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will52100

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Everything posted by will52100

  1. I'll second or third the use of old files and W1. Haven't made any in a while, work getting in the way of having fun. Anyway, I have done a couple of larger "household" strikers out of 1018 with a 1084 striking surface forge welded on just for fun and they worked well. Just normalize and water quench just the striking surface, maybe about an 1/8" or so deep. I do the draw back with a map gas torch, the tail or whatever you want to call it gets blue and the hard edge barely enough to sizzle water, then coat with bee's wax. And of course test strike before boxing. Before and aft
  2. I did one years ago and it seemed to add a little spring to the hits and maybe was slightly more forgiving on my hand and arm. But when the handle finally broke I never bother to do another so if there was any advantage it was so slight as to not make it worthwhile to me. Also, kinda gets in the way of choking up on the handle for detail work.
  3. Good to know. Since I'm making a couple of struck tools with wood handles, would H13 be good for that, or would S7 be better? I'm leaning towards H13 due to simplicity of heat treat. At least once it cools down some, I nearly melted at the forge last night.
  4. Got a couple of hammer eye punches I need to make and was considering Atlantic 33. I have made a lot of tooling from sucker rod, 4140, 5160, even some 52100, and was thinking of ordering some H13 until I ran across a video of Brent Bailey talking about it. This will be for a Brian Brazil style handled eye punch if that helps. Anyone with experience with Atlantic 33? Thanks
  5. I get some time this weekend I may try something like that. Got a free sample of 1085 from Pop's supply at a recent hammer in. It's about 2"x3/4" or 2"x5/8" round if I remember rite. I know it's not quite in the 1" criteria, but it should be interesting since I normally work a lot larger stock. My experience with 52100 is to thermal cycle it before, durning, and after forging. Knock on wood, I've only had a couple to develop cracks over the years even with lower temp forging cycles. It really responds well to multiple normalizing cycles.
  6. Forged 52100 hunter, bronze guard, stabilized Hawaiian Mango spacer, stabilized curly Maple handle, waxed leather pouch sheath. Blade has 4 3/4" cutting edge, 9 3/4" overall length. Price includes storage pouch and shipping in CONUS. 200$ I take check, money order, or PayPal. If paying by check or money order I will ship once the check clears the bank. If using PayPal I will ship next business day, or same day if post office is still open. I ship priority mail and include tracking number. Please email for more pictures or questions. William Courtney
  7. 3 1/2" blade forged from 5160, etched satin finish with hammer marks left on flats. 8 3/4" overall length. Epoxy impregnated 550 paracord wrap, kydex sheath with leather belt loop. Price includes zippered pouch and shipping in CONUS. I can supply a teclock if desired. SOLD I take check, money order, or PayPal. If paying by check or money order I will ship once the check clears the bank. If using PayPal I will ship next business day, or same day if post office is still open. I ship priority mail and include tracking number. Please email for more pictures or questions. Wil
  8. Forged 5160 blade, 4 3/8" cutting edge, 9 3/4" overall. Etched satin finish, forge marks on ricasso. Handle is epoxy impregnated paracord and leather. Leather spacer for the base to give a thicker side profile, orange paracord underlayment, black overwrap and Turk's head guard. Epoxy is soaked in at each stage of the handle's construction. Heavy leather vinagroon dyed sheath. Includes zippered pouch. 125$ shipped in continental US. I take check, money order, or PayPal. If paying by check or money order I will ship once the check clears the bank. If using PayPal I will ship ne
  9. 400 layers of 1084 and 15&20, 1/4 hollow ground, 3" cutting edge, 10" overall open, 6 5/8" closed length. Handle scales and wedge are maroon linen mycarta, brass pins and washers. Includes zippered pouch. 125$ shipped in continental US. I take check, money order, or PayPal. If paying by check or money order I will ship once the check clears the bank. If using PayPal I will ship next business day, or same day if post office is still open. I ship priority mail and include tracking number. Please email for more pictures or questions. William Courtney
  10. Forged from 52100, 5 1/8" blade with 3/4" smooth ricasso, sheep horn spacers and buffalo horn handle, bronze guard. 9 7/8" overall length. Heavy leather pouch sheath, etched blade finish. I take check, money order, or PayPal. If paying by check or money order I will ship once the check clears the bank. If using PayPal I will ship next business day, or same day if post office is still open. I ship priority mail and include tracking number. Please email for more pictures or questions. William Courtney SOLD
  11. Very cool looking bowie, love the shape and pattern.
  12. Amazing work, enjoyed following it's progress.
  13. Good looking knife. Only design element I don't care for is the notch at the ricasso, they have a habit of hanging up and catching instead of sliding into the cutting edge. But that's my personal preference, not everybody agrees. Other than that, I love the simple, clean lines.
  14. Both are forged from 5160, leather underlayment and acraglass epoxy impregnated. All black one has a 3 1/2" cutting edge and kydex sheath with leather drop loop, orange and black has a 4 1/4" cutting edge and heavy vinagroon dyed leather sheath. Black one has an acid etched satin finish, the orange one has a buffed satin finish. Email for more pics or info. 175$ each, shipping and zippered pouch included in the continental US.
  15. They are overpriced for what they are. If I could find or make good square cut threads for the screw and nut, I'd build a good one. When my old vise screw broke I looked at these and called and asked about them. I learned that they have have a few of them break the screws under heavy use, so I got some acme thread and nuts and fixed it. Not ideal, but it works OK. This is the only one I've found I'd be interested in, http://www.blacksmithsdepot.com/leg-vise-170.html but I can't find anybody that has one to give it a review and I'm too broke to blindly spend 800$ on something that may
  16. 38 long colt, it's a R&D conversion cylinder, Uberti 1851 navy.
  17. I have less inclusions using my press than I did doing it by hand. Might be cause my press is slower, not sure. I also think it's got something to do with diesel soak, I don't add a ton of flux when welding, I think maybe the diesel is acting as an oxygen barrier down inside the cable. I sometimes use diesel as a "flux" when doing normal pattern welding. I also have pretty much stopped using rusty, dirty cable. The other thing is 60% or better reduction has cut down on inclusions and flaws, along with forging close to shape at a welding heat. I've tried stacking a couple times, but I alw
  18. Forge vs cast, forged will be stronger, provided proper forging temps for the steel are used. Forging with a press or hand hammer or power hammer? Not so much, though there is a slight difference. The main difference between a press and a hammer, either power or hand, is that a press's dies stay in contact with the material for a lot longer and suck heat, causing a mini normalizing cycle for want of a better term. Does it make a functional difference? Not really. And depending on the steel type and what was done to it, the first thermal cycle does not always cancel out all previous treat
  19. I've done a couple from drill line wire rope. First thing to do is cut it in the chop saw and take it apart. The drill line I used had the entire center section coated with some sort of poly/plastic and I had to discard it, don't even think about trying to burn it out. I've had some wire rope I kept getting flaws in and when I took it apart I found a small plastic strip down the center with a number code on it, took it out and stopped getting flaws. Way I did it was to take the outer strands and soak in diesel fuel for a week or two and then stack them into a square, 3 strands wide and 3 s
  20. Your probably rite, but I wonder at butt welding the pipe on for a pivot. Butt welds are notorious for cracking under stress and it's a high carbon chrome steel that mild steel is welded to. I'm a welder and would still prefer to forge it around a mandrel. I haven't heard of any issues with the weld cracking there, but it's only a mater of time as it's a weak point. Of course I've no idea how much flex the piece takes, so it could be a very long time before it fails. I looked at that hammer a while back, but I've got a power hammer and hydraulic press. What I need is a striker. I do
  21. Thanks, wasn't planing on forge welding, just rolling the end around a mandrel and then after heat treat truing up with with a 1/2" drill bit. The reason I was thinking of heat treat is the 5160 I've got is in the annealed state. It would save some time and effort if I didn't have to quench and temper. Not hard mind you, just time consuming. One trick for forge welding 5160 or other high chrome steels is to put a thin slip of 1084 or 1095 between them when welding, though I've managed it without, just have to make sure everything is rite.
  22. Anybody built this hammer before? I've got the main construction done, hammer and anvil and guide is in place, most of the small linkage parts are done, just about ready to start on the flat spring and turnbuckle. I have a couple of questions, mainly the springs. The coil springs Clay list, the plans say "Bend spring into a "U" and heat a spot on the center coil with a torch until it separates. Bend out a 2 turn loop, cold on each end" Am I overthinking things, or just bend in a "U" and heat the middle and grab a couple loops with some pliers and pull them out? The other questi
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