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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/02/2021 in all areas

  1. Hey everyone! I taught a class at the New England School of Metalwork over the last week and thought I would share some images here! I took a ton of photos over the class, but will kind of pair it down to the images of the demo spear I made, and a few shots of all of the spears together. We studied and made three pattern welded billets based on historical patterns seen on various originals. We also drew out a bunch of wrought iron sheet from round stock for the sockets. We also made some really nice edge steel, 480 layers of
    18 points
  2. Just put this one together - another facebook makers challenge that got out of hand: clay hardened 1095 blade - I haven't measured it but it's about 8", and thin, not much over 1/8th", with a false edge on one side. Wrought iron bolster and mild steel guard, with mild steel and nickel silver spacers. the steel has been oil-blued, and the ns is sculpted and polished. Oil-blued steel pommel plate with carved mammoth ivory panels. Macassar ebony handle carved with high relief knotwork, with steel pins. Scabbard is laminated millboard covered in lambskin, wi
    17 points
  3. I got the photo proof back yesterday from Whetstone studio of my full set. Some of these you have likely seen already. These are the five that were in the judging room
    17 points
  4. A few weeks ago a kid (I say kid, college senior doing an honors thesis, probably 21 or so ) came to my local guild meeting to ask if anyone could help him with a sword. His honors thesis involves hand-making everything that appears in a portrait of a Scots nobleman of the mid-18th century. He's already made the shoes and belts, woven the fabric for the hose and jacket, made the hat, and all sorts of other things. Since he also makes flintlock rifles by hand, and as such proved he's no idiot, I agreed to see what he could do with the equipment I have that he needed to help with the sword bla
    16 points
  5. Hello, i finished my friction folder with wolf´s tooth pattern edge. The blade is made of wrought and K720. I used bronze disc for a "stopping" part of the blade which is decorated with silver inlay. The handle is made of antler. The knife is great companion for light travelers for preparing their snacks and their battle against hunger. Probably it is some gift from rohirrim for their hobbit friends I hope you like it
    15 points
  6. This is the other knife I got out of the damascus San Mai billet. My forging was considerably better on this one, but the bevel grinding less so. It's got a 4" blade and a 4 1/2" handle. The handle is brass, desert ironwood, and deer antler. It has the one and only gut hook I hope to ever make, and it is functional only thanks to the gentleman on this forum. This is one of those projects that I am happy to see done. However, critiques are still more than welcomed.
    15 points
  7. I made this about 8 years ago, inspired by the Coleridge poem, but never got it finished 'til now, after someone wanted to buy it. let me know what you think...
    15 points
  8. Hi everyone, I just finished a tanto I had been working on for the last 3 weeks . The blade is W2, uchi-sori with a 7 1/2" nagasa, and the fittings are copper with shibuichi inlays. Here are the photos of the build: Profiling: Hardening: Polished: Now for the part that's really time consuming, the fittings: For this blade, I decided on a ginkgo leaf theme, a symbol of pe
    15 points
  9. Hi All Finally something worth showing here. I really enjoyed making this Bowie. Pattern welded blade, 1095, 1075 and 15N20 Deer antler handle, oxidized Sterling Silver fittings Guard Iron/Nickel deeply etched. Total length 43 cm, Blade 28.5 cm
    14 points
  10. This one of my more interesting (at least to me) recent projects. It's a gift for someone who was born and raised on a farm in (then) Czechoslovakia in the first half of the 20th century which got me into learning about some of the knife styles from the area throughout history. I settled on the Pastiersky Nož (shepherd's knife), which in silhouette looks pretty standard but is adorned with ornate tin alloy decorations. I had previously seen these on knives from Siberia and Finland but didn't quite get how they were made. Luckily, I personally know a number of native Slovak (an by extension mor
    14 points
  11. And here is the result. I'm pretty happy with it, taking into account that this is a learning piece. I've learned a lot, both about the original seax and the techniques learned to make the reproduction. Things I would change for the next one: correct the section profile, and change the cross hatched engravings near the hilt on the left side of the blade. That looks out of place. I'd als skive the edges of the leather even thinner. It was now about 0.2mm. And maybe try dyeing the leather with a natural dye. I'd also use a sandwich construction next time, with shear steel edge between
    13 points
  12. Finally got it done. It's been quite the challenge to dry fit each part independently, especially since the bolster tapers in thickness too, but it kept me busy during quarantine too
    13 points
  13. 1080/15N20 forged by maker, eyed crushed W's with stainless fittings and a Walrus handle.
    13 points
  14. It's been what, 3.5 years since I first posted here, working with a file jig? And now I'm being published in Blade. This is crazy... And mostly because of this forum. The knife pictured was supposed to be in the KITH and I couldn't finish it in time. Thanks to everyone here who took the time to answer my questions with patience and respect.
    13 points
  15. finished riveting up basket hilt attempt number three. Finally got one I'm pretty happy with. my original plan was to braze it after riveting, but honestly the risk/reward doesn't seem worth it...
    12 points
  16. Hello, I would like to introduce myself and especially my work here. My name is Jiri and I come from Czech Republic and I am interested in forging and other related crafts for a long time (maybe since i was 12 years old…now i am 25 :D). My work became presentable (I hope) since covid times, when i had plenty of time to practice. I enjoy making knives/ other things inspired by history and fantasy stories (mostly Lord of the rings). First thing i want to introduce, is my Rohirrim set which consists of small utility knife and bigger broken-back seax. The small one is the first knife where i
    12 points
  17. And a Gralloching Dirk. 1075 blade with filework and shallow scraped fullers. Hand carved bog oak handle. Copper ferrule. hand tooled and stitched leather scabbard. let me know what you think...
    12 points
  18. Hello, i would like to show you my last work. Blade is made from wrought iron, mild steel and my favourite K720 and the handle materials are bronze and subfosil oak. Ihope you like it and i will post its "brother" very soon .
    12 points
  19. Hello all, Long time lurker, first time posting! I wanted to share with you the first blade that I forged from some crucible steel. I first found wootz about 8 months ago and instantly fell in love with the watered pattern, I had to make a knife. I watched tons of youtube videos, read research articles until my brain went numb and got lost on sketchy Russian/Ukrainian websites searching for bulat with google translate. In the end I followed pretty closely to what is outlined in the Verhoeven and Pendray research articles about wootz. However, I pulled significant amounts of inform
    12 points
  20. This is not what I was hoping to post but that will come soon. Just finished this little Hunter, 476 layer 1084 & 15N20, Brass, Bog Rata. Total length 22.5 cm, Blade 11 cm.
    12 points
  21. Yesterday was long but rewarding Finished filing the ball of the chape Then a few hours of final sanding and sharpening the blade. It was getting late but realized just how little there was left so decided to keep going and peened the guard onto the blade I have never liked the idea of using the compression from the grip and pommel to hold everything tight as wood is natural and soft. Oh and my vise in a vise setup to hold the blade Peening Then low
    12 points
  22. My humble beginnings began when I was just a kid. Always fascinated by fantasy, I made some wooden Legolas swords from the Lord of the Rings, and Aragorn's elvish dagger out of metal. Unfortunately this was before I had a camera, much less a camera phone (they didn't exist) so I don't have a photo of those. Moving on to 2014, halfway through college, the knife making bug bit me when I made the knife in the first photo. Un-hardened stainless steel from some scrap with plenty of scratch marks and mistakes.... but it looked cool I guess! Started a low output business, ran it successfully for a fe
    12 points
  23. My mother commissioned me to make this one as a gift for her grandson (my nephew). He likes to fish and hunt, and my sister actually picked out a pattern from one I'd made years ago. It has contemporary elements like the ricasso and and etched logo, but I had to incorporate the seven pin bird-head handle to keep a little 18th century vibe going. I forged the blade from 1084. The handles are, as Dr. Jim would say, bovine ivory (cow bone). The pins are 6p finish nails. Leather sheath dyed with iron acetate and hardened with heat and bee's wax. 4.25" blade, 8" overall.
    12 points
  24. Just finished putting this one together. 1095 blade with hamon, fullers and filework. Carved yew handle. Fileworked copper fittings with bog oak throat insert and hand cut Skye Marble pommel setting. Brazed copper scabbard lined with felt and covered in lambskin. Storage box with copper accents, lined with leather and felt, with bog oak inserts. Let me know what you think...
    12 points
  25. Just finished this small narrow sax. Wrought iron and silver steel for the blade, box wood bolster and bog oak handle, carved with a bind rune for the recipient and a geometric border. Riveted copper draw ring with bronze bail. Tooled leather sheath with copper and bronze fittings. let me know what you think.
    12 points
  26. It’s been a long time since I posted anything this is the latest off my bench FullSizeRender.mov
    12 points
  27. Just got these finished up. Clay hardened 1095 with filework and mustard etch, and a baked oil finish. Carved bog oak handles, with antler bolsters and pommels. Bog oak sheaths with leather throats, and copper clips for antler handled ferro rod fire steels. Commercial boxes with fitted foam lining. Went a little more rustic than usual, but I think I like them... Let me know what you think...
    12 points
  28. Hi guys, I recently posted a preview of a blade I have been working on, and I have now finally been able to finish the complete knife - sheath not included... thought I'd give a bit of a new preview of the whole thing. All inlay in both handle, bolster and blade are 24 karat gold wire, 0,7mm in thickness. Bolster is in meteorite iron - which is nerve wrecking to work with when doing inlay. Some areas are more fragile than others, and if you look closely at the "R" - you'll see the outline of a
    12 points
  29. Taking a pause on the Norwich saber to get the carving form ready for this piece. It will be a falcata with a tiger theme… so we’ll see where that ends up. Forged this blade almost 20 years ago!
    11 points
  30. Dubbed "The Fang of Caerbannog" for the rabbit tooling. This is what I would call a Type XVa/XVIIIc (open to feedback if you think it's mis-classed). It has a wide diamond blade with reasonably generous profile and distal taper. The tooling is a combination of vegetable vine and marginalia murder rabbit. The 6.5" grip is of poplar with a thread underwrap, and cord embossed leather overwrap. Hexagonal guard with tapered, upturned quillons. Tapered Type J with a slightly domed p
    11 points
  31. Hello there, I finally finished the oyster knoife. It was fun and I tried and learned some new stuff on the way. The blade is 80CrV2 tempered as soft as I could without TME. It's got flat grinds and convex "edges". The "tentacle" guard is cold blued mild steel with copper sucker inserts. The spacer is acid aged copper and handle is myrtle.
    11 points
  32. And here is the finished sword. I can't quite stress enough how the pictures do not do it justice because the hilt is very light and the blade is very dark so no matter what I did, the contrast always looks off. I'm tempted to get it professionally photographed, but for now this is the best I can capture it. Here are the overall stats for the finished sword: - Overall Length: 51.875" (131.8cm) - Blade Length: 40.0" (101.6cm)
    11 points
  33. Alright, finally managed to get the handle together and finalized the damn thing with a pommel nut today. My 2nd pommel nut ever, and first in pattern welded steel w. gold inlay. So, the handle wood is stabilized maple, with 925 silver and vulcanized fiber spacers. The bolster, pommel and mid-section are forged from railroad steel, engraved in a deep relief with 24k. gold inlay and set with two 0.03ct diamonds, four rubies and four sapphires. The runes of bolster and pommel reads: Hrothlitnir synir Sons of the Famous Wolf Skol ok Hati Skol a
    11 points
  34. Hi, i finally finished another long time project. Rohirrim spear. It is made of k720 steel and wrought iron. Horse heads are bronze, silver inlayed and they are brazed to the socket. I hope you will like it!
    11 points
  35. I'm working on these two machines at the moment! they are just so pretty I thought they should get their own thread! The 2 cwt is my personal hammer, now rebuilt after the fire. The 1 cwt is off to a customer. In the UK both of these machines are regarded as 'Rolls Royce' Not often you see them side by side in nice condition They are both ready for testing next week. Busy busy!
    11 points
  36. Forging a copper rose pommel for a misericorde I'm working on. Also going to try and make a couple of tiny ones for the ends of the quillions...
    11 points
  37. This took quite a while, the blades on these are relatively simple but oh the ridiculous amount of small individually shaped pieces in the hilt add up in all there are 49 individually shaped and finished pieces in the sword Some time in the far far future I might hope to be able to do something even half as inticrate and detailed as the originals. They are just utterly mind boggling once you take a good hard look at them and how they are made
    10 points
  38. Hello, i recently got that knife into my hands. Probably it is a knife from Dale, the city which was destroyed by dragon Smaug and after his death it was rebuilt. The knife comes from times after the city was restored. My opinion about its origin is based on two main things. First is obvious, it is a dragon head which is on top of the "locking mechanism". Second one is the style of decoration which we can see on the knife. Acording those sharp edges of the inlayed parts and a little carving in scales, i assume that it is influenced by the art of dwarfs who have their kingdom under the Mountain
    10 points
  39. Early style knife forged from 5160, walnut scales and pewter bolsters
    10 points
  40. It's been a loooong time since I have posted anything and frankly a long time since I have made anything interesting, so I thought I would share this as a WIP. I am getting remarried this fall and wanted to make something special for the occasion. I decided to go with a cake server. I was having trouble finding inspiration from existing cake servers so I instead took inspiration from stilettos. At this point the blade is solid sterling silver, a "neck" of bronze, and the handle will be faux ivory g10. Some of these design elements will change over the course of the process as frankly I'm bein
    10 points
  41. another couple I'm finishing up after starting them years ago. 1095 sycamore and copper: let me know what you think...
    10 points
  42. This was my first attempt at a split & drifted axe. I uses a chisel I had and forged the eye drift out of a piece of 1" round stock. My grandson had a birthday coming up and his father had given me a big piece of dump truck leaf spring, so I thought I would give it a try. I didn't have a suitable hold-down, so I tacked a piece of 1" angle to the back of it so I could keep it in my hardee hole white I split it. (I also drilled a couple cheater holes to keep things straight). This is what I wound up with:
    10 points
  43. Hi everyone! Hope you've all survived the Holiday feasting without too much abdominal pain! (and yet we have New-Year eve right around the corner! ) Anyhow, I've been working on this Seax inspired blade... It is not exactly historically correct - but I weighed my need for self expression higher than historically accuracy in this project. Below is a preview of the blade itself. Currently I am working on the handle - more specifically the rear bolster. Engraving is a time consuming process I'm afraid... The blade length from where the tang meets t
    10 points
  44. I was recently contacted by someone through my FB page asking about a dagger I made several years ago (2016?). He wanted to know if I could make another one and how much it would cost. Now you know why I use templates! I have the blade, guard, and handle templates from this dagger and can reproduce a fairly accurate copy. This is a 9-bar blade, and it's accordion cut, so I need a big hunk of steel. Here is the starting billet. 3.25" x 1.5" x 5.5"
    10 points
  45. Hi, I based on the archaeological find from Gniezo (Poland). It is dated to early-medieval. Blade length is 20 cm. Wolf's teeth have been made "unplugged", I used only basic and historical tools. I used several kind of the materials, mostly scrap.
    10 points
  46. 1080/15N20 twisted crushed W's ,stainless dovetailed bolster.
    10 points
  47. Just got this one finished. Antler, bog oak, copper and 1095: let me know what you think...
    10 points
  48. Blade forged from 1080 / 15N20 ,crushed W's pattern, then stretched. Masur Birch handle with stainless fittings.
    10 points
  49. This title may surprise some of you, coming from me as it is with my constant emphasis on learning to grind freehand. And I still think freehand is the best way to do large blades, and the only way to do certain complex historical grinds. Folders, however, are another story. They have to be precise, and it's darned near impossible to grind folder blades while holding them in hand, since they have extremely short tangs and get too hot to hold very fast. I was bumbling along with a make-do extended handle thing (basically clamping the little blades to a chunk of 1x3/8 flat bar),
    10 points
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