter spots. Now a second coat. And how it looks after a good cleaning. I have found that applying a thin film of food grade mineral oil darkens the finish even further. It's not been applied yet on these photos. If you have any questions, please ask and I'll update the tutorial if needed.
  2. 10 points
    Hello: Been sorta busy around here with family stuff since we have a brand new granddaughter so this is something I whipped out real quick.. This one is welded from a mix of 1095, L-6 and a bit of meteoric iron thrown in ..8 1/4" Maiden Hair blade...Phosphor bronze mounts...Some of that bowling ball material for the fluted grip..This piece looks like a deep reddish maple burl! Turned out OK...at least I think so... The sheath is set with a 17.65 Ct star ruby.. cut this one myself.. All in all I think it didn't turn out too bad.. Hope the photos work... This one is website stock and is currently listed there... JPH
  3. 10 points
    This is the latest collaboration sword from myself Petr Florianek . We wanted to make another fantasy sword yet at the same time keeping a firm grip on reality. This a very much a “real” sword but also a dragon slaying hero’s sword! The sword blade takes inspiration from early Saxon blades, marrying that history into Tolkien’s middle earth and the world of the Rohirrim horse lords. The blade was made by myself and the handle and scabbard are Petr’s work. The blade takes inspiration from early Saxon patternwelded blades and has a lenticular section giving it the heft and strength needed when fighting dragons! It is important for me that anything I make has a functional reality to it. A reality based upon the imagined purpose of the object . This is the sword of a mighty horselord hero with the pride and fate of his people behind him. A sword for battling a dragon. Bryneleoma has a patternwelded blade 3 core bars twisted anticlockwise, clockwise and anticlockwise, the core bars are wrapped in a high layer damascus edge . The bold core pattern contrasting the fine layers of the edge. In Petr’s words… I wanted to make a truly heroic sword and when given Owen’s mighty blade, I had enough inspiration to get the feel of it. The blade is hefty and long so I immediately started to picture a mounted warrior; a hero on a horse, a proto knight if you will. The inspiration for this sword is firmly set in Tolkien’s Middle Earth, in the world of the Rohirrim horse lord. The motives for ornamentation are simple – he dragon on the pommel as the most powerful enemy but also a symbol to ward off evil. On the handle a series of knots representing fate being spun by higher beings. The knot on the guard symbolises oath, the oath of the horse lord bound to his people as their protector. An oath from sword to swordsman, the guard of the sword being there to protect its heroic master. I love doing these pieces with Petr, and always look forward to getting the finished piece. He has a way of bringing a blade to life.....
  4. 10 points
    Hunter , 1095, brass, leather, deer antler, total length 25.5 cm blade 13 cm.
  5. 10 points
    It seems Brian and I both had the idea to follow Steve Culver's instruction book on how to built a slipjoint folder without making patterns first. Like Brian, I know this is not going to be my last one! This one is bound for Knife in the Hat, and I will use what I learned making it to make the next one even better. Specs: Blade and backspring, 3/32" precision ground O-1 flat bar Brass liners with Nickel Silver bolsters and pins. Jigged bone scales from Culpepper & Co., Amber dyed, Catalina pattern. Open length 5 7/8" / 147mm, blade length 2 5/8" / 66mm. Closed length 3 1/4" / 82mm Maximum thickness 3/8" / 11mm I made two changes from Culver's design. I omitted the scale pin near the peak of the liners because I thought it was unnecessary and distracting, and I rounded the tang because I've never liked a knife with a half-stop. It just seems ridiculous to me and serves no purpose except to break your thumbnail if the spring is too strong. Speaking of which, I am really happy with the spring. It isn't too heavy, and the knife snaps open and closed with authority. The judge of how strong to make the spring is my wife, if she thinks it's too strong, back to the grinder! It feels much like any good factory knife of its size, spring strength-wise. And now for the pics! The problems I had with this one: 1. The pivot pin is not invisible on one side. 2. The blade is not dead center when closed. 3. A minor slip at the grinder moved the left-hand plunge line back into the kick. 4. While soldering the bolsters, the scribed line on the right bolster was not where I thought it was, resulting in a mismatch between the two sides. Much colorful language and careful filing followed. There has been a bit more cleanup on it after these pics were taken, mostly to remove that facet on the underside of the bolsters. I also engraved that spot with my initials since I forgot to do the blade prior to hardening...
  6. 10 points
    Id like to credit this award to all the foundation work and help i acquired over the last couple years directly from this forum! Without you guys I don't know how far i would have progressed but i wouldn't be where i'm at for sure. Anyway, Im still in shock. I wanted to show and give credit to Alan and salem and the other 100 guys on here that have given me A LOTTTT of their time answering dumb questions. Also, to encourage the newer guys to keep cranking out stuff and trying and making knives! 320 layers Laddered (appears random until you see the chatoyance) -trippy forged integral 2.5" tall at the heel 9.25" long Amboyna 5 stack of g10 spacers 5.5 oz
  7. 10 points
    Don gave me this blade five or six years ago and said, "Make something beautiful with it". Hmm, ok, so it rumbled around in my mind until last fall. It was a slow process figuring out the transition, theme and all the details, but I think it came good in the end. I didn't find out until it was almost finished that it was Don's last patterned blade. I knew it had to be one of the last, but THE last. I'm glad I didn't know as I was working on it. Below is a little of what I've written. More to be read here: Kelso Journal And a slide show with more photos here: Fogg/Kelso In keeping with the persona of a hunting knife, I chose to represent features of the Vermont woodlands that would be familiar to a skilled, observant woodsman. These include tracks of the Red Fox, leaves of Red Maple, Beech, and Red and White Oaks, and a feather. The feather was modeled from the Ruffed Grouse, but altered in shape and color to fit the surroundings. I chose a feather as a sign of passage, which in the case of birds, could be molting, conflict, flight or death. Feathers have such deep and subtle beauty. My wife Jean and I have a collection and I always wonder, when finding a single feather, what the story was. The tracks, leaves and feather are all signs, marking activity and transition, the meaning of which is read by the skilled woodsman. This project has been very satisfying for a number of reasons. I was touched and honored when Don gave me the blade to finish. I did not realize until the piece was nearly finished that it was his last patterned blade, which greatly enhances the meaning for me. Don is a legend in the smithing world, and rightly so. Apart from his technical innovations, he has an artistic eye, both for pattern and form, which is rarely, if ever matched. In addition, his Bladesmith’s Forum stands as an unparalleled online resource for beginning and accomplished knifemakers.
  8. 10 points
    Let me present Roðinn Hrafn - the Red or "Bloodstained Raven". Blade in folded and twisted railroad steel, in a san-mai lamination with Øberg steel for the core. Handle in stabilized Maple, with Holly for the core, copper, brass and vulcanized fiber. The Holly is engraved with Elder Futhark runes - written in old Norse - and filled with ashes. Any and all critique, is ... as always - most welcome. :) Sincerely, Alveprins.
  9. 10 points
    Hey everyone! I finished this piece a few days ago, so I took some photos and thought I would share! This began as a small billet for a demo at NESM for their annual hammer in, and upon finishing the blade a client signed onto the project, so I designed the hilt and we went from there! I still have to make the sheath, and when it's done I'll update this thread. The blade is seven bars of pattern weld, wrought iron on the spine, four twisted bars, more wrought iron, and then an edge of ~400 layers. The handle is moose antler, bog oak, silver, wrought iron, and rubies. I guess I'll do the usual and post a few finished photos and then a WIP! WIP time! So this piece started off as a billet about 8 inches long. I twisted everything extremely tight and laid up the wrought iron and edge bar. I tacked the billet on one end and brought it to Maine with me. I was invited to demonstrate on both days, and first gave a lecture on the historical seax and then did a practical demo the next day, forging a long seax. I then brought the blade to Zack Jonas' workshop a while after it was finished and began to work out what the design should be. Drawing from a few different artifacts I designed something that intrigued me. I used a few drill bits and a set of needle rasps to get the bolster fit properly. Here you can see the fit bolster next to the sawn bog oak and the drawing I made for the client. I used the needle rasps to file and clean up the slot for the tang to seat in the wood properly which is a new trick, I promptly went and bought my own set after! That's as far as I got at Zack's, and upon returning home I began to shape the handle. I always do my rough shaping on the belt grinder to establish the lines I am after and then use files or sandpaper to refine the shape. In this case I am going for a slight hourglass shape and need to do some careful firework to establish my lines. After about an hour the work is done and I can polish to about 400 grit in preparation for the rest of the detailing. At this point I figured I would set the half moon shape on the bolster as per my design. I did this freehand on the grinder and then polished with some paper on a flat surface. Here you can see there is a slight inletting in the edge side of the bolster to allow the blade to sit better. I used a jewelers saw to begin the cuts for the silver wire and then a series of files and rasps to make the recess for the wire. After some epoxy and a few wracked nerves the silver is in place. I couldn't remember what size bezel wire I had used in the past on the amber seax, but I did some experimenting and figured it out. Here's the piece next to the scaled up drawing I made to keep with me as I was working. I think I'll start doing this more in the future. I cut out the piece of fine silver and annealed it, then bent it to shape on the back end of the bog oak grip, and because it was so soft it readily accepted its new shape. I took some nice wrought iron I had and cut a small coupon off and drilled and filed a hole to fit it to the tang. My original thought was to make the pommel just a cap and not be held on by the tang, but Peter convinced me I should weld an extension to the tang and peen the pommel on. Here I am using sharpie to get a vague idea of where I should grind to. I never really do this sort of work with a caliper and exact measurements, instead using my eye to get things close. I may change this some day and do more exact work, but for the style of work I do I feel that this gives my work a more 'organic' nature. I roughed in the shape on the grinder and then drilled my holes. I probably would change the order of operations next time. Once the pommel was roughly fit I began to tune the shape with files. Eventually I ended up with this. I began to peen the bezels in place from the inside to hold them properly. I did all of the setting work before attaching to the handle so I could burnish all the way around easily. Once the rubies were set I peened the whole thing together after administering some epoxy. Here you can see the peen isn't cleaned up yet. After some careful belt grinding and 2000 grit paper to clean the peen up, I went out back behind the shop to take some photos! I hope that's helpful or at least informative, thanks for looking guys!
  10. 10 points
    I apologize again for my relative absence, I try to remember to post here but since I know so many of you outside the forum now, I tend to forget I'm sure many of you have already read this and seen the pictures, but for my friends here who aren't on Facebook or Instagram, here you go I've taken the time to focus on improving my knowledge and skills this past month of September, trying to achieve some things I've never been able to do before. This started by spending an entire week in New Hampshire at Zack Jonas's shop as a student of the one and only Peter Johnsson. That week, I took a sip of knowledge from a fire hydrant of information. Peter was an insanely great teacher and was able to get some valuable ideas through even my thick skull, and I got to experience some things that will stick with me for the rest of my career, such as handling 2000+ year old swords, knives, and scabbards, staying up at night having philosophical discussions around a fire... This has all been tied up into a bow with the completion of this sword. It's a British style middle La Tène era sword I've named Epona, after the Celtic goddess of horses, who undoubtedly would have been important to warfare and calvary. It's a happy coincidence that I chose the British style, since through a convoluted string of events, I recently discovered that pretty much all of my heritage comes from the British isles. The blade is a lenticular cross section pattern welded blade, made from a mix of high carbon steel and old wrought iron in the core, and high layer Damascus edges forge welded to the softer core. The hilt is made from ancient bog oak graciously given to me by my good friends Dave Delagardelle and Tony Greenly, and the spacers are bronze in a stacked construction, just like the ancient British swords. During the finishing phase of this project, I spent about as much time wearing an optiviser as I spent without one. I put more skill and attention to detail into this piece than I have on anything I've ever made, and I feel that it marks a new era in the quality of my work. Thanks for reading everyone! If you've read this far, thanks a lot! Let me know if you've got any questions, critiques, comments, etc!
  11. 9 points
    Some people might remember my first "Seax knife" that was actually a tanto... This is my second atempt, much better considering I sharpened the right side this time. My grandparents wanted something to display on the mantle, I thought this one would do nicely. The blade is 1080 and 15n20, with a brass guard, elk antler spacer with black fiber gaskets, and brazilian ebony. Overall length is 8 1/2", with a blade length of 4". I made this in master bladesmith Audra Drapers shop, under her close supervision. Hope you all enjoy.
  12. 9 points
    A recent piece of work. A pattern welded tomahawk with a 5 bar construction with each bar having 14 layers. The cutting edge is approx 500 layers. The edge is 2 1/4" and the head is 6" long.
  13. 9 points
    I've been working on a pipe tomahawk head and finished up the filing on Sunday. After taking the last few strokes with a 3" needle file, and seeing the 16" mill bastard next to it, I thought it would be of interest to some to see the results of drawfiling the way I do, the end result, and every single file I used on the project. First, drawfiling. For hawk heads, there's really not a good way to finish them totally on the grinder because of all the odd curves and stepped lines. Well, maybe if I had a small wheel attachment, but not as I am currently set up. I forge to shape, remove the scale and rough profile with an angle grinder, then use the belt grinder to rough in the surfaces, although it's not strictly necessary. Once the scale is gone you can jump straight to filing, I made hawks that way for eight years before I got the belt grinder. Once I have it as flat as it's gonna be on the belt grinder (36, 60, and 80 grit zirconia followed by A300, A160, A65, and A45 trizact), it's time to drawfile. I start with the 16" mill bastard, which immediately shows where the belt grinder did not make it truly flat. Then to the 12" mill bastard, then on to the six-inchers. Mill bastard, Mill 2nd cut, then mill smooth. After the last strokes with the 6" mill smooth, it's ready for 220-grit paper. I originally took this picture to show the carbon migration from the 1084 edge steel to the wrought iron body, but then I realized I had never posted a picture of a properly drawfiled surface. There are still a couple of 36-grit scratches on the edge steel, but that will be ground away after heat treat. Yes, this is not yet hardened. Also, I should mention if you don't have a belt grinder you can do the entire thing with files. Just takes a little longer. Next, here is the result of all the filing, both draw and push. See what I mean about things you can't do with a belt grinder? Every last bit of surface you see is the result of filing. There was a lathe involved in creating the bowl, but files were used on the bowl while it was in the lathe chuck as well. Note this is as-filed, it has not been sandpapered yet. Well, the molding between eye and blade has been cleaned up with a 1/2" sanding drum for a Dremel, but that's it. Finally, the files used in making this hawk: From the left, we have the 16" mill bastard with one edge ground safe (heavy stock removal and rapid drawfileing), the 1/4" chainsaw (setting some of the curves on the lathe), a 14" long-angle lathe file (fast stock removal push-filing, tends to leave a smoother surface than the 16" mill) 12" round file (lathe work), 12" mill bastard for intermediate smoothing, 8" half-round for setting the transition from eye to blade and shaping that little step on the bottom, the three six-inch mill files (bastard with safe edge, 2nd cut, and smooth), two 6" three-squares, one slim and one XX-slim with a safe edge (these were used to make the grooves and clean up the inside corners on the bowl), and finally, the 3" round needle file that was used to clean up the grooves. The 16" is the workhorse of the family. Used as a push file it cut the shoulders on the transition and the V on the eye. As a draw file it flattened and blended the blade. The long-angle lathe file has two safe edges (meant to be used on the lathe, it won't mar the chuck). The round file and big chainsaw file clean up my sloppy lathework on the neck of the bowl. The other bastard files are just used to clean up after the one before. The three-square XX-slim with one face ground smooth can cut dovetails, but it also acts like a knife to cut very sharp straight lines for the grooves. The slim three-square follows those lines to widen and deepen the cut, and the needle file removes the coarser marks of the bigger files. And that's only about a quarter of my file collection...
  14. 9 points
    Some quick iPhone pics to prove it so I can finally say this project is DONE! Summer gets crazy busy with almost no shop time but I eked out enough time to put on the finishing touches. I think I’ll try to get some good pictures and then these go to the intended recipients. Without further ado: Pretty proud of the result. Quite a few things I will tweak on the next go around. Always room for improvement. Hope you all enjoyed the WIP. Adam
  15. 9 points
    Hello!! Here are a few pieces I whipped out this last week or so....yes I committed forgery! All are hilted with some of my Bovine Ivory (I love using that stuff..very nice material when done right)... Pic heavy so...with out further adieu ..away we go!! JPH
  16. 9 points
  17. 9 points
    Here's my finished Arkansas Toothpick/Dagger: Custom Damascus, stabilized mastodon ivory bark, 416 stainless w/blade steel inlays:
  18. 9 points
    The knife was made by the very good friend George Plataniotis,a Farrier in real life.... He made it to honour all the farriers who work hard.. ""The five elements of farriery knife" Anvil - hammer - fire - rasp - horse all that stuf helps a farrier to make his living !!! Forged farrier rasp , brass shaped with file by hand. Plataniotis George All rights reserved" 10154952_724713490956251_8587702440613943480_n (1) by theodore Anastoulis, on Flickr IMGP2759 by theodore Anastoulis, on Flickr IMGP2770 by theodore Anastoulis, on Flickr IMGP2789 by theodore Anastoulis, on Flickr IMGP2814 by theodore Anastoulis, on Flickr Thank you all for your patience and for viewing! Have a nice day from Greece
  19. 8 points
    I finally bowed to the peer pressure of a friend and made him a chef knife. It is 88 layers of 1080 and 15N20 laddered with a bronze bolster, black G10 spacer, and a pretty stabilized Redwood burl handle. Caleb Royer did the picture. Anyhow, here is it. Let me know what you think gentlemen.
  20. 8 points
    I have been playing with patterns...I took an iron jewelry class with Janos Gabor Varga earlier this year ( a great class) and it got me thinking about some patterns...a bit of experimentation and a few cockups later this came along! Helter skelter pattern... what do you recon?
  21. 8 points
    Finishing this up for a friend. She wanted a seax with some Japanese flavour, and this is what I came up with. 7 1/2" blade, 1" wide and 1/4" thick at the break, 13" overall. Sculpted copper blade collar, buffalo horn fuchi and kashira with copper accents. Carved walnut handle in a take down construction secured by a copper pin. The blade needs a light buffing to brighten it, and I need to finish the sheath tomorrow, so I'll try and get some better pics then... let me know what you think...
  22. 8 points
    I've had this chunk of meteorite laying in my shop for some time and decided it's time to use it. I've made two blades from this chunk already. I'm not sure just what type of blade I will make from it but that's still a long way off. There are two things that you must keep in mind when working a meteorite. One is that they have no carbon content so you must weld them to steel that has too much carbon in order to sacrifice some of it through migration in order to end up with a billet that will harden then way that you want. For this one I'm welding it to two pieces of W1 steel which has 1.05 C. Also you must remember that most meteorites are very "red short". This means that you must do most of the forging to the blade after welding it between two pieces of steel so that it can't crumble & flake off. This is a chunk of "Campo de Cielo" meteorite. It is 92% iron & 8% nickel.
  23. 8 points
    I have been playing with feather patterns recently, started up looking at illerup idal blade fern patterns and later evolved to a feather pattern , trying to get a stand alone feather...Its been fun. and has lots of spin offs running in my mind. firy , flamy frondy stuff!
  24. 8 points
    I've been wanting to make one of these for ages and finally got around to it. The body of the knife is made from 2mm thick copper sheet which I've beaten and filed the top then applied liver of sulphur to patina the surface. The blade is made from Shiro 2 with a white paper steel core, blade thickness is 3mm, blade length is 75mm, that's cutting edge, overall length of the knife is 186mm and the closed length including the flipper is 135mm. I've called her Tombo, dragonfly, I hope you like her. Thank you for taking the time to look guys and all comments are really appreciated. Steve
  25. 8 points
    I wanted to share some photos from a recent hearth steel experiment we ran. The setup replicated how Emiliano has been producing hearth steel. Our protocol may have been slightly different: Input: Mild Steel (1in x 1/2in x 5/16in) and charcoal (1in pieces) 7 charges (150g mild steel + 400g charcoal). 1 charge every 4 minutes. One additional charge of 400g charcoal. Output: ~950g of high carbon stuff Here are some pictures of the setup: 7 Firebricks standing up; 1in tyuere at roughly 3/4 the height of a firebrick angled slightly downward. In action video Extracting the puck. After quick consolidation on the power hammer. Spark test. Looking good. Knife after heat treatment. Unfortunately, I made the tang transition below where I forge welded some mild steel. Oops.
  26. 8 points
    Not exactly blades, but they have edges and points so I thought they might still be of interest. I needed to make a new set of arrows for myself (I am making 24 but these are the first 8) that I didn't mind shooting and that I knew would hold up. I had made arrows before, but never forged my own points and never forged a socket before so this has been valuable practice. The heads are hardened and burned in. The shafts are barrel tapered port orford cedar spined for a 50lb bow, stained and sealed. The nocks were reinforced with ebony wedges. Turkey feather fletching with artificial sinew spiral wrap. Overall I am pretty happy with the first batch, though I definitely learned that I need to make the sockets a bit wider than it seems I should while forging.
  27. 8 points
    I didn't get in much shop time today but did manage to get the first of eight dogwood flowers roughed out. These will all get inlaid side-by-side into a billet of 1084 using a canoe & 1084 powder.
  28. 8 points
  29. 8 points
    Hello: Here is this last week's work..One worked and the others are what I call a pattern fail.. well.. as I have said before..experience is what you get when you don't get what you want so...while they turned out OK as a knife in general they are not what I wanted... Materials are 1095/L-6 and a small amount of meteoric iron.. Now the one that worked was the one I was sure wouldn't..that is the wavy feather pattern..THAT one did work and I think it came out pretty spiffy..I just wish I could make a longer piece cause a full length sword in this pattern would be totally unreal..It was a real PITA doing this pattern and I think I found a way that isn't so nerve wracking...More on this later once I work it out and get things sorted.. Hope these pics work.. This old man is back to work... JPH
  30. 8 points
    Ok, I'm too excited about this to not share it. I'm working on my second attempt at mosaic pattern, and just got my first glimpse of the pattern. I'm kind of bouncing up and down like a kid at Christmas right now...
  31. 7 points
    Here is yet another folder from me. This is the 5th one, and I am finally starting to get the hang of it. Another dozen or so, and I may actually get good at it. I've been using the same basic design, and focusing on making mechanical adjustments. The last few have all had pivot bushings to keep the knife from tightening up too much as I peen the pins. I made this bushing from A2, but the first couple I made from bearing bronze. I've also been fine tuning the process of peening the pins so that they disappear in the bolsters. I'm pretty happy with the action on this one, and plan to start making my own design for the next one. I'm liking the old-school aesthetic these have, and am leaning towards a Coke-bottle, or Barlow look in my sketches. If I have any success with my own design, I'll do a WIP and share the mechanical design details.
  32. 7 points
    So this is the first blade I forged (final shaping and bevels anyway) with the dogface hammer I made a while back... started with 3/16X1-1/2 1095 bar stock. I forged in the bevels, then ended up deciding to do a full flat grind. Not at all because the bevels weren’t even and I didn’t want them to keep chasing them upward on blade. Nope, wasn’t because of that at all Anyway, I do think I’m starting to make some improvement, or it could just be confirmation bias on my part lol. I did a 320 grit finish on the blade, 220 on the G10 scales for grippyness. Pretty sure that’s the technical term
  33. 7 points
  34. 7 points
    It's been forever since I posted, but I am still forging. I wanted to share my first attempt at a mosaic pattern. I have two more large bowies I was able to get out of the billet, but this was the first knife I forged from that bar of steel. What do you think?
  35. 7 points
    Hi all. Just finished this set of kitchen knives off. 9" chefs, 6" utility and a 6" k-tip. All out of 1070 with muwanga for the handles. The leather was a real mission. Each sheath has a double welt over 8mm thick. As always thoughts and critique welcome
  36. 7 points
    The finished knife along with another chunk of the meteorite. Hope that you enjoyed the trip through this one.
  37. 7 points
    I made myself a hammer I´ve wanted for a long time: an english style dog head hammer. Forged from 60mm square c45 steel (1045 basically) with a curly walnut handle, just because I wanted to be fancy. weight is 1500 grammes so about three pounds. This thing was a lot harder to forge than a normal hammer, the wedge shape keeps trying to shoot away under the hammer. Good thing I also have a grinder It feels nice to forge with so far, I have to see how I like it when I start forging a new knife.
  38. 7 points
    hi, Recently made axes. From left copy of battle axe from Podhorce with copper inlays, again Podhorce but without the inlays and Hadeby axe. Podhorce axe head is forged from old iron and steel with copper inlays. Podhorce (in the middle) and Hadeby axe made from high carbon steel. Thank you Jacek
  39. 7 points
    Pattern welded Kitchen knife, 275 layer,Handle Bog Rata (NZ Native) capped with sterling silver bolster.Total length 33.5 cm, blade21 cm
  40. 7 points
    Evening gents The blade for this vest Bowie is 6" long and 3/16" on the spine, it has a core of 80Cr V2 which has been laminated with Hitachi Shiro 2 and outer layers of 431 stainless. I've not used these steels in this combination before and I was really pleased how the carbon in the stainless has migrated into the Shiro 2 layers. The steel single branch hand guard has been cold blued and the handle is a lovely piece of stabilised Hawaiian Koa held with one stainless pin, the overall length of the knife is 11 1/8". The double welted sheath has been dyed walnut, with a black patterned front panel with small domed pins surrounding an inlayed python skin panel. I hope you like her, thank you for taking the time to look and all questions and critique very welcome. Happy Easter Steve
  41. 7 points
    Hello Forum, Its been too long since I posted here ! - still pop in for a browse quite often though. Ive been fairly productive making wise (by my standards) for the last year or so, and seem to be finding my groove with chefs knives. I have a strong bias on the forging of the blade, and forging as much geometry into them as I can, I am finding my way with grinding and handles, but a bit of me still views them as necessary evils so I can do more forging! This is one of the last ones I have done, the cladding is about 80 layers of wrought iron, mild, and bandsaw blade, over a core of Takefu Blue paper steel. This one has got a pure Ni barrier layer as well. The handle is Bog Oak.
  42. 7 points
    We made some hearth steel a couple of weekends ago. Ran into some issues at first but Emiliano came to the rescue with sage advice. Here is a knife from the material after heat treatment.
  43. 7 points
  44. 7 points
    Back from spring break. The kids had fun and no bones were broken... I guess I prefer going the opposite direction, downhill... Really fast Definitely a beautiful place! Back to business... Got some time to engrave tonight, so I started taking pictures. Caveat time... These pictures are really close up, I look back at them and the lines look horrible. Understand that this is magnified, and at normal working distance/ holding it in your hand, everything looks better I start by drawing what I want to engrave. I'm going more geometric on this design, we will see how it turns out. For straight lines on a curved surface I like to use tape, I have found electrical tape has super sharp and straight edges and can make complex curves given the round surface of the knife handle. Using a mechanical pencil I can get a precise line: I finish the outline Since this is smooth surface, this will wipe off very easily so I use an art fixative. Then it is time to engrave. I use a sharp skew chisel I made about a year ago. I have had difficulty recreating this thing, but I have modified it several times so that it fits my fingers as I hold it. Currently, I have it wrapped in Kirlex medical tape which cushions the handle and improves grip. The right hand guides the direction like a pencil, the left hand provides the power behind the edge. The whole concept is you are making a "V" shaped grove. You cut one side and you get a raised edge. Then switch directions and cut the other side. I have found if I'm doing it right I get a thin curly shaving that comes out of the groove and resulting V groove. Then I began the border design. I'm just kinda making this up as I go at this point. Another thing I started using was this measuring tape, it is awesome for laying out a design. I cut each line in one direction Then work the other way until the lines are cut. For a triangle cut I use a different, tiny chisel and make all the cuts in one direction (which I think helps maintain consistency). Then I switch directions and make the same cuts in the other direction and try to clean it up as much as I can. This is kinda like chip carving. Alright, I'm finished up for the night. I realize this is taking forever, but I have pretty limited time each night, so that's how I roll. The best part is the reveal, so I gotta finish up with a shot after I rub pigment (I use artist oil paints) into the groove. There you go. Hope that helps someone. Adam
  45. 7 points
    Made this one a few months ago. Blade is 10" and forged to shape from a billet I made with a centre core of 80CRV2 and 15N20/1084 mix. Guard is stainless, handle is African blackwood, pommel is low layer damascus. Thanks for looking. Clint
  46. 7 points
    After posting asking for help and advice in making my first knife (and realising I was in way over my head), I have finally finished it! Yes I have made mistakes along the way, and it took far longer than i could have ever guessed, but all that aside I am super pleased with how this has turned out. It has been a very steep learning curve, and now I want to do it again... Thanks to everyone who contributed to my original plea for help. I couldn't have done it without your input! Adam
  47. 7 points
    Hey everyone! Recently I've had the opportunity to do some work with Hurswtic near Worcester MA. They had an interest in iron making to explore Viking Age arms in a slightly more in depth way, and as soon as I found out I was very keen to be a part of it. We did a smelt recently that made 16lbs of iron which I cut and forged into small biscuits that we were then able to remelt. I have learned a huge amount from friends both on and off this forum who have stoked my interest in learning and experimenting with this process. Without that I would be more lost than I am now! Here is a link to some of the write up on Viking Age iron done by Hurstwic: http://www.hurstwic.org/history/articles/manufacturing/text/bog_iron.htm And the video that Bill shot and edited together of a presentation I did with them to teach how to create hearth steel from iron. Hope you guys enjoy!
  48. 7 points
    Dear All, These Anglo Saxon inspired seaxes are finally finished for my wedding two months hence! Some of the WIP (before I broke my camera and had to push onwards) is on this thread: Enjoy! Comments and Criticism gratefully received. I have learnt a heck of a lot on this build, if I were to be making just one I am sure I could have done a much better job of it. However, since there were ten.... yes ten.... with a definite deadline I struggled to spend the extra hundred hours on the sheath required per piece! All in all, I'm happy with them and I'm sure their new owners will be too. A huge amount of thanks must go to Sam Ecroyd, without whom this would not have been possible! Cheers, James P.S. Sorry about the bits of stuff on the blades, didn't realise there was dust on them until I was editing!
  49. 7 points
    Just finishing this one up. 10 3/4" blade of 1095, carved burr elm handle with copper mounts, tooled leather sheath with copper fittings: let me know what you think...
  50. 7 points
    Here is the result of about a year and a half of practice. I will not claim to be Sami, or even that this is a Sami knife. But a couple years ago I saw some of the beautiful work done by Sami Craftsman and decided I wanted to learn how to do it. This proved to not be an easy task. First, there is very little information out there on the process. Second, there seems to be a lot of misinformation out there. Third, most people I showed pictures of the knives to couldn't figure out why I liked them as much as I did. But... for some reason I am obsessed. I started following the few makers on Instagram I could find. I studied every post they made for clues. I asked questions and practiced. I found a couple WIP walk throughs and they helped a lot. I tried elk bone, mule deer antler, White tail antler, and Elk antler. I started cold calling reindeer farms for reindeer antler. I made multiple different engraving tools and failed many times before I found what I liked, and I'm thinking about changing it again. When I got to the sheath I spent hours trying to figure out what kind of leather to use, and subsequently the people at the local Tandy leather store thought I was nuts. But I finally found a place in Sweden that knew exactly what I wanted and shipped it pretty reasonably. Here is the result. My 13th knife. My first "Sami influenced" knife. It is a conglomeration of many experiments. It turned out quite fancy for my tastes and I think the next one will be more geometric, but for some reason I wanted to challenge myself with curves. 1075 blade, hand forged. White tail antler and cocobolo for the knife handle. hidden tang construction with threaded tang and holding nut with overlying wood inlay. sheath is leather and scrap walnut. Without further ado: Some in process Pictures: Some of my practice progress over the last year. You can follow along from left to right with some examples of my engraving attempts and also my progression of different engraving blades. I hope this isn't to many pictures. I visit this forum daily. I'm a pretty quiet person in general, and I do not post often because I don't feel I have much to add, but I wanted to let you know how much I appreciate this forum. The level of craftsmanship on this site are inspiring and you all have taught me a tremendous amount. Let me know your thoughts. As always, critique is much appreciated. When you stare at something for so long the eye gets biased... That and all the little mistakes become glaringly obvious. Adam
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