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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/18/2022 in all areas

  1. 1080/15N20 forged by maker, eyed crushed W's with stainless fittings and a Walrus handle.
    7 points
  2. I etched the end grains of two bars I forged out yesterday. Planning to try my hand at mosaics
    6 points
  3. This is my most prized piece to date. I’m just 1 year into physically bladesmithing. I’ve been studying and reading for about 5 years. Minimal tools in my shop, no press or power hammers. A home built 2x72. Critique is welcomed
    6 points
  4. Alright, finally managed to get the handle together and finalized the damn thing with a pommel nut today. My 2nd pommel nut ever, and first in pattern welded steel w. gold inlay. So, the handle wood is stabilized maple, with 925 silver and vulcanized fiber spacers. The bolster, pommel and mid-section are forged from railroad steel, engraved in a deep relief with 24k. gold inlay and set with two 0.03ct diamonds, four rubies and four sapphires. The runes of bolster and pommel reads: Hrothlitnir synir Sons of the Famous Wolf Skol ok Hati Skol a
    5 points
  5. I took the day off and spent some time forging. A day's work in four photos. It doesn't look like much, but it sure feels like a lot.
    5 points
  6. Forged this last weekend to see if the shop gremlins were still active. Cleaned it up yesterday. Did the HT this morning, and since I unexpectedly had the rest of the day free, went ahead and hafted it. Needs some work on the bevel to blend everything. Mild steel body, file edge with teeth (they'll show up as it ages), curly ash handle. Wood finished natural with boiled linseed oil to bring up the stripes. This is some nice ash, I'll be sad when it's all gone.
    5 points
  7. Hi, i finally finished another long time project. Rohirrim spear. It is made of k720 steel and wrought iron. Horse heads are bronze, silver inlayed and they are brazed to the socket. I hope you will like it!
    5 points
  8. Those are quite cool. Gotta ask, what's with the bottom one? Today I sorta finished(will need touch ups) the first chef blade of the pair. I started to machine the bolster but I realized it was too narrow and I'm going to have to start over...no big deal.
    4 points
  9. This is my 4th knife. Thanks to the advice earlier in the build I finally finished my Sgian. Blade is 1084. Bolsters are copper from my great grandfather soldering iron which I blacked (only partially successfully it left a bit of corrosion on the blade and may have another go) and peened the front to hide a multitude of sins. Handle is Australian Blackwood from my childhood property and a brass pin. Stone was found on my favorite stream. Now I have to work out a sheath. Thanks again, advice or hint aprechiated.
    4 points
  10. Had some down time this afternoon in between projects. Threw this together as a thank you to the buddy that donated the .30-06 brass for my most recent build. Pretty simple really, but a nice little distraction from flat surfaces and sharp edges.
    4 points
  11. This one has an 8670 carbon steel blade, India rosewood scales, and steel pins. It’s almost ready for it’s sheath.
    4 points
  12. Recently finished this one up for a buddy of mine. Blade is 1/8" thick 1084/15N20 san-mai. Didn't get as much differentiation between the layers as I would have liked , but you can see the transition if you look closely enough. The main handle wood is Walnut that was harvested from an original M1 Garand stock, with African Blackwood and brass fittings. .30-06 shell casing inlaid into the pommel. It's also the first blade that I've ever marked.
    4 points
  13. Great job on All of these,Faye,good for you for persevering,and working your way through the inevitable challenges.Right on. All of the axes above would sooner qualify as "poll-less". That extra mass at the poll is fairly difficult to come by in a folded-type of pre-form. It Was done,but the starting stock would have to be 1" thick minimum,or even better. Alternatively,that mass was added by welding on an extra piece,or in later years by slitting&drifting the eye. It's a very odd idea to use an axe in butchering game in the field. It ruins the me
    4 points
  14. I'm not particularly sure what to call this seax, but the goal was to make this a seax that would have been accessible to the normal everyday person. I had a lot of fun and learned a lot from this, hopefully many more to come! Forged from 1065, and I did clay it but less for any real reason and more for practice mixing, applying, and working with a clayed blade. Handle is made out of burn-pile rescue Madrone, so it did have some checking in it, but I'm not too worried and it's not big enough to cause any pinching in the hand. I added a bolster of antler fr
    4 points
  15. My pleasure, and thank you. I hope y'all don't mind that I'm taking my sweet time Today my plan was simply to draw out the billet into "final" bar stock, but while heating it up I could see shadows that made it clear my kobuse weld had cavities. I spent another hour in and out of forge welding temp to try to fix that. I got really concerned with a blister I just couldn't close up. I've dealt with trapped flux before by punching through an outer layer with a hammer eye punch, but I didn't want to cause a blemish on the hada (final blade pattern). I resorted to something that might
    3 points
  16. For a while I’ve wondered if I could make a “dishwasher resistant” knife. A quick look around found advice for how to do it, but didn’t see any actual knives, though I’m sure it’s been done. I decided to get the materials and try it out for myself. I made one knife to test for a few months and one as a gift for someone who isn’t the best at caring for knives. The blades are AEB-L, with a machine finish buffed to a high satin. The handles are paper micarta. At first I thought it was a little funny but I actually like the red. The handles are attached with the only stainless cutle
    3 points
  17. So far I have (pretty much) only good things to say about the steel, it was fine to grind, even when fully hardened. The corrosion resistance has been pretty impressive, not staining at all from limes, tomatoes, onions, or garlic, and also holding up through several dishwasher runs. The only hiccup is warping in the quench, despite using plates. I have 3/32” and 1/6” stock and oddly only the thicker stuff warped. I was able to remove the warps in tempering but have broken one blade already. It did more or less feel like grinding a low carbon steel. I also dropped the knife while k
    3 points
  18. The epoxy has had enough time to set, so it's time to do the first test run! Pretty much the most reactive food prep I could think of, I now how six tomatoes worth of salsa (no cilantro because it tastes like soap to me) . As advertised, the stainless steel remains unstained. The food release was ok, but I still want better. The grind is convex with a fair amount of asymmetry (no steering that I can tell though). The edge is definitely thin enough, which I used to have a lot of trouble with. I can't remember where I saw it first, but I picked up this method from a video and it has
    3 points
  19. Subhilt fighter is the term the guy who popularized the style called them. Bob Loveless, who also popularized the drop-point hunter. I like your blade shape better than the usual recurve or bowie. I dunno, bottle openers have to be tuned to work well. Usually requires at least two beers to make sure.
    3 points
  20. Some work on what I've been calling a "fighter" knife. Goodness knows this very different from the recurved "norm", but I don't know what else to call it, lol! It's mostly an excuse to practice fullers, a flat grind, and a guard all in one. Pretty happy with how that top guard turned out, it's actually two pieces of 1/4" brass flatbar lapped to 1500 grit, pinned, and soldered. Also got a chance to work on another fun knife that has no direction in mind in particular! Playing with a threaded tang and pommel on a bit of leftover material from last year'
    3 points
  21. I kind of got this idea from David Lisch. He made this W2 blade with a round Damascus plug in it. Then he arranged the clay so the hamon looked like a mountain range. The round plug looked like the moon rising over the peaks.
    2 points
  22. Yesterday I rough ground, quenched and tempered these two knives. This is what I found this morning. Then I finished coating the big HT forge with Mizzou Now to go work on the Dirk pommel cap.........
    2 points
  23. And I thought I had a pile of wrought... That's just awe-inspiring, Jan.
    2 points
  24. It happens. Was he using a torch, or a cutoff wheel? Edit: I see EMS found "a power tool" at the scene. Torches are the most dangerous way to cut metal drums, tanks, barrels, etc. because if the flame isn't adjusted exactly right the barrel slowly fills with a mix of unburned acetylene (or propane, if you're using that) and oxygen until it reaches that point where it spontaneously goes boom. The OSHA records are full of accident reports from this. It's almost always fatal to the operator, and it happens with barrels that have no combustible contents. Guy was 21, ju
    2 points
  25. I did only two more folds before kobuse. My thinking was that on one hand I've been quite slow in my folding overall, and I suspect my rate of carbon loss is quite a bit higher than Yoshindo's, and on the other hand the steel has felt like a solid billet since fold #4. My understanding is that I'll lose some homogeneity in the carbon content by stopping at #8, but I don't dare continue to put this billet through any more high heats. Hopefully I can get away with it on this small blade. (I made this bottom tool for canisters. I've never forged a canister yet but with a 1" rou
    2 points
  26. A set for a friend / worker in the inward goods section of a natural/organic store and the lever is often used for wood boxes where the nipple nose is used against the side of cardboard boxes to prevent over penetration against the product packaging inside. The knot hook is not sharpened as in a gut hook but is used to get into knots where produce is tied with rope/string. This set is dreived from my light rescue set.
    2 points
  27. Well it’s done!!! Thank you all for your help!!
    2 points
  28. That is a horrible picture. The copper doesn't come all the way down to the edge. It is slightly above the cutting edge. The thickness of your core material and how deep you grind into your blade can definitely determine how far up your copper is on the blade. How thick of copper you use can determine how thick the copper line across your blade is. This blade I used 5/32" 1084 core and about .055 thick copper. My outside layers are Damascus that started out as 3/16" thick material. If I remember correctly my billet started out 2" wide and 7.5" long. Then with forging out the billet my co
    2 points
  29. So over the last few years I have been building the blacksmithing school. The gentleman whom has been helping me is also a forging person, and is into knives so it's been a great time. We have covered flat jaw tongs, and hot hardie. With knife making in mind we setup a time to forge a set of box jaw.. the most difficult type as well.. these are #2 in difficulty because of the small gap between the jaw pivot/boss and the jaw itself.
    2 points
  30. Some new Karelian Birch handle blocks arrived from Bogdan Drevetskiy in the Ukraine this morning. I am quite partial to the gold flecks in the blue and green blocks and the red and black will have a variagated finish that will make a nice visual on the handle. I have traded with a taxidermist friend in South Africa for these and he is just waiting on the cites paperwork before getting them away to me. Costly but my customer base loves giraffe bone with the previous lot I got being used in short order . Makes for a very nice handle either on its own or complemented with
    2 points
  31. Minor progress, and I'm not sure I like this at all. I finished the forging on the guard. Then I made and fit the 5-piece spacer package. Two twist Damascus plates and three .04" nickel-silver plates.
    2 points
  32. I have been itching to make wrought iron Dividers, Tomahawk or a Puuko. How about a Wrought Iron challenge with high carbon blade edge
    2 points
  33. So my very first hatchet attempt got seriously reprofiled after I ground down to solid welds. It's pretty but not very correct. I'm not sure if its a mutant hybrid, or if there is a technical name for something that looks like a tomahawk and has a hatchet style poll. I used red oak for the handle and used Don Abbott's iron acetate recipe to dye the stripe. The damascus turned out way cool on this one. I was thinking about keeping it, but I put a picture on my facebook page and have a couple people who want to buy it. I have a hard time selling rejects though, so it will probably end up as
    2 points
  34. The important one is done and ready to go! The eye on this one is by far the best out of the five that I made, which is maybe a little sad cause this one is still crooked. I have little doubt that it will preform very well, despite the imperfections. Thank you to everyone who imparted their wisdom, and encouragement. I greatly appreciate your help and patience.
    2 points
  35. Well, that didn't work either. Turns out my details were cut way too shallow, and any sanding wiped them out. So, I decided to skip the frills around the outer rim and cut a new model. I also had some trouble with the gate area collecting boogers, so I made a larger gate. This casting had some issues, but I decided to start cleaning it up and see how it went. A little time with some rotary burrs, a bunch of hand sanding on the granite slab, and some drilling and tapping of threads later.......
    1 point
  36. Nothing wrong with a BIG chef knife.
    1 point
  37. That is the edge lenght. Its bit hefty.
    1 point
  38. That is very good for a 4th knife! If your epoxy is good and you roughed up the stone where it contacts, you should be fine. Well, don't use it as a hammer or anything and it should be good.
    1 point
  39. I really wanna make a 2x 72...gotta ask what made ya not go that route? Thats a pretty wild lookin billet? It appears you are going to have some copper on the edge? Is that not a concern? Legit Q?...just curious. Looking fwd to what you make of this.
    1 point
  40. That's a good looking knife Alex, well done! I owe a childhood friend a knife, with a different caliber casing inlaid this would be the perfect knife for him
    1 point
  41. It's a killer knife, Curtis. Great twist, and the pattern is bold too. Like said previously, good planning in the forging process to bring the pattern up to the tip. The handle looks wonderful too. Great work!
    1 point
  42. There is,it's called a Biscayne pattern. One of world's oldest metallurgical centers,the Bay of Biscay,was the origin of those cheap "trade axes" originally imported into the New World,to eventually become what is known as a "tomahawk". Those were light,poll-less axes of different sizes and weight,heavier ones used for felling and other forestry chores(many older felling axes used on hardwood had a narrow bit,to concentrate force of impact).The smaller ones were used in orchard and vineyard work. Traditionally and to this day most of these tools had a compression-fit handle,the
    1 point
  43. This. Any time I have a "cosmetically flawed" piece, I let the buyer know and sell at a slight discount. At least enough to make back all (including machine wear) material costs and a little for time. Helps keep the hobby going (which makes me happy) and empties out the growing pile in the closet (which keeps the wife happy ). BTW, both those axes look nice.
    1 point
  44. a 1000 year old seax that has survived to this day. Love the checking in the handle to show age and pleased you havent filled it. nice bit of file work and even the sheath shows an age that is belied by your asertion that it is freshly made.
    1 point
  45. Thanks for the replies! Alan: would tooth size also be important? Some hacksaws have a large-ish set but small teeth while something like a bow saw (though I can’t say I would want to chew mine up one bone) also has much larger teeth. I can also see it being a pain to keep flat as you said. Don: nice find! I’ve bought from them before but I hadn’t noticed that. I may reach out to them as well, though those scales look pretty nice and I think I could make two scales from one of those for shorter or narrower knives. Gerhard: textured scales were a challenge for me f
    1 point
  46. My son got this Red Rider when he was a boy. He's been giving his son some highly supervised target time with it. The factory stock was proving to be too long, so I volunteered to make him a short stock for it until he grows in to the big one: I couldn't stop at a slab with eased edges... I had to go presentation grade. A cool project for a snow day.
    1 point
  47. Been working on this little guy for a while. 3" to the guard, a touch under 6" overall. Hand hammered chainsaw canister damascus filled with 1084 powder. Handle is figured walnut with the butt of the handle shaped to fit between my ring and pinkie fingers, letting the pinkie lock the handle into my hand. There is one small weld flaw up near the spine, but since I'm keeping this one I decided to finish it out anyway. Comments and critiques are always welcome. Thanks for looking!
    1 point
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