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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/26/2021 in Posts

  1. Hi All Finally something worth showing here. I really enjoyed making this Bowie. Pattern welded blade, 1095, 1075 and 15N20 Deer antler handle, oxidized Sterling Silver fittings Guard Iron/Nickel deeply etched. Total length 43 cm, Blade 28.5 cm
    10 points
  2. Yesterday finished up this forged wrought iron letter opener with a Mesquite handle. It's a Christmas gift for a family member. I gave it a slight antique finish.
    8 points
  3. There's a makers challenge on the book of faces that got me out of my messer dominated dreamland Started by going to the ever growing pile of half hammered things I forget about and found a suitably sizes piece drew out a tang and shape a bit and then ground bevels. I usually like fully sanded surfaces but wanted to see how an as forged finish would look I've never really bothered with getting perfectly square shoulders as I find it a lot less frustrating to file the bolster to shape Walnut grip drilled and then
    6 points
  4. This is the video of welding of rather hefty initial packet. The sword will be for my friend Erik, who is helping on the press. And the welding of the tip. The tip cut.
    6 points
  5. I have tried to weld and draw another billet, this is is all O1, edges and all "dark" steel, the white is soft "iron". I think the weld of the tip came out nicely, this time pretty symetrical on both sides.
    5 points
  6. Finally finished the cu Mai knife this was my first try at it and I was very happy with the results. The blade is A203,copper,15N20,copper and a 26C3 core. The handle is African blackwood with a peened copper pin and an A203/copper bolster. My photography is still lacking ,but I'm working at it. Wow I just figured out drag and drop.
    5 points
  7. I've made my own heat-treating kiln. Had to adjust a few things, but today I was able to do my normalizations, heat for quench, and temper on 2 different batches of blades. I'm thrilled!
    5 points
  8. Just put this one together - another facebook makers challenge that got out of hand: clay hardened 1095 blade - I haven't measured it but it's about 8", and thin, not much over 1/8th", with a false edge on one side. Wrought iron bolster and mild steel guard, with mild steel and nickel silver spacers. the steel has been oil-blued, and the ns is sculpted and polished. Oil-blued steel pommel plate with carved mammoth ivory panels. Macassar ebony handle carved with high relief knotwork, with steel pins. Scabbard is laminated millboard covered in lambskin, wi
    4 points
  9. Hi guys, I was talking to a client on the phone a couple of weeks ago regarding a project I am working on for him, when I mentioned that I was going to make some jewelry for my wife for Christmas... Well, not five seconds passed before he asked if I could make something for his woman while I was at it. Well, I agreed to make his woman a little "something" - and I just now finished the photographs. Thought it might be of interest to you guys as well knowing we all like shiny things.. Unfortunately though, this one isn't much for cutting...
    4 points
  10. That was a cross-guard. Also, it was only a flesh wound!
    4 points
  11. It's alive, IT'S ALIVE! MWAHAHAHAHA!!!! I had an old face mount pump motor sitting on the shelf. Turns out that one was reversible. The temporary mounting system is somewhat, "custom". But now that I know it works I can fab up a new mounting plate for it.
    4 points
  12. I came home from 4 days in the NM woodland and found this had arrived. One of my winter projects is a step closer to reality. Actually, several projects got a step closer.......
    3 points
  13. Hello all. It's been a good week. Had decent weather for a few days, so took advantage and remembered to take pics of what was done yesterday. These (along with 3 others from yesterday) are now soaking in vinegar, and 6 others from the other days are now in their 1st tempering cycle after quenching...
    3 points
  14. Not entirely knife related, and it was last night, but I thought I'd share the hobby that helps pay for the hobby of knife making A Few small Beads and other trinkets I dremel out of brass and other various materials. I know my soldering is atrocious, but after patina-ing it turns out kind of neat.
    2 points
  15. 1080/15N20 twisted crushed W's ,stainless dovetailed bolster.
    2 points
  16. Managed to get the wiring temporarily installed today, enough to turn it on and see what happens. Between the VFD and a neat old mechanical forward/reverse switch, there were a lot of places to get the polarity of the 3 phase wrong, but it's officially running! I only brought it up to about half speed because the motor and reduction gear plate is not mounted to anything and I was afraid the chain would jump off if moving too quickly. But it works! Now I need to hunt down a longer bit of 10/3 cordage and some strain relief connectors for the VFD box, then figure out the motor placement.
    2 points
  17. The mill has finally come in, early last week and I've only had a cursory look around the beast. It's a very handsome machine all said, I'm very excited to get to use it. The reduction gear is only part of the drive train, it seems. I discovered a handful of other reducing gears underneath and in the back end where the two shafts couple with the power. Spinning the motor by hand is very easy and has me feeling good about the torque output. There's a mystery shaft directly under the rollers on the underside of the table but I can't figure out what it's for. There is a mitered gear with teeth on
    2 points
  18. Tore out all the firebrick in my forge today, it was definitely time. When I first started forging I was so efficient that I could forge and work on bevels with my file jig in between heats. Or at least I thought I could, untill the forge got up to heat and I melted a horseshoe rasp in half. Since then I have tried multiple times to melt steel together with copious amounts of flux to make damascus. However, I am older, wiser, and more educated now, so I am redoing my forge in preparation for my next damascus endeavors.
    2 points
  19. Made this out of O1 with walnut burl handle.
    2 points
  20. This one of my more interesting (at least to me) recent projects. It's a gift for someone who was born and raised on a farm in (then) Czechoslovakia in the first half of the 20th century which got me into learning about some of the knife styles from the area throughout history. I settled on the Pastiersky Nož (shepherd's knife), which in silhouette looks pretty standard but is adorned with ornate tin alloy decorations. I had previously seen these on knives from Siberia and Finland but didn't quite get how they were made. Luckily, I personally know a number of native Slovak (an by extension mor
    2 points
  21. Good morning, all. For some reason, I seem to be in a picture taking mood, and here's the blades after heat treating. 2 of them had slight warps out of the quench, and this time I only needed the normal 2 tempering sessions to get them straight. I need to remember to do my asymmetrical grinds after heat treating.... PS- The funky shaped tang on the bottom one is where I had a coupon that I broke off to check the grain. This one is my first completely powder blade and I wanted to check my grain.
    2 points
  22. Handsanding on the 7 1/2 (rimu) and 5 1/2 inch chef's (dyed lacewood) and a heavy hunter I want to try on the hill next hunt with the orange liners and spacer.
    2 points
  23. Hello All! Trying to remember to actually post and not just ogle your amazing work all the time, lol Here is a Kitchen Knife (my 2nd ever in fact *EDITED TO ADD: Second Kitchen Knife ever. My 2nd knife ever was barely a knife, lol!) that I just finished up for a good friend. I thought I'd Share the making of also, it'll kinda help explain myself and some the oddness of the blade. I hope its not too many pictures... The request was for a Bunka Type Kitchen knife ( you be the judge if we made it there), and the spin on it is San-mai using 15n20-Antique Steel-15n20. The thought
    2 points
  24. You're getting there, but I think you still have some issues with the haunches and pommel. the haunches should be rounder, and curve in towards the blade, and the transition from shaft to pommel flare should be more defined, and the pommel should have a bit more depth. here's a quick sketch of what i'm talking about: and a dirk i made in this style a few years back:
    2 points
  25. This. My experience has been that the energy stored in a heavier flywheel is lost fairly quickly when you overload the system, but then takes an annoying long time to come backup to speed. I'd go with aluminum. I've never had a disk grinder, so YMMV, but I've experienced this with a number of under-powered rotating machines over the years.
    1 point
  26. That study you're thinking about was from 2004, prepared by R.K. Nichols, AKA Quenchcrack, another metallurgist, at the request of Don Fogg here on this forum. I'll see if I can find the original post later, but here's the report. The Nichols report.pdf Edit: here's the original post:
    1 point
  27. Phenomenal workmanship! I love bowies, and this one is an awesome example. Especially like the inlay where the brow tine was cut, looks much nicer than leaving it as cut. Clint
    1 point
  28. Indeed! I love the details.
    1 point
  29. Core filed and smoothed down and got the outer leather sewn on. Added a riser at the mouth of it for the locket to sit against
    1 point
  30. These three are ready now with the 71/2 in (with Rimu) and 5 1/2 in (Lacewood) chef's both on 3/32 NitroV SS away to new homes and the Heavy Hunter with OD canvas micarta over 1/8 orange G10 on the 3/16 NitroV SS blade "maybe" staying with me to trial as a hunter for the smaller animals where it was designed for the larger game. Always good to know if it will be nimble enough for all game so for the one knife hunter it will be an all purpose knife.
    1 point
  31. I have scrapped 2 and kept the flywheels ….two others are now in use as belt grinders/sanders. One of the wheels saved is 36 “ in diameter With a 2 3/4” bore….I have the shaft and bearings but have not set it up yet. I love those flat true wheels under the belt.
    1 point
  32. 1 point
  33. I think nail polish will do it, just be careful removing it. Acetone can dissolve the epoxy, if they used any. And use purple glitter polish, that way you'll be sure you didn't miss a spot! If you do get the FeCl on bone or ivory, it will turn orange. I don't know if it is fixable.
    1 point
  34. If you were really careful and used a muffle pipe in the forge I would think you could make a serviceable blade. Watching for the phase change (decalescence and recalescence) is not going to be enough for peak performance, as you have carbides you need to worry about. But let's say you forget about the optimization of the carbides; what's the worst that is going to happen? You will have larger carbides rather than the finer dispersion of carbides. And unfortunately that is going to lead to you surrounding matrix having a non-ideal composition, as the carbide chemistry affects the surroundi
    1 point
  35. That's the beauty of English, the same word can mean many things!
    1 point
  36. Thanks! Learned something new there. "Bail" ... sounds like something you either pay to get a friend out of the slammer, OR an activity you do to keep a boat from sinking...
    1 point
  37. but note that the line of the haunches forms a smooth curve from blade to shaft. if you pay attention to the negative space in that image, the relationships might become clearer...
    1 point
  38. Is it really "stabilized". or is it more like embalmed?
    1 point
  39. Nice job Alex, I hear those are great to use, I'm sure your friend's wife will love it!
    1 point
  40. The more I (over)think of it, it seems like it's just a function of length versus width/knuckle clearance.
    1 point
  41. If you are working with high speed disc sanders you may also want to wear an apron as it will leave bees wax on your cloths. It washes out but for the rest of the day you have a bees wax streak on them. Bees wax is also great for cutting large holes with a hole saw in steel, or aluminum.
    1 point
  42. RPM is good it might be a little short on HP @1/3 ,however I have seen disk grinders guys have made from old furnace motors that are 1/4 HP. Mine are 1200 RPM and 1/2 HP.
    1 point
  43. I like the whole package. That was quite ambitious for a second knife . If I was to give your some critics, I'd say you're spine line is a bit weird and could have been easily fixed with a file or on the grinder. That's about it. Well done
    1 point
  44. Japanese Chef Knife has a ton you can look at. The traditional wa handles all seem to be straight, and the majority of the Western style handles also seem to be straight too, but some of the fancier knives have different angles.
    1 point
  45. Finally got my forging area laid out a bit better. Also finished roughing out my first real foray into forged kitchen knives. 213 layers of 1084 and 15n20, with a 15n20 edge bar welded on. My little bottle jack press made a huge difference in getting this thing done. I'd probably still be hammering on the second stack without it. We'll see how well this ends up coming out.
    1 point
  46. I got a chance to get out to the shop after a few weeks away. I managed to get a spiralized handle mostly done on a sword, and got started on the pommel.
    1 point
  47. Thanks! I might try this on my next "art" knife. I already did . According to him, he'll be back this fall. You can't back up now @Zeb Camper
    1 point
  48. I made this about 8 years ago, inspired by the Coleridge poem, but never got it finished 'til now, after someone wanted to buy it. let me know what you think...
    1 point
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