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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/11/2020 in Posts

  1. Completed last evening. Puukko: 115mm x 22mm blade with beveled spine and slight drop point. Black ash burl handle with brass bolsters and contrasting ebony.
    5 points
  2. I actually looked up how much 50lbs of silicon bronze would cost. It's less than I thought. Bronze would look really cool, especially with a patina on it. The wear marks would make it even better. Have just looked up weights. Bronze seems to be heavier than cast iron per cubic inch (.307 for bronze vs. .260 for cast iron), so the size would probably have to be reduced a bit, or a bit of a hollow left in the base. I think I could build a custom flask large enough to fit in my burn out kiln and use satin cast. Definitely can't use vacuum casting, so it would just be a gr
    4 points
  3. Another stage completed with assembly this afternoon. Marked out the front spacer in a sunburst pattern and did some filing on it, fully shaped the handle and thinned down a piece of 1/8 carbon fiber to 3/32 for the pin, blued the guard before doing the etch on the blade and epoxying it all together.
    3 points
  4. They don't pay the smiths. They give them mystery steel (or at least they used to, haven't watched in years) and then the smith's reputation gets hurt if they guess wrong and use the wrong quench. I've heard that (at least in the first couple seasons) the shop was very dangerous, with no ventilation. I've had multiple calls/emails from them and I've turned them down every time. I don't begrudge anyone who goes on the show, and it has been good in raising general interest in our craft, so those that teach bladesmithing have a lot of eager students now. But, I think anyone who sign
    3 points
  5. a little more done today on this one but had to adjust this old bar cramp my gradfather made for my father in 1949 so it was usable for clamping blades with long guards. Cut a couple of pieces off the end annd with one slotted they were welded to the original cramping blocks and a wider foot welded to the base. With a soft faced clamp on the blade of the knife and the clamp up against the slotted cramping block it allows for the handle to be held securely for the glue up. Not at that stage yet as still playing with the handle shaping but nearly there. Once the handle is all but done and the S
    2 points
  6. 2 points
  7. The Lady Wife and I have been building a deck. The deck is nearly as big as the square footage of the house. It's been mostly weekends but she does have vacation time she needs to burn, so we took this last week to work on it. It's been in the 80's and 90's but the smoke haze dropped the temps into the 60's, good construction weather, if you don't need to breath. OBLIGATORY KNIFE RELATED CONTENT As I was cutting deck boards I found one with a ton of staples in it. I pulled my EDC to pry them out. I then thought about what most people would think about using this blade as a pr
    2 points
  8. Had to change the motor on the power hammer today. Was more than a simple bolt inn as the hammer was really built round the 1 hp motor but it was a 5 amp draw and was trying to draw 5.5 amps so kept shutting down. The new motor is a 2 hp unit and was/is substantially larger so it was a bit of a shoehorn effort. Had to shift the hinges mounting plate back about 3 1/2 inches and that necessitated shifting the treddle as well which was all welded i place. The hinged mounting plate was held in with 1/4 in bolst so had to drilll and tap them and the stop plate in thier new positions. I did have to
    2 points
  9. The 37 mbar delivery pressure may well be sufficient on its own to explain the poor performance. Things could be looking up. There may be some deviation from normal Gas-Safe practice needed: I don't think LPG necessarily falls within the same regs as mains gas (for anyone reading this outside the UK, "Gas-Safe" is the registration body with which anyone working with mains gas in the UK must be registered). Naturally Aspirated burners use the momentum of gas emerging from a jet to entrain air and mix it with the gas. This means we need a high speed through the gas jet. T
    2 points
  10. I'm not sure I would be in a hurry to make the coating thicker. I got a little carried away with the castable on my last forge project, and the thing takes forever to heat up now. 1/4" would probably serve you well.
    2 points
  11. That and when you go to fire it. Every step do as slowly as possible. A few days air dry. Then light a lazy flame in the forge for a few seconds. An hour later do it again. Then the next day do a couple more lazy flame burns. Then the next day do a lazy flame so the inside gets up to a few hundred degrees. Then the next day do a few seconds of high fire burn to get the inside up to a few hundred degrees. Then get the inside up to just glowing. Then you should be good. Of course, there is a good chance you can do things quite a bit quicker than all that. You just increas
    2 points
  12. After getting some handle on few blades for shaping tomorrow morning, I made a start on the knife this thread is about. First step was to cut the blade out of the bar A little bit of surgery was needed on the tang with a short extension welded on and a 5/32 hole drilled and countersunk for a copper rivet later that will be where the 1/8 handle pin goes through I ground the bronze spacer to .155 but have an idea they might be a bit thick for the subtle shine I want them to give. The ebony spacer is about right and the handle blockwas cut with a 6.5 degree an
    2 points
  13. All that is wrong with modern bladesmithing.
    2 points
  14. Thanks for posting the pic of the bar clamp. I've been using something similar, but never thought to cut a slot in the jaw for the blade. I've been using a block of wood with a slot cut in it, this will be a lot easier. Again, thanks.
    1 point
  15. Nice setup, Garry. And good job on bending the guard. It's tough to get that right without any flat spots or sudden kinks.
    1 point
  16. Well, that's not something I'd immediately consider in the design process while choosing a lining material but now I think about it, surviving sausage grease seems essential
    1 point
  17. Generally speaking, this forum is limited to knives you made yourself. Sometimes we'll allow people to sell knives by others, if the "other" is a well known custom bladesmith. You're kind of on the edge with the two knives you've listed. Tell you what: as long as you don't bump the threads, they can stay. Bump them without either new information OR a price change, and they're out of here.
    1 point
  18. USN Aircraft Carrier Arresting cable...Has anyone forged a knife using a piece of aircraft arresting cable? It is a mix of differing dia. strands, had a fibrous rope core (now removed). Been degreased. I am unsure if it is galvanized. I assume it is X(XX) grade plow steel. Just wondering if anyone has tried this cable, and would appreciate any suggestions pertinent to this particular cable. It is section of the "pendant" that trapped the first F-35 carrier arrested jet during sea trials aboard USS Nimitz. I would like to give the Test Pilot a nice memento.
    1 point
  19. All, thanks so much for the advice, especially Alan for doing the deep dive for specs. You've made this new guy feel very welcome. Full disclosure here, I am JUST starting into bladesmithing after thinking about it for ever, and don't want to mess up this pretty unique blade steel. So the finished knife could be quite a ways off yet. Fortunately, there is a very accomplished bladesmith gracious enough to take a group of us Vets under his guidance. I will take pics/video thru out and post those as it progresses. Any help/critique/advice humbly welcomed. I am recently r
    1 point
  20. I prefer slightly damp. The real leather folks call the condition "in case," which is just damp to the core, not wet enough to drip when squeezed. The guy who showed me would cut out the sheath blank, run it under the tap for a second or two, then put it in a plastic bag for a couple of hours prior to working on it.
    1 point
  21. Have a couple of other projects under cntroll so was able to get back to this today. grind is done and first bronze plate fitted. Next is getting the underside of the ricasso done and then on to the S guard so doing a bit of checking on others guards to find the right combination of curves, length and end treatment to hopefully complement the picture I have in my head.
    1 point
  22. We were behind on security patches and I had some time this afternoon to watch an upgrade. It seems that the upgrade, yet again, changed the visual look of the site. One of our trusty admins may find the time to tune it but what is more likely is that we will need to get used to the new look. Happy Hammering, Niels.
    1 point
  23. I really like the height. That should make it easier to stand up to batonning through tough wood.
    1 point
  24. It would take a bit of maths (and I’ve only had one cup of coffee) but you could potentially cast a shell out of aluminium or bronze and then cast lead into a central cavity to get up to weight?
    1 point
  25. I really like it, practical simple design that will perform and looks great. Nice work. Clint
    1 point
  26. Here is the metal dust collector painted in a high performance two tone color scheme.
    1 point
  27. 425 plus shipping sheath made by Roy carter
    1 point
  28. Not a company I've heard of, but looking at their other products it appears they just make objects shaped like other known objects regardless of actual functionality. Their forges and burners look like well-polished crap, in other words. For the price they want for that 1x30, you can save up twice that and get a decent 2x72 unless you insist on variable speed. Speaking of which, the VFDs they show are not sealed, and as such will stop working if exposed to fine metal dust. While I am impressed with the idea of a 1hp 1x30, the rate at which you'd go through those little belts w
    1 point
  29. First time ever casting anything. Ruined 2 crucibles and It all looks like crap but it was a lot of fun.
    1 point
  30. Ran out of things to do as excuses not to begin on this For the next time I'll remember to buy a lot more gluing clamps
    1 point
  31. I'll wish both of you an easy path, then.
    1 point
  32. I'm finding out what this "core" thing is that so many people talk about, currently it's AKA the middle part that hurts. Surprising development, told my Dad I'd quit (again) and offered to pay for his treatment, and he told me today he wants to give it a try......
    1 point
  33. Those look good!
    1 point
  34. Yes,Rob,i like that a lot. For skinning these fat-bellied kind of blades are sweet(actually looks very much like a butcher knife i use,only shorter,which will be easier on one's wrist). Most "hunting" knives are narrower,and also commonly have the section close to that of a crowbar or a cold-chisel. It puzzled me for ages,till i finally figured out it must come from the time when people had actually took their game apart at the joints(vs molesting it into shreds and chips with saws and god knows what all). It does help to be narrower and thick-ish to get in between t
    1 point
  35. Good luck, brother. I feel your pain.
    1 point
  36. Good luck my friend. That is one evil I have never had to fight, but only because so many people I know were fighting it that I learned to stay away.
    1 point
  37. I like the no-frills skinner look there, Rob. Nice one.
    1 point
  38. Not to disparage anyone's concerns, but the risk of fire in a clean, well organized shop is pretty negligible. Build the shop to match your desires and if sparks are a concern, a piece of sheet steel between the grinder and the wall will provide all the protection needed. One of my gas forges gets put in the doorway and I use it's base to prop open the door. The backside of the forge is less then six inches from the door and in 15 years has never even scorched the paint.
    1 point
  39. The slanted chisels make for a really nice look when you stitch with thread. You also do not have to go all the way through both pieces of leather. You can go through the top layer and simply mark the back side of the lower piece, then chisel the lower piece separately. It's a little risky, but t works. For a sheath, you would be punching through the top layr into the welt, then through the welt into the lower layer, and finish up the lower layer. A lot more work, yes, but the results can be pretty dramtic. This guy is really good.
    1 point
  40. So. I have a bag of xanthan gum powder left over from a failed experiment. I mixed a 1/4 teaspoon into a tablespoon of water until it mostly dissolved. I then applied it to the edges and flesh side of a sheath I was working on. I do like the result. Very smooth surface. The edges burnished well.
    1 point
  41. Hey, Chris I just replied to your other thread. A #3 beveler will be ok for 6oz. A #2 would probably look good also. You’ll end up buying every size beveler. I did anyway. On the nine prong punch, that will be a bear to pull back out of two pieces of 6oz leather. I think those 9 prongs are more for wallet and bag makers. A 4 prong is mighty tough to pull back out sometimes. I’ve even broken the glue bond pulling one back out. When I hand sew now, I use just a 2 prong on most projects. I’m fairly new to leather work myself. But I am enjoying it. Trial and error with me. Hope this i
    1 point
  42. I do not do kitchen knives but if I had to say I might have to do a wooden sheath! Having said that, "every knife deserves a sheath"! I mean hell what do you do with a knife without protection for the blade. A folder is safe inside of it's handle. A hunting knife or any carry style knife is worthless without a sheath to protect the knife and its owner! I figure its a necessary evil when it comes to sheath making!! There is a good DVD by Chuck Burrows about sheath making and has a lot real good tips on how to get the professional look! https://www.amazon.com/Custom-Knife-Sheaths-
    1 point
  43. If I need a shiny burnished edge, I use the tragacanth. It looks much nicer than dry burnishing. It can be messy if you get it on the hair side, though, only use it on the flesh side and cut edges. And don't let it freeze. When it thaws you have a bottle of gummy bear guts. With a polished bone or antler slicker, especially with a notch filed to fit the thickness of your edge, it produces really nice results. It's how they get the edges of leather belts to look so smooth and shiny. It's more of a pro leatherworker thing, though, and I am about as far from a pro leatherworker as I
    1 point
  44. As the title suggests, this represents a lot of new things for me... first time casting fittings, first time carving wood, first hollow grind, first double edged blade, first time setting gems, and many more. This is a gift for my mother and was originally conceived because I am obsessed with Jake Powning's work and I desperately want one of his blades, but simply lacked the funds... so in true blacksmith fashion, if you can't afford it, make it yourself. It is of course no where close to the quality of his work, but I am fairly happy with what I ended up with. Made from... 8 rubies 6 sa
    1 point
  45. i haven't tried it but pulling vacuum might get the bubbles out of the resin and minimize the sinking
    1 point
  46. Oh I would love to get some real blacksmithing projects like gates but there doesn't seem to be a huge market around here for fancy stuff Put a handle on this one and I like the overall look of it. Never tried a rough brute de forge look before. Buuuut the last picture shows that it might really be a good idea to complete a design before beginning and adhering to it The angle of the handle flows with the spine but ends up being too low and close to the table. Should have left the heel 3-4mm higher or shaped the spine and tang to angle more away from the edge. Oh well,
    1 point
  47. Looking great. Can't wait to see it finished.
    1 point
  48. hey, Pair of spurs made for a reconstructor (not to be used for horses). Made of mild steel. First attempt to make... Thanks Jacek
    1 point
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