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Dan

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Everything posted by Dan

  1. So How do I get me some of that? Dan
  2. Dan

    Bush nectar

    Now Tai Jut think of how much prettier that would look with a Hamon...... Runnin and a duckin Dan
  3. Dan

    Cutting test

    Hi Jimmy I know and converse with Tony and am quite familiar with Howards blades, those in the polishing biz and many in Japanese Budo. You should know I am in Budo as well (in a very well respected one at that, in fact the oldest extant Japanese school) thus I am extremely familiar with the whole test cutting thang and have been doing so for almost 25 years. My post was only for a discussion of uniformity of testing materials so there are measurable and thus compatible results..... thats all. If you read between the lines, I am fan of our efforts over the Japanese efforts and can and do show our efforts will out cut theirs. I have spent tens of thousands of dollars buying, testing and destroying Japanese blades to prove it. Anyway, for me the irony of your reply is that I have been saying the .....exact....... same thing as you for years in Budo circles-that their cutting material is unimpressive and have been getting slammed for saying it. Further, (and you can read my replies on E-buo and sword forum thus there are witnesses to this), I have openly made fun of my own buddies and told them their grass cutting efforts can be done with a $15.00 re-ground lawnmower blade. That a $3,000-$6,000 katana was not needed. I have kidded that I will show up with a lawn mower blade in full katana mounts (with the arbor whole remaining) I will name my blade "The Grass cutter" and do just as much cutting as they do! Overall, I believe you will find me as irreverent of all the hoopla and as practical as a smith can get. For me it is budo with a hands-on-hammer approach to blade ware. Sometimes not so popular with the skirt wearing crowd but I can back up what I say on any given day.....with steel in hand, like only a blacksmith can. Cute story I proved a point for a couple of Japanophile students of mine who thought the Japanese sword was the be-all and end-all for bladeware. They spent the day using my Katana and naginata blades to test cut trees. After they were feeling good about themselves I said "Ok fellas, there you see what you can do with two hands and a thirty inch blade. Watch this" I then proceeded to pull out a 16 Kukri, and matched their cuts with a single hand swing with a blade half the size. It was a lesson learned for them to NOT be snobby and dismissive of other cultures efforts in steel. As or the video of the large mat test cuts..I believe that was watson's angle fire stuff. Most of it was western style swords-but they were morphed blades (not period correct) with longer handles made for test cutting. I tend to look at tests as "artificial things" these days. Most competant smiths can manipulate a profile to make the test blade cut the material better. I am far more interested in what would have been a field blade ready to use for a particular eras battlefield and then see what "it" can do. as an example: there are well established blade profiles for japanese swords in eras of their maunfacture. They are defined for use those eras. Make a blade for that era and see what it can do. Today they are morphed (as our imagination may lead) for certain things and even then we manipulate the profile for "single test" materials. In other words 1. narrow and flat cuts grass better but it is a week battle blade 2. thicker with an appleseed grind from the shinogi on down (Japanese call it niku- meat) makes for great soft and hard cutting-thus it is an overall superior blade. So whats the down side? The superior, battle grade, overall superior weapon, does not cut grass as well. It would on the other hand last on a field of battle and behave...well... sort of like a real weapon should behave. The grass cutter would not. Thus the average uninformed martial artists or suburban white boy observer, can make a serious error in judgment of weaponry based on perceptions that are false. I cut trees as it is far more demanding, I have also cut livestock and lamb and beef and pig for test cutting. I also stab and cut cloth wrapped beef and pig to test knives. In short, I am a little........wierd. I do it to test what I make and to test...well....me. Not that most people or smiths even care about all this hoo ha..... It is like a discussion of handle wrappings and furniture types for a sword handle. Most would die laughing at how persnickity we get. But tens of thousands of cuts later you can bet that my contemporaries and I are very concerned about the fit and furniture remaining tight. We even may get all snobby and picky about the styles and match ups far past the correct and traditional wraps. Maybe we're just foo-foo boys after all. If any of this is confusing it is entirely my fault. I am a terrible writer. Cheers Dan
  4. Ray I love the composition of both...nice job. Its been a while since I considered the turned hilt ( up and down) Dan
  5. Dan

    Design Work

    So this is what we decided on for the big and little brother set. The big one is ten inces with a stag and Leather grip. At the end of the day it isn't a Scagel, but one of my own he liked. i will be forging this weekend with my son I bought a digital camera and will track the progress just for fun. If I can figre out how to use the damn thing! Dan
  6. Dan

    Cutting test

    Hey........I have 9 acres. I cut trees! But if you're gonna cut tatami and bamboo, why not be consistent with what it is for-test cutting simulations. That way you can compare to a constant (or a control) instead of just going around whacking at stuff. Same reason we cut rope...to compare to what we or others did before. Otherwise our bladesmith test would be...this knife cut 200 times in rope as compared to this one that cut 17 times through a car door that compares to this one that cut 16 times through a truck door that compares to this one that broke on a pipe compared to this one that cut a 2x4 as compared to this one that cut 4 trees as compared to.............you get the picture. Its relatively meaningless. Unless you have multiple, comparative, single experiences, yourself with similar styles of blades the whole group goes out the window. If we keep inventing new mediums with no control group-it can all get fairly meaningless for statistical/comparative purposes. All that said...uhh...I still cut trees simply because it's fun Dan
  7. Dan

    Cutting test

    Hey Jimmy.......yer supposed to use greeeeeen bamboo ya silly. Dried bamboo is not the "tradtional" target material. It is too stiff for the sword. Thus it doesn't simulate any body contact-which is the whole idea with bamboo and or tatami omote. When you do get the tatami make sure to soak it in water for about 6-8 hours and then take it out and let it dry for an hour before you cut it. Too dry and it its a bugger to cut through-if you can at all. To wet and it will just sag. And try to get Tatami omote that are new. Some of the used ones have dirt, gravel, sand, old condoms, and you might even get an old ladies broken heel tip she wasn't supposed to wearing; all ground into the fibers, making a hellashis mess on the surface of your blade. Ok, I exagerrated... about the sand.......but you get the gist! What a bunch of crazy old men............... Wish I was there cheers Dan
  8. Dan

    Design Work

    It also helps with section profiles.I did cutting tests with various shapes with some friends. I am deep into the Japanese arts-they are into euro stuff Dan
  9. Dan

    Design Work

    Yeah I know..... for years I just "smithed" out of my head. It was creative -yes. But I found the more I played by drawing and then smithing the more creative I got. But hey...thats just me I can make a blade "profile" then play with a grind Top is a recurve bowie then a flat grind then a chisel grind Dan
  10. Dan

    Design Work

    This is corel designer 12 Its great as it has all then symbal libraries you need fro engineering and architectural but then you have the advantage of all the fill effects. Corel draw will work too Dan
  11. Dan

    Design Work

    Tribute to friend and teacher Hugh Bartrug Uloo Skinner Dan
  12. Dan

    Design Work

    Kukris These are from an early 1800's design a friend brought back from Nepal. the rest is all mine. its very serpentine. I am not a profesional graphic designer nor do I pretend to be. It is what I hope to be an aid in my process. ..... Cheers Dan
  13. Dan

    Design Work

    I have a client who would like a matching set of Scagel type knives-camp knife and hunter. I have recently begun using the cadd software I use at work to start desgining knives now that I am back to forging. I used to hand draw then transfer to a shim stock cut-out that I could layover without it burning up What do you fellows use to desgin with? P.S I am copying anothers well established design ideas And.....there will be Hamon on it. That should please Tai. Dan
  14. I just wanted to say thank you very much. He contacted me and has what I can use. I'll let you know how it turns out. Thanks Dan
  15. Yes But it is not common, and when I have seen it (just twice) -it was in lower carbon steels; say 1050 more so than in the higher ones. But that may be... just me. It happened where ashi are. It is always been my guess that what I saw was a contraction area of pearlite frozen in the ashi within the area under expansion in the yakiba. It was only a very thin skin/surface problem. It may be long while before you see it again. It has been that way for me. Just now I edited...... I remember "thinking" I saw it again once when it was a wheel/belt score from my poor grinding technique.....doofus. cheers Dan
  16. Hey............. I stuck up for ya on that thread! I don't mind the opinion. I trust ya don't mind mine. cheers Dan
  17. This is a spin off of The Kukri thread where Tais laments us using hamon on western things and tells Don.............well, just go read it. This is my reply Personally, I enjoyed going to Tai's site and seeing that introductory picture on the front page. And what is that Dan? Why it is a picture of Westernized bowie type knife with..a hamon on on it. But that cannot be Daniel, Tai does not approve of a hamon on something not Eastern. Why he is even sick of Hamon on things that should be hamon'ed. "It is positively Gauche, uncouth!" he says. In the strangest of aruments he alludes that the Japanese did it best in the old days and nothing we have done is better so we should leave the style alone. This is odd since he himself is doing the "old" tribal thing and re-doing it modern. Which is similar to what we're doing with hamon on western knives! Are you saying he is a heathen as well Dan? But....But... sputtering as I speak... There it is for all to see- says I to me. How can this be? said me-to-me After all his ranting to thee and me His own "bland" hamon on blade steel we see Crafted by him for all to see Is the "Cliche" rant he cried to thee Because he cannot do it ? Said I to me Or is it the cry of the artist-at-heart To "seek new visions" from our "ways" we must part YES! "Cliche' !" cries Tai. This is not the way "Be original! Unique..." its sure to pay Make up new styles- it's the only way Like in architecture; arches, columns, and porches and such Are an eyesore, over-done, cliche.. simply much too much we need new visions, not just tried and true Only new designs of glass, and steel will do And the people? They cried "Woo hoo! Woo hoo!" But Wait! Tai? He looked back....at tribes and new stuff Combined them to make "new shit- look old" I cried in a huff Or like space ships had landed on earth in a puff to warp tribe peoples minds round knives with a twist Of modern materials lashed falsely- round styles that don't fit I'm just confused "Neo-tribal?.... I don't get the jist of making other smiths feel badly and even some pissed When he does the same thing explained here now you see Why he's just like us A Cliche' soon to be I think I'll stick with what works best for me My very own vision of what my steel wants to be My time is best spent when I work true to me Tai be damned! Why? He is.... not me He's not even him!! He works just like you and me Making shit up .....even when done to a T So his "new" stuff has been done before Just like architecture- We love old.... we love new! And the people? They still cry "Whoo hoo.... whoo hoo!" So it all works out well... in the end, so you see For the clients still purchase "the visions" of you all and me. Me:P
  18. deleted -see knew thread titled... Tai's lament Dan
  19. I posted this in a different area-perhaps wrong area. So....does anyone know if it is still available? Thank ye kindly gents Dan
  20. Hi Guys Anyone know where it can be found-either in old stock for sale or is anyone still making it? Thanks Dan
  21. Man I suck. I still cannot figure out how to take a picture and send it. What a moron. Dan
  22. Oh Heck This really boils down to Tai thinking one genre has been done to death and is cliche. I don't see any trouble with that. One mans trash being anothers treasure. I, on the other hand, see primitive knives as an exuse for not being willing or able to do high level work.........running and duckin Seriously though whats the trouble with Tai's view? While I absoloutly dissagree with it-I see no trouble with him stating it. Don, I don't know if you just said it wrong...sorry, but I thought I would correct it for the guys reading. Utsuri is not the dark area-it is the white area behind-or above that -dark area-that presents a shadow or reflection to the hamon. It is separated from the Transitonal zone by a layer of established pearlite-thus the darkness there and the darkness toward the shinogi which is separated by the white utsuri which looks like a reflection -white -to-white. Hence, no darkness between the hamon and the utsuri and no darkness between the utsuri and the shinogi? Ya see no reflection or difference of any kind! And that means no utsuri to discuss For those who may not know, Utsuri is best seen when freshly acid-etched or in high polish. Utsuri, as Don Stated is an area of unresolved pearlite-to-martensite that is stronger than pearlite-thus contributed to latterall strength. It is most commonly formed by a thinning out of the layer of clay there-and/or by various heating methods. And thats all I'm gonna say. Dan "Who still puts hamon on everything cause Tai's an idiot and we know better." Have you seen the way he dresses? sword2_001.bmp
  23. Don The hamon is great and I wish more Americans would pay attention to it. IF they knew what Ashi are -they sure as heck don't show it in their work. And Saka Choji? With an American smith? Forget it. Great Job Dan P.S. don't listen to Tai
  24. Really,... first it was modern damascus, Jimmy was it's mother,...then it was hamons on everything, Don started that one,.... then it was Neo-Tribal, I was the father,... then it turned Neo Devo and split into Hillbilly Baroque, Harley's babies,... ... that makes Harley the new Bill Moran! Tai ********************* Hey I'll give ya that. But then there may be lots of fathers who gave birth to the same idea. That also makes Cleston Sinyard the father of stainless damascus and using various steel and iron powders and Hubbard (from conn. I forgot his first name) the father of sheet (shimstock) damascus. And Jimmy Shmidts the father of file work and goblin folders I met them and saw the product before the Moran kissers awarded the credit to someone else. Do I get to be the father of carborized meteorite? Since it was stolen from me while I was coaching a guy through the process for an article that never saw the mention of my name? or maybe the correct formula for hamon clay that aint clay? I aint NEVER seen that anywhere. Not in Japanese or in English? But wait! I can't be the daddy- the Japanese were. Maybe I was just the doctor who discovered the correct DNA of the daddy.....I'm confused Father of one 16 year old.........of that I am sure! cheers Dan
  25. I couldn't tell ya who has been placing hamon on "other " blades for how long. I started doing it in the mid to late-eighties. I kept trying to buy damascus from different makers (no power hammer till later) and none of theirs would produce a hamon till Jimmy Shmidts told me what I was doing wrong (wrong steels-low count). Then I was off on my own with my own mixtures and finally......Hamon. Then was the agony of studying how to do them right. First on Japanese swords and then on little arrow heads for fun and then on other things like American shaped knives and axes, I thought it was my own idea-Hah!! BUT!!!! I sure as shootin never talked with Don or Rob Hudson about it and viola!!! there they were in the magazines doing it too. Before me? I don't know or care Since they're older n'dirt it probably was... I think the idea was (or is still) that we who do this dang stuff just loved the look of Hamon and each said "Hey!! What if I do it on a bowie or a straight sword. I did quite few on these Uloo skinners that Hugh Bartrug got my hooked on for a while. They were like little jewels to me. His were brilliant though. Great blueing technique with nickel twists for contrast. When and where others started fandanglin with hamon on other shapes Ya got me. Was Don first? Could have been. I still remember seeing that double edge sword of his somewhere with a hamon. That was a beauty! Anyway If we all or -most of us- jumped on it by following, or through independant research; it still is up to the individual to express himself in a composition. I think it is fair to say Don may be leading the pack. Heck. I still remember the BIIIG deal in blade magazine about the first guy welding stainless steel damascus. I laughed my ass off. I remember Cleston Sinyard showing his bowies and skinning knives to me ten years earlier at the blade show- there they all were on the table for all to see. Made out of??? Stainless damascus. His steel? From car parts in the junk yard. I guess it can be like academia in who gets published first. Cheers Dan
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