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Dan

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  • Location
    Mass.
  • Interests
    TSKSR, (classical Japanese military art; kenjutsu, staff  Naginata, yari, jujutsu)<br>Koryu and modern Jujutsu<br>Swords, knives, khukris
  1. So How do I get me some of that? Dan
  2. Dan

    Bush nectar

    Now Tai Jut think of how much prettier that would look with a Hamon...... Runnin and a duckin Dan
  3. Dan

    Cutting test

    Hi Jimmy I know and converse with Tony and am quite familiar with Howards blades, those in the polishing biz and many in Japanese Budo. You should know I am in Budo as well (in a very well respected one at that, in fact the oldest extant Japanese school) thus I am extremely familiar with the whole test cutting thang and have been doing so for almost 25 years. My post was only for a discussion of uniformity of testing materials so there are measurable and thus compatible results..... thats all. If you read between the lines, I am fan of our efforts over the Japanese efforts and can and do show our efforts will out cut theirs. I have spent tens of thousands of dollars buying, testing and destroying Japanese blades to prove it. Anyway, for me the irony of your reply is that I have been saying the .....exact....... same thing as you for years in Budo circles-that their cutting material is unimpressive and have been getting slammed for saying it. Further, (and you can read my replies on E-buo and sword forum thus there are witnesses to this), I have openly made fun of my own buddies and told them their grass cutting efforts can be done with a $15.00 re-ground lawnmower blade. That a $3,000-$6,000 katana was not needed. I have kidded that I will show up with a lawn mower blade in full katana mounts (with the arbor whole remaining) I will name my blade "The Grass cutter" and do just as much cutting as they do! Overall, I believe you will find me as irreverent of all the hoopla and as practical as a smith can get. For me it is budo with a hands-on-hammer approach to blade ware. Sometimes not so popular with the skirt wearing crowd but I can back up what I say on any given day.....with steel in hand, like only a blacksmith can. Cute story I proved a point for a couple of Japanophile students of mine who thought the Japanese sword was the be-all and end-all for bladeware. They spent the day using my Katana and naginata blades to test cut trees. After they were feeling good about themselves I said "Ok fellas, there you see what you can do with two hands and a thirty inch blade. Watch this" I then proceeded to pull out a 16 Kukri, and matched their cuts with a single hand swing with a blade half the size. It was a lesson learned for them to NOT be snobby and dismissive of other cultures efforts in steel. As or the video of the large mat test cuts..I believe that was watson's angle fire stuff. Most of it was western style swords-but they were morphed blades (not period correct) with longer handles made for test cutting. I tend to look at tests as "artificial things" these days. Most competant smiths can manipulate a profile to make the test blade cut the material better. I am far more interested in what would have been a field blade ready to use for a particular eras battlefield and then see what "it" can do. as an example: there are well established blade profiles for japanese swords in eras of their maunfacture. They are defined for use those eras. Make a blade for that era and see what it can do. Today they are morphed (as our imagination may lead) for certain things and even then we manipulate the profile for "single test" materials. In other words 1. narrow and flat cuts grass better but it is a week battle blade 2. thicker with an appleseed grind from the shinogi on down (Japanese call it niku- meat) makes for great soft and hard cutting-thus it is an overall superior blade. So whats the down side? The superior, battle grade, overall superior weapon, does not cut grass as well. It would on the other hand last on a field of battle and behave...well... sort of like a real weapon should behave. The grass cutter would not. Thus the average uninformed martial artists or suburban white boy observer, can make a serious error in judgment of weaponry based on perceptions that are false. I cut trees as it is far more demanding, I have also cut livestock and lamb and beef and pig for test cutting. I also stab and cut cloth wrapped beef and pig to test knives. In short, I am a little........wierd. I do it to test what I make and to test...well....me. Not that most people or smiths even care about all this hoo ha..... It is like a discussion of handle wrappings and furniture types for a sword handle. Most would die laughing at how persnickity we get. But tens of thousands of cuts later you can bet that my contemporaries and I are very concerned about the fit and furniture remaining tight. We even may get all snobby and picky about the styles and match ups far past the correct and traditional wraps. Maybe we're just foo-foo boys after all. If any of this is confusing it is entirely my fault. I am a terrible writer. Cheers Dan
  4. Ray I love the composition of both...nice job. Its been a while since I considered the turned hilt ( up and down) Dan
  5. Dan

    Design Work

    So this is what we decided on for the big and little brother set. The big one is ten inces with a stag and Leather grip. At the end of the day it isn't a Scagel, but one of my own he liked. i will be forging this weekend with my son I bought a digital camera and will track the progress just for fun. If I can figre out how to use the damn thing! Dan
  6. Dan

    Cutting test

    Hey........I have 9 acres. I cut trees! But if you're gonna cut tatami and bamboo, why not be consistent with what it is for-test cutting simulations. That way you can compare to a constant (or a control) instead of just going around whacking at stuff. Same reason we cut rope...to compare to what we or others did before. Otherwise our bladesmith test would be...this knife cut 200 times in rope as compared to this one that cut 17 times through a car door that compares to this one that cut 16 times through a truck door that compares to this one that broke on a pipe compared to this one that cut a 2x4 as compared to this one that cut 4 trees as compared to.............you get the picture. Its relatively meaningless. Unless you have multiple, comparative, single experiences, yourself with similar styles of blades the whole group goes out the window. If we keep inventing new mediums with no control group-it can all get fairly meaningless for statistical/comparative purposes. All that said...uhh...I still cut trees simply because it's fun Dan
  7. Dan

    Cutting test

    Hey Jimmy.......yer supposed to use greeeeeen bamboo ya silly. Dried bamboo is not the "tradtional" target material. It is too stiff for the sword. Thus it doesn't simulate any body contact-which is the whole idea with bamboo and or tatami omote. When you do get the tatami make sure to soak it in water for about 6-8 hours and then take it out and let it dry for an hour before you cut it. Too dry and it its a bugger to cut through-if you can at all. To wet and it will just sag. And try to get Tatami omote that are new. Some of the used ones have dirt, gravel, sand, old condoms, and you might even get an old ladies broken heel tip she wasn't supposed to wearing; all ground into the fibers, making a hellashis mess on the surface of your blade. Ok, I exagerrated... about the sand.......but you get the gist! What a bunch of crazy old men............... Wish I was there cheers Dan
  8. Dan

    Design Work

    It also helps with section profiles.I did cutting tests with various shapes with some friends. I am deep into the Japanese arts-they are into euro stuff Dan
  9. Dan

    Design Work

    Yeah I know..... for years I just "smithed" out of my head. It was creative -yes. But I found the more I played by drawing and then smithing the more creative I got. But hey...thats just me I can make a blade "profile" then play with a grind Top is a recurve bowie then a flat grind then a chisel grind Dan
  10. Dan

    Design Work

    This is corel designer 12 Its great as it has all then symbal libraries you need fro engineering and architectural but then you have the advantage of all the fill effects. Corel draw will work too Dan
  11. Dan

    Design Work

    Tribute to friend and teacher Hugh Bartrug Uloo Skinner Dan
  12. Dan

    Design Work

    Kukris These are from an early 1800's design a friend brought back from Nepal. the rest is all mine. its very serpentine. I am not a profesional graphic designer nor do I pretend to be. It is what I hope to be an aid in my process. ..... Cheers Dan
  13. Dan

    Design Work

    I have a client who would like a matching set of Scagel type knives-camp knife and hunter. I have recently begun using the cadd software I use at work to start desgining knives now that I am back to forging. I used to hand draw then transfer to a shim stock cut-out that I could layover without it burning up What do you fellows use to desgin with? P.S I am copying anothers well established design ideas And.....there will be Hamon on it. That should please Tai. Dan
  14. I just wanted to say thank you very much. He contacted me and has what I can use. I'll let you know how it turns out. Thanks Dan
  15. Yes But it is not common, and when I have seen it (just twice) -it was in lower carbon steels; say 1050 more so than in the higher ones. But that may be... just me. It happened where ashi are. It is always been my guess that what I saw was a contraction area of pearlite frozen in the ashi within the area under expansion in the yakiba. It was only a very thin skin/surface problem. It may be long while before you see it again. It has been that way for me. Just now I edited...... I remember "thinking" I saw it again once when it was a wheel/belt score from my poor grinding technique.....doofus. cheers Dan
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