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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/28/2015 in Posts

  1. 16 points
    “Far over the misty mountains cold, To dungeons deep and caverns old, We must away, Ere break of day, To claim our long forgotten Gold the latest Seax by Myself and Petr Florianek... My blade but Petr has surpassed himself with the blade carving , handle and sheath ...My fave to date. hope you like it. [
  2. 16 points
    Hello! I apologize profusely for the novel that is about to come, I promise I won't be offended if you skip to the pictures I recently graduated from Hampshire College in Massachusetts. Instead of Freshman, Sophomore, etc, students are divided into Division I, II, and III. The first year you take a broad set of unrelated classes, and throughout your middle two years you hone in on something interesting you want to study. Your last year, Division III, is spent working on a thesis project that should be the culmination of the last three years of work and study, producing something wholly new, wether it is a long paper, an experiment, a novel, a play, etc. I have spent the last few years at Hampshire exploring bladesmithing, history, mythology, material culture, and how it all intersects now-a-days. When I arrived there I had never put hammer to anvil, but with some guidance from Elias Sideris and Don Dupuis, I began down the Way. Eli’s work was influenced by the Norse aesthetic, drawing from historical sources as well as wellsprings of artistic inspiration both new and old. I began researching, reading, and looking, and through other artists, like Jake Powning and Petr Florianek, I began to fall in love with that style of work. The seax and the sword captivated me and I began working to unravel their secrets and learn the proportions and geometries that make them be. I began to study Old Norse and the Icelandic Sagas and eventually became enchanted with the poem Beowulf. I first read it in high school and while I enjoyed it, I didn’t know anything about the poem below the surface. I began studying with Professor Craig Davis at Smith College who is a wonderful Beowulf scholar and knows the poem and its intricacies forward and backwards. He agreed to take me on in an independent study examining the use of weaponry in the poem. I began by isolating the four swords featured in the poem, and was later happy to see two of them brought to life by our own forumites and the crew of Arctic Fire 2016 when Dave Stephens created Hrunting, the ancestral and possibly fratricidal blade belonging to Unferth and lent to Beowulf for his fight against the mother. Then there is the Giant’s sword, brought to life by the fateful team of Jake Powning and Owen Bush, forged larger than life and more intricately than could have been imagined previously as a sword only a hero could have wielded. The Third sword is that of Wiglaf, which Dave DelaGardelle is conjuring into existence in his smithy with some steel that I forged for him. (this has been a call out Dave :)) Last but not least is the sword Nægling, an ancestral blade handed down to Beowulf by King Hygelac his forbearer. This is a kingly blade brought up earlier in the poem but used only in the final struggle against the serpent. This blade is an extension of the aged king, and carries the weight of his agency as king and protector. The blade breaks. Made by the hands of men, this heirloom is snapped when it impacts the serpents skull, too hard for normal steel. This is a beautiful moment in the poem for me. Beowulf is painted as the good guy. He has defeated monsters who wanted to destroy and cause harm to his allies. He selflessly defended the people in harms way and proved himself to be a very boastful but trustworthy and powerful man, capable of great deeds. This righteousness ends here. For all of his good intent and earthly power, the serpent IS death. Wyrd comes for all men, and soon the king too must rest. Having delved deeper into this poem I decided a year and a half ago that I would create this kingly sword as it was before it met fate. I had learned the art of hearth melting from Ilya Alekseyev, Mark Green, Zeb, Deming, and Matt Venier among others. I chose to create steel by the light of the full moon every month for a year, and that was the steel I would use to craft this blade. I created low and high carbon material from wrought iron nails, old projects, failed experiments, artifacts, pieces given to my by friends, iron and steel made by great smiths, like Ric Furrer and Jeff Pringle. I ran a melt at Ashokan, and with the help of some of my closest friends, and some wonderful new ones, I made a special piece of material that forged from a 6 pound lump into a 4 foot long bar with only a single crack in it. I helped run a summer class and taught 10 high schoolers how to run a hearth (or three) and make steel. I made material with friends and teachers and the process became as important as the result. At the end of these 12 months though I had come to the end of the easy part, and now I had to actually make the blade. The most important question was what would the blade look like? clearly it needed to be beautiful, as a kings sword would have been. It needed to symbolize the story, like the hilt of the Giant’s sword tells the story of the flood and the demise of the giants, this sword would tell the story of Beowulf and his demise. Enter in the sword from Vehmaa. Featured in the end of Pierces book, Swords of the Viking Age, almost as an afterthought, this blade captivated me since I first bought the book months after starting down this path. This incredible blade features different patterns on each side of the blade as well as an overlaid serpent in the top third of one side. The blade is broken in the top third, separating the serpent. This immediately jumped out to me as being a sword Beowulf could have carried, and the broken serpent was almost too perfect a parallel. Only one smith has been foolhardy brave enough to attempt this blade, and it's none other than my great friend Jesus Hernandez. His incredible creation, and still my favorite sword on this planet can be seen here: With his incredible example out in front I had to try and give it my best! I forged the blade, running into minor issues here and there. The blade itself I consider to be a failure, and is a practice piece for next time. the largest thing I had forged from my own steel was a small seax for Matthew Berry who graciously agreed to do a rush job on making a hilt for this crazy project of mine. I had made much of the steel I used for the sword at Matt’s house over the last year and it was fitting to combine our skills to make a sword worthy of the legendary king. So without further ado, I give you Beowulf’s sword! Just kidding WIP first! This is a small bit of the material I had made and started to refine for this undertaking. The iron and steel pieces were refined differently with an eye for what would go where in the blade. I had close to 60 pounds of material refined for the blade when I was done prep, just to be on the safe side! The billets finished and ready for welding, The leftmost is the edge wrap and the other two are the two sorts of patterned bars found in the sword. I forge welded the serpent bar overtop of the twists on one side of the blade before welding the two sides together. I apologize I don't have many photos of this all as it was a frantic and busy couple of days. The two core pieces next to each other. The original sword had an iron core, but I chose to forgo the added complication. Here the edge is wrapped and welded. It was much harder with home made material than it ever has been for me in modern steel. I'm not sure wether that was due to different expectations in workability or what. The tip weld was nearly the breaking point when I thought I had failed. Some of the pattern peeking through in the scale as I forged the fuller. The original had an iron inlay which was hard to make out. Mikko Moilanen was incredibly generous with his research and has some information on this piece in his dissertation. Skip forward a few crazy minutes and you get to the final moment. The blade was quenched in water and survived! The moon steel sword had hardened nicely. During grinding the blades edges sparked similarly to 1095 or w2 which was a huge surprise as I had never made home made steel that nice before. All of you here know the arduous process that is hand polishing. I wish I had ground it perfectly to 400 grit and polished 320 400 and then 600 and called it a day, but I don't use jigs or fixtures or whatever so I relied on free handing the rest of the geometries. This is scary and also not fun. I ground the blade near sharp at 36 grit and left it there, and polished by hand the rest of the way. This was awful, but worth it, because when I was done and left the blade in the ferric I saw something that made the years work worth it. I had finished the blade but any good blade needs a handle! I contacted my friend Matt and asked if he would be willing to make the fittings for the blade. He agreed and I sent him a photo that was included in a huge set of files from the National Museum of Sweden that he had previously sent me. The museum took wonderful photos of the sword from Vallstenarum. This was the hilt I wanted for my sword and so Matt created beautiful waxes based exactly on the original. The hilt is from a burial in Gotland and features a fabricated and rather botched ring assembly that was certainly not original to the sword. Matt began carving and in an unimaginably small amount of time was able to craft all of the parts needed for the sword and cast them. I went over to his house and we began fitting, drilling, filing, polishing, and assembling all of the parts. We did a huge amount of work and then I took most of the grip home to create the wooden components while Matt finished the pommel assembly. I carved the wooden grip and when I came back a few days later, we spent an afternoon finishing the sword. I had crafted a makeshift sheath which turned out to be hugely helpful in letting us hold the sword for finishing I brought the sword home and began finishing the sheath and the small details so that it would be ready for my gallery show. I forgot to mention I also put together a gallery show for my thesis! That was a lot of work. I had a small space that I filled with several swords and photos on the walls, and cases full of work and some artifacts. I'm sure you guys will recognize some of the pieces! I had to do a loooooot of borrowing to have enough to show I had a case full of some kitchen knives and miscellaneous pieces as well as a belt made with Matt's castings and some artifacts and the pieces they inspired. The center piece! A bit of a story board. A hammer made by Ilya, the one I use for everything along with some parts of the process. Admiring the work! The turn out for the show was far greater than I had anticipated, and it was a huge amount of fun to see so many familiar faces all in the same place. Thank you to everyone here who has inspired me to undertake this journeying to the people who made it possible, both with help researching and experimenting and with distractions or encouragement. Now my hands are starting to itch again, time to get busy!
  3. 15 points
    Hello! this is The Moon's Daughter, a type XVIII b sword that we started in the May Sword Reflections class of Tannery Pond with Zack Jonas and Peter Jonnhson. finally we finished it. is a pattern welded sword. (1095/1070) the thickness at the cross is 6 mm and the width is 47 mm. The length of the blade is 94 cm and it is 118 in total length. is built following the guidelines dictated by Peter J for the class, many thanks to PJ, ZJ and the classmates for such beautiful days
  4. 14 points
    I have been working on the idea of this for a while...patternwelded inlay(ish) ...this is patternweld with sterling silver spacers and inlay/
  5. 14 points
    This is lhe latest colaberation knife made by myself and Petr Florianek. Inspired by saxon swords the 11" blade and handle are made by me and the carving and Sterling silver handle ornamentation is by Petr. going for the bling bling! Hope you like it.
  6. 14 points
    Forging the Blade The raw material for this blade spent most of the last century on a former homestead. A large portion of the steel was used for another blade, this was the piece cut from half of the left side. Slowly drying the clay for yaki-ire over the embers in the charcoal forge. After yaki-ire, an #80 grit Sun Tiger stone reveals the approximate hamon as the geometry is set. Habaki Habaki forged to shape in preparation for silver soldering in the charcoal forge. The habaki is textured with files and patinated using a blend of copper salts similar to rokusho. Ireko Saya A two part black buffalo horn (ura) and blond cow horn (omote) lock keeps the two halves aligned when joined. The omote half contains the edge entirely and has an oil collecting reservoir at the tip. The ura half does not contain the edge, keeping it entirely in the omote half. Kataki Tsuka & Saya The hardwood block is split and carved out to fit the ireko saya and the tang and then rejoined using sokui (rice paste glue). This wood is very hard on tools and they require frequent sharpening. Nori-urushi, a mixture of natural urushi lacquer and sokui is used to reinforce certain areas, particularly the koiguchi where the wood is thinner. Mixing the urushi and sokui along with a bit of extra water to help it cure inside the joint. It can take at least a month to fully cure nori-urushi inside a wood joint, more time is better for strength. After the nori-urushi is fully cured the tsuka and saya are shaped with kanna and smoothed with fine rasps and the horn mekugi peg is fitted. An antler crown and tip are used to form a very organic kurikata (栗形, a cord loop) and obidome (帯留, “belt stop”), usually called kaerizuno (返角, “turn-back horn”). The antler kurikata is fit to the saya using a carved sliding dovetail, with no room to spare! The kurikata slides in from one side and then tightens as it reaches the final position. The obidome has a tenon that fits into a mortise carved in the saya, again carved right to the ireko saya. The obidome/kaerizuno will be attached with sokui after the saya is lacquered. In preparation for lacquering, the open grain is cleared of dust using a stiff brush. Ready for fukiurushi, the thin layer of wiped on urushi will preserve the interesting surface texture of the wood. After the lacquer has cured the surface has become a rich, glossy dark chocolate colour. Polishing Once all the parts are made and fitted the blade can be taken through the final polishing stages using Japanese waterstones. The natural #700 used to remove the last of the arato/kongo-do stone scratches. Several stones later, hazuya and jizuya fingerstones made from flakes of uchigumori-do and narutaki-do koppa attached to washi paper with natural urushi are used to even the surface and add depth. This stage is very time consuming as is the uchigumori-do before it. The fine surface grain of the steel brought out by the uchigumori stone throws multiple colours in sunlight. Final Assembly A look at all the koshirae parts before assembly Antler kurikata and obidome attached using sokui and tapped into place with a small mallet. Inserting the ireko saya into the koshirae. Completed aikuchi koshirae. Furusato tanto forged from reclaimed antique steel. View of the spine with peaked iori mune. Macro detail of the interesting texture of the Tshikalakala wood pores.
  7. 13 points
    Blade: 1080 & 15N20 Handle: cocobolo Fittings: 416
  8. 13 points
    All: It's been about two years since the death of my father. He died unexpectedly and suddenly. Him and I were working on our jointly owned boat in Cordova, Ak and he got a stomach ache. A few days later he was diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic Cancer. Ten days later he died. We had a few days to say goodbye. The very last beer I shared with my Dad was sitting on the flying bridge of his Boat in what was going to be his retirement home in Florida. I asked him what he wanted done at his funeral. In my Dad's characteristic humor he said he wanted me to build a Viking ship and put him on it, pushing it out to sea. i laughed and said that I'd probably go to jail for that. Then we hatched this plan. My family are commercial fishermen from Cordova, Alaska. We lived on the water. My dad always hoped he was of Viking descent. He was intensely disappointed to find out we were not when DNA tests became available. I wanted to share these pics and the video with you guys (my brothers in craftsmanship), but it was too close to the event. It was too personal. Enough time has passed, and I think it's okay to show you what we did. I say "we," because this build was like a long goodbye to my Dad. He was the woodworker. I was the metal guy. I had never built anything more complex than a small cabin out of wood. I had a lot of long conversations with him during this build. Most of them were in the form of: "I know, Dad! But we don't have time to redo that bit. Your funeral is in like seven days!" My buddy Shane Harvey designed this scale model of a Viking Longship from blueprints obtained from the Copenhagen museum in Denmark in CAD and then cut the keel and ribs on his CNC plywood cutter. He also did the dragon head and the small shields with my Dad's initials (RS) on them. The cutting of the cedar planks (each one cut on a table saw by me), the glue up, etc. took almost 20 days of intense work. I totally underestimated the amount of time it would take. All the lessons I had to learn as I went . . . Just in time I had it stained, varnished, and loaded onto my truck for the ferry ride to Cordova. We loaded the boat up with things my Dad loved. Including the very first sword I ever made when I was 12 with his help (ground from a long file), his favorite hat, a jar of peanut butter (his favorite food), and a gin and tonic in a viking horn (not traditional, but it was his drink). And then we set it on fire. It burned until it swamped, and then we sunk it in a bay that he loved. Anyway, hope you like the build. It's not a blade, but I know you guys well enough to know you'll be okay with this off topic post. Cheers, Dave PS: Drone footage by Shane Harvey.
  9. 12 points
    hi everyone! Alright, so I'm spending somewhat of an eternity working on the sheath of this thing - so I've decided to post at least half of the thing... the knife itself. Let me present - Draumr Gripnir - the "Dream Grip" - with some unintended fingermarks and all! Blade in two bars of folded and twisted railroad steel, with a third bar (edge) of 15n20 and ferrier's rasps. Handle i copper, brass, camel bone and vulcanized fiber. The runes engraved in the brass reads "keep your blade sharp, but your mind sharper". The nut on the end really tested my skills as an aspiring "jewler". Anyhow - sheath and complete measurements to come. Needless to say, this is one heavy knife due to the massive materials in the handle. Sincerely, Alveprins.
  10. 12 points
    First go at one if these, just too cool not to try. had some issues that were mostly as a result of rushing or not paying attention but I’m happy with it over all. Would like to make another with some twists and stuff. Inlay on the socket would be cool too but I only have so much patience! wrought socket and core, wrought and mild teeth, en42j and 15N20 edge.
  11. 12 points
    It only took 5-6 years. The blade is a two-core interrupted twist. The handle is sea cow bone, the fittings are about 2lbs of silver with niello inlay, and there are two opals set into the sheath, which is the same from front to back. The stand is black walnut.
  12. 12 points
    Hi all! After a long time I signed there because I made new knife which is available. It is small knife overall lenght is 22,5 cm, blade 10 cm and handle 12,5. Welded blade is forged from old, broken springs of agriculture machine and from the bearings. These springs I found unders old oaks on Kovalovec meadows. Guard is from patinated bronze and on handle is small patch of cow bone, which I found on the way to the Skalica hills. Last part I bought from my friend and it is Palisander Honduras burl wood. Hand sewn scandinavian type sheath with leather inserts in the blade part. Leather, knitted lanyard with small decoration from same wood as on handle. Price 370 USD with shipping. Paypal accepted. Contact on me: jakubpetras.noze@gmail.com
  13. 12 points
    Here's my latest... a custom order that when I drew options for the client, I labelled "insane" as it was an exercise more than anything in taking lines to an extreme. I was a little taken aback when he chose the drawing to proceed with. It has a 15" blade, is 20-3/4" in overall length, and the blade is 2.25" max width at the harpoon apex. It features a 9 bar pattern-weld blade, in turkish/serpents composite with explosion pattern bars for the clip and dropped edge. Completing the package are a 954 aluminum bronze guard, sculpted grenadilla handle, and 954 bronze nut for the through tang-construction. It is 1 lb. 12.3 oz. in total weight, and balanced to CHOP. Pics and a vid! Thanks for checking it out!
  14. 11 points
    Finished another folder. Little bitty bugger, 2.5" / 63mm closed, 4.5" / 112mm open. O-1, brass liners, nickel silver bolsters and pins, ebony scales. Still needs an edge and some cleanup, but it's assembled.
  15. 11 points
    Hello everyone, The last month or so I have been working on a Damascus hunting knife with a stabilized beech handle. Since I am taking pictures for my Instagram account anyway, I figured it would be nice to post this on the ‘’old fashioned’’ forums as well. For this hunting knife I am going for a more traditional design than I would normally do, this is a ‘’simple’’ drop point hunter with a guard and hopefully a takedown handle. On this knife I really want to focus on my fit and finish, normally one of my weaker points in knifemaking. As I normally make historically inspired knives doing a modern knife comes with a lot of firsts and I have really enjoyed working on it so far. For instance: this is the first time I’m trying sweeping plunges, a takedown design or working with stabilized wood. I went through several different designs and did a lot of tweaking to get this knife exactly where I want it. Carbon tracing paper is a huge help in trying out different handle shapes. The blade material is 450 layer random pattern Damascus, the steels are O2 and 75Ni8. To test if the grind lines I’d drawn were actually possible I ground a test knife out of mild steel, the plunges turned out to not be as difficult as I had feared. The mild steel also made a great template to use when forging. Normally I would forge closer to shape, but I didn’t want to risk a stray hammer blow messing up my plunges. After a bit of grinding I heat treated the blade to +- 61 Hrc and tempered the spine and ricasso back with a torch, this gives extra toughness and also allows me to file in my tang shoulders very precisely. I tend to do most of my grinding post Heat treat, the O2 is deep hardening enough and with fresh belts there is not much risk involved. After the knife is ground, I start on the fittings, there is a guard and two spacers, the middle spacer is bronze I cast myself and the other is mild steel. The spacer assembly is held together with drilled and reamed pins, a bit of extra work, but it makes alignment very easy. A threaded piece is silver brazed to the tang, I made a bronze nut for it on my lathe to keep the entire assembly together. This allows me to pull the knife apart as many times as I want, when the knife is finished this will make re-finishing a lot easier also. The handle is made from spalted beech wood, this stabilized wood is very nice to work with, and just needs a buff to get to a nice shine. The only downside is that it really stinks when grinding. From here on it was a lot of boring polishing to get the surfaces good enough. The last thing is sharpening and making a leather sheath, and it is time to take some pictures with an actual camera.
  16. 11 points
    Finished this just this afternoon. Haven't put an edge on it yet, but just couldn't wait to show it off! Time for critiques.
  17. 11 points
    When I first got interested in mustard patinas, I asked around how it was done and the answer I got was "you put mustard on the blade". While I understand it meant there was no wrong ways to do it, I was hoping for a bit more details . Now that I've done a few patinas and had A LOT of requests on how I get this stonewashed look, I'm going to give you the details in this short tutorial. This bladesport'ish blade was not intended to have a patina but it was the only one I had around that's large enough for a good demo. In case you wondered, it is 80CrV2 steel. This patina will work pretty good on any simple carbon or tool steels, as long as they don't contain too much nickel like 15n20 or L6. The nickel increases the steel's resistance to acid. So, what I first do is hand sand the blade to #800. It may not be necessary but I like how, after the patina is done, the blade is still shiny from a certain angle of view and shows how good the finish is. After the blade is finished and cleaned with acetone or brake cleaner, I use these cotton pads to dab the mustard. Only a small amount of mustard is necessary. The thinner the layer, the darker the finish. I dab a LOT to get an even layout. Now is the time to let it dry. Wait at least 30 minutes. Then clean thoroughly in soapy water and dry. Here's what it looks like after just one layer. You may be satisfied and stop there or do a second layer for a darker and more homogeneous finish. Everywhere there was tiny mustard spikes is where the blade did barely etch and shows those lighter spots. Now a second coat. And how it looks after a good cleaning. I have found that applying a thin film of food grade mineral oil darkens the finish even further. It's not been applied yet on these photos. If you have any questions, please ask and I'll update the tutorial if needed.
  18. 11 points
    My latest... I tried a lot of new stuff on it, which mostly worked out. I tried hard to minimize struggling edges... 15" dagger, midrib blade in Zanjir multibar pattern weld with turkish cores and explosion edges. Ball guard and wheel pommel in low layer pattern weld. Grip in "cage of bars" style with twisted pattern bars over leather wrapped walnut core, based an ancient hand and a half sword of Oakshotte XV typology. Through-tang peened construction with two-piece ferrules and peen block of parkerized iron. 21.5" overall, 1 lb. 8 oz. in weight. Pics and a vid... hope you like!
  19. 11 points
    As the title suggests, here is a variation on a theme. People like what they like, and it seems I have a few knives that people really like. That's fine, I enjoy making them, and I still exercise a little bit of creativity in each one. Although I totally forgot to put my makers mark on this knife, which pisses me off, but you know, it could be worse. It's really not hard to tell it is something I made... Anyhow, it is made from Aldo's 1075, which I really dig. Beaten copper, and a gorgeous piece of Desert Ironwood to finish it off. I wish pictures could do the wood justice. It glows in the light. Good stuff. Blade is 4.25" (10.8 cm) with a total length of 9.25" (22.9 cm). Hope you like.
  20. 11 points
    This was a very pleasant commission to work on for me. I could practice a little more of inlaying and the results got better than i could anticipate, even if I have much to evolve in this art. The blade was mostly done by stock removal, but the tip and the tang were forged prior to the grinding. It was made using 1070 steel. The hilt is of a variation of Petersen's type L and it's components are made in mild steel and the inlays are nickel silver. The twisted wires are also nickel silver. It was then oil coated and lightly heated to make it look darker, so the contrast with the cooper-alloy would be even more visible. It is also a good way to prevent rust. My signature this time went on the inside of the lower guard, as the blade carries my maker's name. And on the pommel is asymmetrical in decoration: one side carries a similar decoration to the guards and the other a "double Týr" bind rune. The idea of peening it on the pommel cap is also a historical method, but I made it mainly because it would be more secure than peening the upper guard and attaching the pommel cap to it. The handle is pine wood wrapped in cord and then covered with pig skin. The scabbard is also pinewood, as well as it's belt-bridge. It is lined inside with natural wool and covered with linen cloth. The chape is also mild steel and the bridge is held by leather strips. All the decorations were made to fit a late ninth century fashion, although it is a simplification of the Borre style rather than a more elaborate version. The runes on the blade are inspired mainly on inscriptions of later, 10th and 11th century blades commonly made in Latin language such as Ingelri or Gecelin, but also inspired on the famous Tizona of El Cid and the Cortana from the legend of Holger Danske when it comes in the naming process of it. The use of the runes or local language was a choice of the owner, although I'm aware of only a single sword with runic inscriptions from the period (according to Petersen, B1622), but I have no access to what is written on this exemplar. They read: ik er ulfsmoþRin (Ek er UlfsmóðrRinn - I am the Wrath of the Wolf) hioruarþR kirosi mik (Hjörvarðr gerosi mek - Hjörvarðr made me) They are all written in old norse and I used the danish long-twig young futhork to write them. The sword was exposed at one of the biggest blade shows here in Brazil, where it was awarded the prize of Best Sword of the show and is indeed a proud weapon to display, as well as is swift and powerful to wield. As usual, I wrote a short tale for this blade that can be read here: http://vferreiraarruda.blogspot.com.br/2017/08/ulfsmor-wrath-of-wolf.html I hope you like it. And here are the stats of it. Overall length: 94,0cm Blade length: 79,7cm Blade width: 5,4cm Blade thickness at the guard: 0,5cm PoB: 17,2cm Length of the grip: 10,3cm Weight: 1,150kg
  21. 11 points
    Sorry man. Locking this thread. This ain't a politics forum. It's a forum for makers who meet on the accorded neutral ground of creativity and craftsmanship. We leave our politics and flame wars at the door on the way in. Our founder, Don Fogg, set this tone from the beginning and we maintain that position. Cheers, Dave
  22. 10 points
    Antiquity and Early Middle Ages, axes. Four of the engravings are forged from old-welded iron.
  23. 10 points
    Finished this today. 10.5 inch blade forged from a 7 layer billet of bandsaw blade, horseshoe rasp and center core of chainsaw bar that hardened nicely. Guard is a scrap of 300 layer, spacer blade material, and buttcap an endcut from a radial pattern billet I made forever ago. Handle African blackwood. Through tang construction with a nut welded underside the buttcap to squeeze it all together. Had to try fullers after seeing Jason Knight grind them into an apocalypse tanto in one of his recent youtube videos. Thanks for looking, Clint
  24. 10 points
    I'm on day 27 of not leaving my property. Thank god I've got a blade project to putter with. Here is a blade I just finished grinding/etching. I started it up in Alaska last Summer and mailed it down to FL for the post heat treat work. Standard 1095/15n20 mix. Twisted crushed W's make up the alternating bars under the fuller. Edge bar is a san-mai type w/ a 1000 layer core and 200 layer wrapping. Some highlight stripes between the bars. More when the fittings and grip are applied. I'm not going to rush, however. It's the only blade I have to work on, so once it's done I'm stuck w/ just mowing the lawn and pushups for entertainment. OAL is around 16" Anyone recognize this blade shape? It may seem familiar. Grins, Dave
  25. 10 points
    Just finished this up. I'll try and get proper pics and say more about it at the weekend, but It's 1075+Cr, bogoak, steel, copper and silver: let me know what you think...
  26. 10 points
    I have made a few of these recently with riveted pivots but getting the action right is very tricky, so I have used a threaded pivot pin and nylon washers which has made a world of difference. Smooth as silk now. The blade is approx 3" and about 6 1/2" overall.
  27. 10 points
    All Finished I decided against copper spacers. I call this one "Smoke and Mirrors" I made it for my wife for Easter.
  28. 10 points
    Hello: Here is the first sword I finished in 2020...The blade is 1070..the Hamon.. well, I dunno what to call it... Togari Gunome maybe?? finished with temple lion motif fittings from my art foundry guys in Taiwan..They do a great job..yes they do!! Much better than an old ham handed reprobate like I could do..... Black samegawa under that black and gold Chevron Tsuka-ito that I adore.. This is another proto for book IV which is coming along splendidly even if I do say so myself.. The siya is black lacquer that I dripped/ "flicked" Testors model airplane paint (metallic gold) on and then sealed with 6 coats of hard, clear lac.. I got the idea from a siya that one of my friends down here showed me a while back...turned out non too shabby but there is still room to improve on that...I do know I need to find a better price on that stuff..it is $$$...Hope the photos work out... Note: This Hamon didn't turn out like I wanted.. I was going for more of a crashing/breaking ocean wave/surf sort of thing but that isn't what happened.. Like I have said before...Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted to.. Happy 2020... JPH
  29. 10 points
    I wanted to make a very traditional folder, something as traditional as quaffing mead, boar hunting, getting into a long boat and raiding the coastlines of Europe. So I designed and made a pocket seax. This is the second one, the first had the thicker, more rounded handle of a fixed blade seax, so I decided to trim the handle down while retaining a bit of a rise towards the end. This one is 4" long from bolster to the end of the lanyard loop. I am thinking of doing a smaller, 3 1/2" version as well. SAE1070 blade and spring, Brass bolsters and liners, pink ivory scales. I did the carving on the bolsters. Questions and comments welcome!
  30. 10 points
    How to Carve Netsuke and Miniature Sculpture: Free PDF Download This is a link to a detailed 361 page instruction book on how to carve netsuke and miniature sculpture. The file is in Adobe Acrobat PDF format.

It requires Adobe Acrobat Reader http://sterlingsculptures.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Carving_Netsuke.pdf
  31. 10 points
    For many years now I was business partners with Peter Swarz-Burt and watched him making wootz . I learned a ton from him over the years. Well Peter left the shop last June,moved to HI infact. After peter left I got an order for a wootz knife . There were a few bars laying around I could use so I took the job.. the bars failed .. so I began my dissent into wootz making . This is the first piece completed from My wootz
  32. 10 points
    Hello: Been sorta busy around here with family stuff since we have a brand new granddaughter so this is something I whipped out real quick.. This one is welded from a mix of 1095, L-6 and a bit of meteoric iron thrown in ..8 1/4" Maiden Hair blade...Phosphor bronze mounts...Some of that bowling ball material for the fluted grip..This piece looks like a deep reddish maple burl! Turned out OK...at least I think so... The sheath is set with a 17.65 Ct star ruby.. cut this one myself.. All in all I think it didn't turn out too bad.. Hope the photos work... This one is website stock and is currently listed there... JPH
  33. 10 points
    This is the latest collaboration sword from myself Petr Florianek . We wanted to make another fantasy sword yet at the same time keeping a firm grip on reality. This a very much a “real” sword but also a dragon slaying hero’s sword! The sword blade takes inspiration from early Saxon blades, marrying that history into Tolkien’s middle earth and the world of the Rohirrim horse lords. The blade was made by myself and the handle and scabbard are Petr’s work. The blade takes inspiration from early Saxon patternwelded blades and has a lenticular section giving it the heft and strength needed when fighting dragons! It is important for me that anything I make has a functional reality to it. A reality based upon the imagined purpose of the object . This is the sword of a mighty horselord hero with the pride and fate of his people behind him. A sword for battling a dragon. Bryneleoma has a patternwelded blade 3 core bars twisted anticlockwise, clockwise and anticlockwise, the core bars are wrapped in a high layer damascus edge . The bold core pattern contrasting the fine layers of the edge. In Petr’s words… I wanted to make a truly heroic sword and when given Owen’s mighty blade, I had enough inspiration to get the feel of it. The blade is hefty and long so I immediately started to picture a mounted warrior; a hero on a horse, a proto knight if you will. The inspiration for this sword is firmly set in Tolkien’s Middle Earth, in the world of the Rohirrim horse lord. The motives for ornamentation are simple – he dragon on the pommel as the most powerful enemy but also a symbol to ward off evil. On the handle a series of knots representing fate being spun by higher beings. The knot on the guard symbolises oath, the oath of the horse lord bound to his people as their protector. An oath from sword to swordsman, the guard of the sword being there to protect its heroic master. I love doing these pieces with Petr, and always look forward to getting the finished piece. He has a way of bringing a blade to life.....
  34. 10 points
    Hunter , 1095, brass, leather, deer antler, total length 25.5 cm blade 13 cm.
  35. 10 points
    It seems Brian and I both had the idea to follow Steve Culver's instruction book on how to built a slipjoint folder without making patterns first. Like Brian, I know this is not going to be my last one! This one is bound for Knife in the Hat, and I will use what I learned making it to make the next one even better. Specs: Blade and backspring, 3/32" precision ground O-1 flat bar Brass liners with Nickel Silver bolsters and pins. Jigged bone scales from Culpepper & Co., Amber dyed, Catalina pattern. Open length 5 7/8" / 147mm, blade length 2 5/8" / 66mm. Closed length 3 1/4" / 82mm Maximum thickness 3/8" / 11mm I made two changes from Culver's design. I omitted the scale pin near the peak of the liners because I thought it was unnecessary and distracting, and I rounded the tang because I've never liked a knife with a half-stop. It just seems ridiculous to me and serves no purpose except to break your thumbnail if the spring is too strong. Speaking of which, I am really happy with the spring. It isn't too heavy, and the knife snaps open and closed with authority. The judge of how strong to make the spring is my wife, if she thinks it's too strong, back to the grinder! It feels much like any good factory knife of its size, spring strength-wise. And now for the pics! The problems I had with this one: 1. The pivot pin is not invisible on one side. 2. The blade is not dead center when closed. 3. A minor slip at the grinder moved the left-hand plunge line back into the kick. 4. While soldering the bolsters, the scribed line on the right bolster was not where I thought it was, resulting in a mismatch between the two sides. Much colorful language and careful filing followed. There has been a bit more cleanup on it after these pics were taken, mostly to remove that facet on the underside of the bolsters. I also engraved that spot with my initials since I forgot to do the blade prior to hardening...
  36. 10 points
    Id like to credit this award to all the foundation work and help i acquired over the last couple years directly from this forum! Without you guys I don't know how far i would have progressed but i wouldn't be where i'm at for sure. Anyway, Im still in shock. I wanted to show and give credit to Alan and salem and the other 100 guys on here that have given me A LOTTTT of their time answering dumb questions. Also, to encourage the newer guys to keep cranking out stuff and trying and making knives! 320 layers Laddered (appears random until you see the chatoyance) -trippy forged integral 2.5" tall at the heel 9.25" long Amboyna 5 stack of g10 spacers 5.5 oz
  37. 10 points
    Don gave me this blade five or six years ago and said, "Make something beautiful with it". Hmm, ok, so it rumbled around in my mind until last fall. It was a slow process figuring out the transition, theme and all the details, but I think it came good in the end. I didn't find out until it was almost finished that it was Don's last patterned blade. I knew it had to be one of the last, but THE last. I'm glad I didn't know as I was working on it. Below is a little of what I've written. More to be read here: Kelso Journal And a slide show with more photos here: Fogg/Kelso In keeping with the persona of a hunting knife, I chose to represent features of the Vermont woodlands that would be familiar to a skilled, observant woodsman. These include tracks of the Red Fox, leaves of Red Maple, Beech, and Red and White Oaks, and a feather. The feather was modeled from the Ruffed Grouse, but altered in shape and color to fit the surroundings. I chose a feather as a sign of passage, which in the case of birds, could be molting, conflict, flight or death. Feathers have such deep and subtle beauty. My wife Jean and I have a collection and I always wonder, when finding a single feather, what the story was. The tracks, leaves and feather are all signs, marking activity and transition, the meaning of which is read by the skilled woodsman. This project has been very satisfying for a number of reasons. I was touched and honored when Don gave me the blade to finish. I did not realize until the piece was nearly finished that it was his last patterned blade, which greatly enhances the meaning for me. Don is a legend in the smithing world, and rightly so. Apart from his technical innovations, he has an artistic eye, both for pattern and form, which is rarely, if ever matched. In addition, his Bladesmith’s Forum stands as an unparalleled online resource for beginning and accomplished knifemakers.
  38. 10 points
    Let me present Roðinn Hrafn - the Red or "Bloodstained Raven". Blade in folded and twisted railroad steel, in a san-mai lamination with Øberg steel for the core. Handle in stabilized Maple, with Holly for the core, copper, brass and vulcanized fiber. The Holly is engraved with Elder Futhark runes - written in old Norse - and filled with ashes. Any and all critique, is ... as always - most welcome. :) Sincerely, Alveprins.
  39. 10 points
    Hey everyone! I finished this piece a few days ago, so I took some photos and thought I would share! This began as a small billet for a demo at NESM for their annual hammer in, and upon finishing the blade a client signed onto the project, so I designed the hilt and we went from there! I still have to make the sheath, and when it's done I'll update this thread. The blade is seven bars of pattern weld, wrought iron on the spine, four twisted bars, more wrought iron, and then an edge of ~400 layers. The handle is moose antler, bog oak, silver, wrought iron, and rubies. I guess I'll do the usual and post a few finished photos and then a WIP! WIP time! So this piece started off as a billet about 8 inches long. I twisted everything extremely tight and laid up the wrought iron and edge bar. I tacked the billet on one end and brought it to Maine with me. I was invited to demonstrate on both days, and first gave a lecture on the historical seax and then did a practical demo the next day, forging a long seax. I then brought the blade to Zack Jonas' workshop a while after it was finished and began to work out what the design should be. Drawing from a few different artifacts I designed something that intrigued me. I used a few drill bits and a set of needle rasps to get the bolster fit properly. Here you can see the fit bolster next to the sawn bog oak and the drawing I made for the client. I used the needle rasps to file and clean up the slot for the tang to seat in the wood properly which is a new trick, I promptly went and bought my own set after! That's as far as I got at Zack's, and upon returning home I began to shape the handle. I always do my rough shaping on the belt grinder to establish the lines I am after and then use files or sandpaper to refine the shape. In this case I am going for a slight hourglass shape and need to do some careful firework to establish my lines. After about an hour the work is done and I can polish to about 400 grit in preparation for the rest of the detailing. At this point I figured I would set the half moon shape on the bolster as per my design. I did this freehand on the grinder and then polished with some paper on a flat surface. Here you can see there is a slight inletting in the edge side of the bolster to allow the blade to sit better. I used a jewelers saw to begin the cuts for the silver wire and then a series of files and rasps to make the recess for the wire. After some epoxy and a few wracked nerves the silver is in place. I couldn't remember what size bezel wire I had used in the past on the amber seax, but I did some experimenting and figured it out. Here's the piece next to the scaled up drawing I made to keep with me as I was working. I think I'll start doing this more in the future. I cut out the piece of fine silver and annealed it, then bent it to shape on the back end of the bog oak grip, and because it was so soft it readily accepted its new shape. I took some nice wrought iron I had and cut a small coupon off and drilled and filed a hole to fit it to the tang. My original thought was to make the pommel just a cap and not be held on by the tang, but Peter convinced me I should weld an extension to the tang and peen the pommel on. Here I am using sharpie to get a vague idea of where I should grind to. I never really do this sort of work with a caliper and exact measurements, instead using my eye to get things close. I may change this some day and do more exact work, but for the style of work I do I feel that this gives my work a more 'organic' nature. I roughed in the shape on the grinder and then drilled my holes. I probably would change the order of operations next time. Once the pommel was roughly fit I began to tune the shape with files. Eventually I ended up with this. I began to peen the bezels in place from the inside to hold them properly. I did all of the setting work before attaching to the handle so I could burnish all the way around easily. Once the rubies were set I peened the whole thing together after administering some epoxy. Here you can see the peen isn't cleaned up yet. After some careful belt grinding and 2000 grit paper to clean the peen up, I went out back behind the shop to take some photos! I hope that's helpful or at least informative, thanks for looking guys!
  40. 10 points
    I apologize again for my relative absence, I try to remember to post here but since I know so many of you outside the forum now, I tend to forget I'm sure many of you have already read this and seen the pictures, but for my friends here who aren't on Facebook or Instagram, here you go I've taken the time to focus on improving my knowledge and skills this past month of September, trying to achieve some things I've never been able to do before. This started by spending an entire week in New Hampshire at Zack Jonas's shop as a student of the one and only Peter Johnsson. That week, I took a sip of knowledge from a fire hydrant of information. Peter was an insanely great teacher and was able to get some valuable ideas through even my thick skull, and I got to experience some things that will stick with me for the rest of my career, such as handling 2000+ year old swords, knives, and scabbards, staying up at night having philosophical discussions around a fire... This has all been tied up into a bow with the completion of this sword. It's a British style middle La Tène era sword I've named Epona, after the Celtic goddess of horses, who undoubtedly would have been important to warfare and calvary. It's a happy coincidence that I chose the British style, since through a convoluted string of events, I recently discovered that pretty much all of my heritage comes from the British isles. The blade is a lenticular cross section pattern welded blade, made from a mix of high carbon steel and old wrought iron in the core, and high layer Damascus edges forge welded to the softer core. The hilt is made from ancient bog oak graciously given to me by my good friends Dave Delagardelle and Tony Greenly, and the spacers are bronze in a stacked construction, just like the ancient British swords. During the finishing phase of this project, I spent about as much time wearing an optiviser as I spent without one. I put more skill and attention to detail into this piece than I have on anything I've ever made, and I feel that it marks a new era in the quality of my work. Thanks for reading everyone! If you've read this far, thanks a lot! Let me know if you've got any questions, critiques, comments, etc!
  41. 10 points
    Hi All! Haven't been here for some time... I've been learning, and improving skills Here there is a scramasax forged out of 5 bars: 3 x twisted rods (45/68/45 layers) + spine and cutting edge of 80CrV2. The handle is made with bronze spacers, deer antler, pear wood and black leather spacer. The "eye" on the butt is brass riveted and soldered from beneath. Overall len.: 515mm/20,27" Blade len.: 323mm/12,71" Handle len.: 184mm/7,24" Width: at handle: 33,5mm/1,32", at widst point: 35mm/1,38" Thickness: 5,5mm/0,22" Weight: 483g/17oz Let's save the words, pictures show some stages of work
  42. 10 points
  43. 10 points
    Hi all ! It's my first post on this forum so I wanted to say hello and show you my pattern welded seax which I finished few days ago. Total length 47cm, blade 32cm Width 3,2 cm Maciej Leszczyński - Kuźnia Wilkowo
  44. 10 points
    As we look Back it is always hard to tell if such a knife was made for a Dwarven Hero or for a Hero of Men, often these details are lost in the mists of time and imagination. Either way this is a stout stedfast and robust knife (certainly Dwarven made) perfect for heroic undertakings, expeditions in search of gold and adventures beyond the realms of men. “If hunting Warg, or tracking Dragons,a stout knife is always a benefit. Keen of edge , a true stroke struck will not be repelled by the stoutest hide. But after the adventuring is done and mead is flowing. When the fire is sizzling with aromas , the hunters legacy roasting….Then tales are told and knives passed around the hall, adornment , edge and jewel reflected glittering in the firelight. The deeds of the day become bigger , wolves become wargs and tall tales become legends. The knife blade is made by me and the handle, sheath and all the other lovley bits are made by Petr Florianek (Gullinbursti) ( This 12” bladed knife is forged from 4 bars of patternweld, there is wrought iron on the spine and 2 bars of 5 later twisted steel. The edge is 300 layers of folded damascus steel, the swirls in the pattern showing the multitude of hammer striked used to forge the blade. The knife adorned with carved brass and antler, silver and garnet. Fierce beasts are carved into the handle and a Dragon writhes carved amidst the brass and garnets.
  45. 9 points
    I've been working on a pipe tomahawk head and finished up the filing on Sunday. After taking the last few strokes with a 3" needle file, and seeing the 16" mill bastard next to it, I thought it would be of interest to some to see the results of drawfiling the way I do, the end result, and every single file I used on the project. First, drawfiling. For hawk heads, there's really not a good way to finish them totally on the grinder because of all the odd curves and stepped lines. Well, maybe if I had a small wheel attachment, but not as I am currently set up. I forge to shape, remove the scale and rough profile with an angle grinder, then use the belt grinder to rough in the surfaces, although it's not strictly necessary. Once the scale is gone you can jump straight to filing, I made hawks that way for eight years before I got the belt grinder. Once I have it as flat as it's gonna be on the belt grinder (36, 60, and 80 grit zirconia followed by A300, A160, A65, and A45 trizact), it's time to drawfile. I start with the 16" mill bastard, which immediately shows where the belt grinder did not make it truly flat. Then to the 12" mill bastard, then on to the six-inchers. Mill bastard, Mill 2nd cut, then mill smooth. After the last strokes with the 6" mill smooth, it's ready for 220-grit paper. I originally took this picture to show the carbon migration from the 1084 edge steel to the wrought iron body, but then I realized I had never posted a picture of a properly drawfiled surface. There are still a couple of 36-grit scratches on the edge steel, but that will be ground away after heat treat. Yes, this is not yet hardened. Also, I should mention if you don't have a belt grinder you can do the entire thing with files. Just takes a little longer. Next, here is the result of all the filing, both draw and push. See what I mean about things you can't do with a belt grinder? Every last bit of surface you see is the result of filing. There was a lathe involved in creating the bowl, but files were used on the bowl while it was in the lathe chuck as well. Note this is as-filed, it has not been sandpapered yet. Well, the molding between eye and blade has been cleaned up with a 1/2" sanding drum for a Dremel, but that's it. Finally, the files used in making this hawk: From the left, we have the 16" mill bastard with one edge ground safe (heavy stock removal and rapid drawfileing), the 1/4" chainsaw (setting some of the curves on the lathe), a 14" long-angle lathe file (fast stock removal push-filing, tends to leave a smoother surface than the 16" mill) 12" round file (lathe work), 12" mill bastard for intermediate smoothing, 8" half-round for setting the transition from eye to blade and shaping that little step on the bottom, the three six-inch mill files (bastard with safe edge, 2nd cut, and smooth), two 6" three-squares, one slim and one XX-slim with a safe edge (these were used to make the grooves and clean up the inside corners on the bowl), and finally, the 3" round needle file that was used to clean up the grooves. The 16" is the workhorse of the family. Used as a push file it cut the shoulders on the transition and the V on the eye. As a draw file it flattened and blended the blade. The long-angle lathe file has two safe edges (meant to be used on the lathe, it won't mar the chuck). The round file and big chainsaw file clean up my sloppy lathework on the neck of the bowl. The other bastard files are just used to clean up after the one before. The three-square XX-slim with one face ground smooth can cut dovetails, but it also acts like a knife to cut very sharp straight lines for the grooves. The slim three-square follows those lines to widen and deepen the cut, and the needle file removes the coarser marks of the bigger files. And that's only about a quarter of my file collection...
  46. 9 points
    Blade: W1 Spinal Wrap: Damascus Handle: Desert Ironwood w/ Fossil Walrus Ivory Spacer Fittings: 416
  47. 9 points
    My latest sword a patternwelded single edged viking with patternwelded fittings. hope you like it. stay safe out there.
  48. 9 points
    Hello.... For over 11 years I have been working on traditional Japanese edged weapon, specifically grinding and polishing blades and making rim of swords. I use traditional materials and their modern modified analogues. Forging and heat treatment of blades are done by my friend Dmitry, he is a professional blacksmith and gunsmith with experience over 10 years. Since 2016, i began making art knives, in the styles: cyberpunk / bio-mechanics, using some of the best materials and precious metals. I try to do all the work in the highest quality, studying new technologies and do various experiments with design. Showing my last work, just as interesting, I will show my later work ... Aikuchi "The Black Moon" Authors: Daniil Izotov / Dmitry Chebukin. Blade: steel 9xs, 305/30/5 mm (length with handle 45 cm, in sheath 49)traditional grinding / polishing. Frame: magnolia, epoxy enamel, silver, copper. Sageo cord, kara-kumi weaving style.
  49. 9 points
    I didn't get in much shop time today but did manage to get the first of eight dogwood flowers roughed out. These will all get inlaid side-by-side into a billet of 1084 using a canoe & 1084 powder.
  50. 9 points
    Here's my finished Arkansas Toothpick/Dagger: Custom Damascus, stabilized mastodon ivory bark, 416 stainless w/blade steel inlays:
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