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jake cleland

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Everything posted by jake cleland

  1. Still futzing with this one that I've been working on for the past few days as a distraction from the basket hilt that's breaking me (hopefully more on that front soon...). 1095 blade, hammered copper habaki, brass seppas, bog oak fuchi and kashira, stained and lacquered poplar burl tsuka, buffalo horn mekugi, stained elm saya sealed with shellac. Still got to play with the polish a bit and maybe make some menuki. And I still need to buy a new camera, but my car's in the shop, and it'll be another week before I find out how poor I am... let me know what yo
  2. I've been working on hamons for close to 20 years, and get the result I'm hoping for maybe 1 in 10. That looks perfectly fine to me - you're not going to get anything flashier with that steel. There looks to be plenty of activity that could be brought out, so you can use it for polishing an etching practice, but there's no mileage in going for a full art polish on a kitchen knife that's going to get used, in my opinion. If it were me, I'd give it a longish soak in ferric to get some contrast and just let the natural patina develop from there.
  3. That isn't going to be anywhere near as much of a problem on a kitchen knife cross section...
  4. It would be useful to see an unedited pic to see what you have, but there is nothing inherently wrong with this in a hamon - basically the part that doesn't darken wasn't brought up to critical (it is basically a form of utsuri), which shows good temp control. There maybe activities in the actual hamon which could be brought out, but this steel is finnicky and needs a lot of normalization to show much of anything... That said, you would probably have better luck with ferric or even nitol...
  5. 1/4" is pretty standard starting stock thickness for a traditional habaki...
  6. Just finishing these up for a customer. Big one has a 12" blade in 1095 with bog oak and boxwood. Wee one is about 4". Now I need to get back to figuring out the basket hilt. Anyway, let me know what you think...
  7. So I'm finally going to get around to building a sword heat treating forge, and I'd like to be able to get an accurate read on the temperature. I have 2x 12" K-type probes and a digital thermometer/display unit that I bought years ago. My question is how to mount them? Do I need to stick some stainless tube into the forge to shield them, or can I just drill a hole in the shell and poke them through the wool? Do I need to do anything to protect the plastic connectors at the ends of the probes? Ideally I'd like to be able to take measurements at either end of the forge and one in the centre - ca
  8. Today I sharpened the blade and added a copper suspension ring and belt loop to the sheath. The Spanish notch is just a decorative design element. The filework also extends right round the tang, which is tapered in two planes.
  9. Just finishing this up for a friend who's a classical violin player. 1095, buffalo horn spacers attached with blind pins, bog oak and poplar burl: let me know what you think...
  10. Straighten in a vice at normalising heat, just above critical, and repeat until it stops twisting - heating to welding heat and hammering is just compounding the stresses that are causing this...
  11. No acetylene, sadly, but my dad has a good half inch propane torch which might put out enough heat for small joints. Figure I'll get the main joint's done first and see how that goes...
  12. I'll try and document as I go. May have a trial run at the basket next week. My forge doesn't get hot enough to weld mild to mild consistently, so my plan at the moment is to braze all the parts together. I figure I can dovetail all the main joints off the main guard and cold peen them tight, and wire up the butt joints at the top. If I get everything tight, hopefully when I come to braze on the saltires and other decoration the braze shouldn't want to run out of the other joints too much, and I figure I can flux everything and have some filler rod handy... It just seems too complicated to tr
  13. Made a card mockup for an uncoming commission...
  14. Nope, not like that. Think I've figured it out. 1/4" PCL to female 1/4" BSP from the compressor and 1/8th" hose tail to male 1/4" BSP from the hose. I'm sure there should be a way to do it with a single fitting... Lindsay palm control.
  15. A few years back I bought an airgraver with the insurance payout after a car crash, but shortly afterwards I moved house and didn't have a suitable place to set it up, so it sat in the box ever since. Long story short I'm now setting up a clean shop where I can use it, but I have no idea what kind of adaptor i need to attach it to a uk compressor. I know what I'm looking for - a 1/4" bsp nipple which fits the compressor, with either a 1/8th barb to fit directly into the hose, or a female connector that will fit the 1/8th nts male threaded part that is attached to the hose, but I have no idea w
  16. Working on a dirk scabbard. The main body is built up from 2mm mill board, with wet moulded leather sheaths glued to the front to take the by-knife and fork. Still a few bit's and pieces to do before it's ready for covering, but I like to get these sheaths done fairly early in the process and give the glue as much time as possible to cure while I finish the rest of the knife/knives...
  17. A few years ago Alan gave me a pipe hawk handle blank which I never got around to making a head for. It's my dad's birthday on Thursday and he smokes a pipe, and has a few pipe hawks he's made from hatchets,, so I decided to make a head to fit the handle and give them to him to finish up. I planned to make it from mild steel, but I couldn't find a suitable piece, so I used wrought. Had a bunch of problems because a.) I was running out of gas, b.) I don't have a drift, and c.) my forge doesn't really get hot enough to weld wrought to itself unless everything is tight and ground clean, which isn
  18. Just finished this. Forged 1095 with integral finger guard, antler scales with peened copper rivets. leather blade cover with riveted copper suspension ring, and antler toggle. excuse the picture quality and let me know what you think...
  19. Just finished these up. Clay hardened CS70 and bubinga, with foam lined storage boxes not much else to say about them. let me know what you think...
  20. I forge this style of dirk with a straight spine and a bit of belly to the edge. The belly straightens out in the quench, pulling the tip down to the centre line, and you can tidy up the profile without losing any length.
  21. or normalise thoroughly and do it cold, then normalise again.
  22. I've found a place that sells cable by the metre, fairly cheaply. It's clean - no grease or lubricant, no synthetic core - but galvanised. What's the best way to prep it for welding?
  23. Just finishing up these as a commission from a friend for her twin brothers. Blades are iron serpents in mild steel with silver steel edges, about 4" long. Handles are boxwood, carved with two bands of dirk knot linked by a ring knot down the spine. One side of each handle has a view of our local mountain range, and the other has a bind rune for each brother's name. The knives have buffalo horn bolsters and lanyard bales, with a square plaited draw pull representing climbing rope, and copper spacers and brass pins.
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